Overclock.net › Forums › Software, Programming and Coding › Operating Systems › Linux, Unix › FreeBSD Is No Longer Building GCC By Default
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

FreeBSD Is No Longer Building GCC By Default

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
As of last week, the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) is no longer being compiled by default as part of the FreeBSD base system.

Going back for many months we have known that FreeBSD developers (and BSD users in general) have been pushing for a LLVM/Clang world and to limit the usage of GCC. Clang has grown in functionality for being on-par with GCC as a C/C++ compiler and it's more liberally licensed than the GPLv3 GCC and the LLVM-based feature-set continues to expand like faster and lighter compilations. This has been part of the plan for FreeBSD 10.

source: http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=MTQ1ODc

Some benchmarks of GCC vs LLVM (as that was my main concern with this change): http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=llvm_clang33_3way&num=1
post #2 of 8
From looking through the benchmarks, the only real advantage that I see to using Clang is that it was faster for some of the timed tests. Two in particular being the Imagemagick and PHP tests, where Clang had a significant lead over GCC. Unless someone works with those primarily, I don't really see a point in using it over GCC, from a performance perspective. I guess their reasoning is the license. I don't know much about the differences between the licenses right now, I'll probably look into that after classes today. It does seem like they will at least leave you the option of using GCC over Clang, so it doesn't seem to be as big of a problem.
post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FateousMaximous View Post

From looking through the benchmarks, the only real advantage that I see to using Clang is that it was faster for some of the timed tests. Two in particular being the Imagemagick and PHP tests, where Clang had a significant lead over GCC. Unless someone works with those primarily, I don't really see a point in using it over GCC, from a performance perspective. I guess their reasoning is the license. I don't know much about the differences between the licenses right now, I'll probably look into that after classes today. It does seem like they will at least leave you the option of using GCC over Clang, so it doesn't seem to be as big of a problem.

I'm sure there'll be some projects that still require GCC (eg the source code has compiler specific directives) but with any luck they'll have GCC listed as one of their dependencies
post #4 of 8

you know you are anal retentive if gpl v3 isn't liberal enough for you...but it is nice to see a adequate alternative to GNU stuff.

Bazinga Punk
(12 items)
 
ooh shiny!
(6 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Xeon 3440 AsRock P55 extreme Evga 8800 GT 512 MB Gskill Ripjaws 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Western Digital Blue Antec Khuler 620 Ubuntu 11.10 Asus vw264H 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
GIGABYTE KM7600 CORSAIR TX 650 Cooler Master 590 GIGABYTE GM-M6800 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core I5 6500 Gigabyte z170xp-SLI Nvidia 970gtx Corsair 16gb ddr4 2666mhz  
Hard DriveOS
250gb Samsung Evo 850 Windows 10 & Ubuntu 15.10 
  hide details  
Reply
Bazinga Punk
(12 items)
 
ooh shiny!
(6 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Xeon 3440 AsRock P55 extreme Evga 8800 GT 512 MB Gskill Ripjaws 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Western Digital Blue Antec Khuler 620 Ubuntu 11.10 Asus vw264H 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
GIGABYTE KM7600 CORSAIR TX 650 Cooler Master 590 GIGABYTE GM-M6800 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core I5 6500 Gigabyte z170xp-SLI Nvidia 970gtx Corsair 16gb ddr4 2666mhz  
Hard DriveOS
250gb Samsung Evo 850 Windows 10 & Ubuntu 15.10 
  hide details  
Reply
post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Transhour View Post

you know you are anal retentive if gpl v3 isn't liberal enough for you...but it is nice to see a adequate alternative to GNU stuff.
erm, I think you've completely missed the point there. On all counts. It's about more than just licences and LLVM is more than just an "adequate alternative to GNU stuff". The point behind LLVM is to provide a multi-language solution; while GCC does support other programming languages, it's nowhere near as sophisticated as LLVM is.

But even if it was just about licences, I think it's more anally retentive to think that GPL should be the one licence to rule them all. In many regards, the GPL fanboys (and I'm genuinely not suggesting your one of them) are more anal than the (for example) BSD guys. There's a great deal of restrictions on GPL which doesn't exist with many other copyleft licences. So I love the fact that there is other licences out there. Variety and all that.

Anyhow, I've drifted off topic. Is anyone using Clang yet (CaptainBlame, I think I've read that you do)? I'm still just using GCC on FreeBSD and in no rush to make the switch. But it's great to see that Clang has finally reached maturity.
Edited by Plan9 - 9/12/13 at 4:42pm
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan9 View Post


erm, I think you've completely missed the point there. On all counts. It's about more than just licences and LLVM is more than just an "adequate alternative to GNU stuff". The point behind LLVM is to provide a multi-language solution; while GCC does support other programming languages, it's nowhere near as sophisticated as LLVM is.

But even if it was just about licences, I think it's more anally retentive to think that GPL should be the one licence to rule them all. In many regards, the GPL fanboys (and I'm genuinely not suggesting your one of them) are more anal than the (for example) BSD guys. There's a great deal of restrictions on GPL which doesn't exist with many other copyleft licences. So I love the fact that there is other licences out there. Variety and all that.

Anyhow, I've drifted off topic. Is anyone using Clang yet (CaptainBlame, I think I've read that you do)? I'm still just using GCC on FreeBSD and in no rush to make the switch. But it's great to see that Clang has finally reached maturity.

 

i don't think I missed the point since I was making a joke :). (the author of the article felt it was a important point to make). I'm actually against the GPL for the most part, I feel it takes too much rights away from the developer, and hands too much to the community for little in return imho. 

 

I built the latest development build of php in clang after reading the article, I'll stick with gcc for now.

Bazinga Punk
(12 items)
 
ooh shiny!
(6 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Xeon 3440 AsRock P55 extreme Evga 8800 GT 512 MB Gskill Ripjaws 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Western Digital Blue Antec Khuler 620 Ubuntu 11.10 Asus vw264H 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
GIGABYTE KM7600 CORSAIR TX 650 Cooler Master 590 GIGABYTE GM-M6800 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core I5 6500 Gigabyte z170xp-SLI Nvidia 970gtx Corsair 16gb ddr4 2666mhz  
Hard DriveOS
250gb Samsung Evo 850 Windows 10 & Ubuntu 15.10 
  hide details  
Reply
Bazinga Punk
(12 items)
 
ooh shiny!
(6 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Xeon 3440 AsRock P55 extreme Evga 8800 GT 512 MB Gskill Ripjaws 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Western Digital Blue Antec Khuler 620 Ubuntu 11.10 Asus vw264H 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
GIGABYTE KM7600 CORSAIR TX 650 Cooler Master 590 GIGABYTE GM-M6800 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core I5 6500 Gigabyte z170xp-SLI Nvidia 970gtx Corsair 16gb ddr4 2666mhz  
Hard DriveOS
250gb Samsung Evo 850 Windows 10 & Ubuntu 15.10 
  hide details  
Reply
post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Transhour View Post

i don't think I missed the point since I was making a joke smile.gif. (the author of the article felt it was a important point to make). I'm actually against the GPL for the most part, I feel it takes too much rights away from the developer, and hands too much to the community for little in return imho. 
Ahh sorry mate. I thought that was a weird comment from yourself, completely missing the fact it was a joke. *blush*
post #8 of 8
FreeBSD can use one compiler for the base and another for ports. Keep in mind that GCC in the base has to meet licensing requirements for integrating into commercial applications, as FreeBSD is the foundation of many closed source software. As a result FreeBSD actually uses GCC 4.21 (the last version with gpl2 license) in the base not 4.8, so it is logical that they move away from an outdated version of gcc.

You can still use a GPL3 licensed GCC for compiling ports, gcc in ports is currently version 4.6.3.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Linux, Unix
Overclock.net › Forums › Software, Programming and Coding › Operating Systems › Linux, Unix › FreeBSD Is No Longer Building GCC By Default