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Need help, first time overclocking

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
So I've decided to overclock my i7 3770k and I've got a few questions before I start ordering things I need.
My specs if needed:
i7 3770k Ivy Bridge
Kingston DDR3 16384MB (4 x 4096)
GTX 670
ASUS P8Z77-V
Corsair CX 600W PSU


I'm fairly new to this, and have read a few guides, but am a bit unsure on some things.
First of all, I need to know if I would need a better power supply.
Second, what CPU cooler should I get? At the moment I just have the stock one.

Help would be appreciated.

EDIT: Also, I'm new to this forum, so if I posted in the wrong subforum please tell me so.
post #2 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by dboylolz View Post

First of all, I need to know if I would need a better power supply.
Second, what CPU cooler should I get? At the moment I just have the stock one.

Slowdown there, big fella!

Before you start buying parts I'd play around a little with overclocking first. It will take you quite a few hours (weeks, months?) of trial and error before you have any idea of what you're doing.

Or you could just copy someone's settings. But then when an overclock fails or you screw up you computer you won't know how to fix the problem because you'll have no idea of what you actually did.

Backup everything first.
Read a lot
Change one thing at a time
Keep notes. Use a pencil and paper to write down what you did and the result.
See my sig!
Edited by billbartuska - 9/14/13 at 5:54am
My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
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My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
  hide details  
Reply
post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by billbartuska View Post

Slowdown there, big fella!

Before you start buying parts I'd play around a little with overclocking first. It will take you quite a few hours (weeks, months?) of trial and error before you have any idea of what you're doing.

Or you could just copy someone's settings. But then when an overclock fails or you screw up you computer you won't know how to fix the problem because you'll have no idea of what you actually did.

Backup everything first.
Read a lot
Change one thing at a time
Keep notes. Use a pencil and paper to write down what you did and the result.
See my sig!

I see, any tip on where to start?
post #4 of 8
Read, read, then read some more!
Update you BIOS and all drivers to the latest.

Learn how to do this:

Find out your max FSB
Slow down CPU
Slow down Memory
Then OC FSB to find max FSB.

Find out your max CPU speed
Slow down Memory
Then OC FSB/Multiplier to find max CPU speed

Find out your max Memory speed
Slow down CPU
Then OC FSB/Multiplier to find max Memory speed.

If you learn to OC this way, and go slowly (small changes!) and only change one setting at a time, then, when an OC fails, you'll know what to back off to get stable again. Keep notes with pencil and paper!

When you know all three, you can put together your best OC
.
None of this mentions voltages. So long as you stay away from changing voltages it's pretty much impossible to do any permanent damage.
Then there's memory timings and voltages. Watch out for OCing memory. This can destroy data (irrecoverably) as memory can start writing bad data to the HDD(s) and anything and everything can get corrupted.

When you're comfortable doing all the above you can go back and start playing around with volts and timings in each step to get even better OCs.

Get: CPU-Z, OCCT, Prime95, CoreTemp, SuperPi, and HWMonitor (No linkeys, to easy to find them all).

Go slow and get ready for a lot of BIOS resets!
My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
  hide details  
Reply
post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by billbartuska View Post

Read, read, then read some more!
Update you BIOS and all drivers to the latest.

Learn how to do this:

Find out your max FSB
Slow down CPU
Slow down Memory
Then OC FSB to find max FSB.

Find out your max CPU speed
Slow down Memory
Then OC FSB/Multiplier to find max CPU speed

Find out your max Memory speed
Slow down CPU
Then OC FSB/Multiplier to find max Memory speed.

If you learn to OC this way, and go slowly (small changes!) and only change one setting at a time, then, when an OC fails, you'll know what to back off to get stable again. Keep notes with pencil and paper!

When you know all three, you can put together your best OC
.
None of this mentions voltages. So long as you stay away from changing voltages it's pretty much impossible to do any permanent damage.
Then there's memory timings and voltages. Watch out for OCing memory. This can destroy data (irrecoverably) as memory can start writing bad data to the HDD(s) and anything and everything can get corrupted.

When you're comfortable doing all the above you can go back and start playing around with volts and timings in each step to get even better OCs.

Get: CPU-Z, OCCT, Prime95, CoreTemp, SuperPi, and HWMonitor (No linkeys, to easy to find them all).

Go slow and get ready for a lot of BIOS resets!

Thank you for your quick response. Will try to learn.
post #6 of 8
very great tips from bill, and since you are a beginner, always go with small increments.

When you start Overclocking what you want to do is have everything on default (voltages, timings etc) Than you test it.

From there you start moving only 1 variable at a time to make sure it is stable, if it isn't you fiddle around with the voltage. You will eventually get the hang of it, but bottom line be patient and you will get the results you want eventually.
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 4790K MAXIMUS VII GENE NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970 G. 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
G. WD Black Caviar 1.5 TB Samsung 840 Evo Samsung 840 Pro 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
EK PE 360mm EK PE 240mm EK 980 Plexi WB EK 140mm D5 Rad Top 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
MCP 655 D5 Windows 8.1 ACER XB270HU Corsair K70 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Enermax Maxrevo 1350W Caselabs S5 Corsair M65 Corsair K200 
Audio
Sennheiser PC 350 
  hide details  
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 4790K MAXIMUS VII GENE NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970 G. 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
G. WD Black Caviar 1.5 TB Samsung 840 Evo Samsung 840 Pro 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
EK PE 360mm EK PE 240mm EK 980 Plexi WB EK 140mm D5 Rad Top 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
MCP 655 D5 Windows 8.1 ACER XB270HU Corsair K70 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Enermax Maxrevo 1350W Caselabs S5 Corsair M65 Corsair K200 
Audio
Sennheiser PC 350 
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post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by soulwrath View Post

very great tips from bill, and since you are a beginner, always go with small increments.

When you start Overclocking what you want to do is have everything on default (voltages, timings etc) Than you test it.

From there you start moving only 1 variable at a time to make sure it is stable, if it isn't you fiddle around with the voltage. You will eventually get the hang of it, but bottom line be patient and you will get the results you want eventually.

One question though, if I want to eventually get somewhere near 4,2-4,5GHz will I need to buy a new CPU cooler while testing? Only running on stock atm, been thinking of buying the Noctua NH-D14.
post #8 of 8
well i think you can hit 4.5 with stock voltages so as long as your CASE has good cooling dont think you need a new heatsink til you up your voltages or change any other variables. And the Noctua NH-D14 is a great heatsink just swap out the fans for something with better Static pressure
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 4790K MAXIMUS VII GENE NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970 G. 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
G. WD Black Caviar 1.5 TB Samsung 840 Evo Samsung 840 Pro 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
EK PE 360mm EK PE 240mm EK 980 Plexi WB EK 140mm D5 Rad Top 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
MCP 655 D5 Windows 8.1 ACER XB270HU Corsair K70 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Enermax Maxrevo 1350W Caselabs S5 Corsair M65 Corsair K200 
Audio
Sennheiser PC 350 
  hide details  
Reply
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 4790K MAXIMUS VII GENE NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970 G. 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
G. WD Black Caviar 1.5 TB Samsung 840 Evo Samsung 840 Pro 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
EK PE 360mm EK PE 240mm EK 980 Plexi WB EK 140mm D5 Rad Top 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
MCP 655 D5 Windows 8.1 ACER XB270HU Corsair K70 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Enermax Maxrevo 1350W Caselabs S5 Corsair M65 Corsair K200 
Audio
Sennheiser PC 350 
  hide details  
Reply
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