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Help me build my first rig - Page 2

post #11 of 12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BiG StroOnZ View Post

I went with the TX3 over the 212 because it's on sale and you are going to achieve about the same clocks on either. Around 4.3-4.5GHz.

I went with the SanDisk SSD over the Samsung 840 EVO because it is as fast as the Samsung 840 Pro for a fraction of the price. The 120GB model SanDisk Extreme is faster than the 120GB 840 EVO and as fast as the 840 Pro, whilst costing $100.

Most of the problems you are reading are people failing to update the Bios to the newest revision. If you get the board and flash it with the newest bios (or beta) you will avoid 98% of the problems most people are having. The ASUS Z87-A or Gigabyte GA-Z87X-UD4H are having very similar problems to the ASRock. The Z87 chipset in general has been pretty iffy. By updating the Bios on these boards to the newest version, you can avoid most of the problems you read people having. I wouldn't be weary of the ASRock board it will more than likely be a strong choice that you will be pleased with because of all the extra features it offers for the money. If you are having doubts I would go with the UD4H. But in the end, you will end up with the same equivalent possibility of having a problem with all three.

The reasoning behind going with 2400MHz memory is because it costs the same or less than memory that is slower. Anywhere between 1600MHz-2400MHz memory is all within the same price range now. Going with slower memory wouldn't be logical because of the prices being so similar. Although you might have read that it is unnecessary. Most of what you are reading is misinformation. Faster memory is beneficial, not just to programs and other areas but also to games. In games it helps increase average framerates (and in newer CPU bound games, those numbers are increased pretty drastically). In most games it helps increase minimum framerates which translates to less framerate drop. In programs, you will reduce access times. In anything video or audio related you will reduce encoding times significantly. Extracting files will be quicker, and general basic computer functioning will be snappier. Add all of these benefits together, and it would seem nonsensical to go with faster memory.

thanks for taking the time to answer thoroughly.

Edit: put the build through partpicker and under compatibility notes got -

- ASRock Z87 Extreme6 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard has onboard USB 3.0 headers, but the Rosewill CHALLENGER ATX Mid Tower Case does not have front panel USB 3.0 ports.

- G.Skill Sniper Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-2400 Memory operating voltage of 1.65V exceeds the Intel Haswell CPU recommended maximum of 1.5V+5% (1.575V). This memory module may run at a reduced clock rate to meet the 1.5V voltage recommendation, or may require running at a voltage greater than the Intel recommended maximum.

thoughts?
Edited by subsonik - 9/22/13 at 5:09pm
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by subsonik View Post

thanks for taking the time to answer thoroughly.

Edit: put the build through partpicker and under compatibility notes got -

- ASRock Z87 Extreme6 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard has onboard USB 3.0 headers, but the Rosewill CHALLENGER ATX Mid Tower Case does not have front panel USB 3.0 ports.

- G.Skill Sniper Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-2400 Memory operating voltage of 1.65V exceeds the Intel Haswell CPU recommended maximum of 1.5V+5% (1.575V). This memory module may run at a reduced clock rate to meet the 1.5V voltage recommendation, or may require running at a voltage greater than the Intel recommended maximum.

thoughts?

1) The ASRock Z87 Extreme6 also includes 2 USB 2.0 Headers, which you could use for your front panel ports over the USB 3.0 headers. But really it doesn't even matter because USB 3.0 ports are backwards compatible with 2.0, just not the other way around (trying to use USB 2.0 ports with USB 3.0 devices).

2) That's just what Intel lists it's technical data spec sheet as. Meaning, they are officially only supporting 1600MHz @ 1.5-1.6v. However, Intel CPU's have been supporting memory 1.65v memory since Sandy Bridge and over 1600MHz even before that. You will probably have to run the memory at 1.6-1.65v to get 2400MHz however, this is pretty standard and I wouldn't be worried about it.

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