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Transducer Response and Source Response?

post #1 of 4
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Why are there so many transducers available for general use that can produce subsonic and supersonic frequencies if most receivers, and amplifiers, dacs / etc only have a frequency response range of 20hz - 20khz...or at least this is what I am noticing.

Basically, where is the purpose of getting a tweeter for example that can respond as high as 40khz+ or a woofer that goes as low as 10hz if they will be limited to the response of 20hz to 20khz band.
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post #2 of 4
It's meant to imply that, if the transducer will perform at those frequencies, then it will sound good.

Not knowing how much you know about audio, let's just leave it at "Advertizing nonsense".
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post #3 of 4
20Hz - 20kHz is what you see rated for most solid state receivers because this is the generally accepted range of human hearing. A few years ago I was able to hear up to about 21.5kHz, and there are plenty of people who can hear that. The average adult can usually hear only up to around 16kHz though because their hearing is so damaged. 20Hz cant really be heard but is felt, however if it is a good place to quote from because it is 20 - 20, makes the specs look nicer. Higher end equipment will rate things usually for whatever their range is that has a spread of something like +/-0.3 dB. So you can see one receiver for example that would say 14Hz - 48kHz +/- 0.3 dB, and another may say 27Hz - 36kHz +/- 0.3dB. Those same high end receivers or DAC's will usually also give a second spec that extends the range to a spread of +/- 3dB. Most tube amplifiers have a far larger quoted frequency response range, often up to 100kHz. You can't possibly hear this high, but being able to accurately reproduce higher frequencies generally means the range you can hear is reproduced very accurately and the proper rendering of the slighter higher than hearing range octaves can also mean that you are hearing the harmonics from those octaves in the ranges that you can hear.
Edited by EniGma1987 - 10/8/13 at 6:06am
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post #4 of 4
dB has nothing to do with pitch or octaves. Its a ratio, usually dealing with power. 3 dB is about 2x, so if something says '-3 dB' it means at half power.

You can easily build an amplifier that will respond as low as you want- I have a DIY amp that responds well to probably 10Hz or so, and would go to DC with a simple modification- but DC translates to speaker destruction, so I won't do that.

Likewise with high frequency- in fact, I suspect that most amplifiers will go to 30-40Khz. In the event of a major malfunction, an amplifier may make a 100Khz or more signal on its own. That usually causes tweeters to pop.


Anyway, a speaker with a 20Khz rating doesn't simply play 19.9Khz perfectly and 20.1 not at all- its a gradual falloff of output, and the given value is usually when its fallen off 50%. So a 40Khz rating doesn't mean its designed for pissing off dogs- it means its more linear through the lower frequency ranges you do care about since the rolloff isn't until later.

CD isn't capable of storing a sound above 20Khz or so, so anything above that is typically pointless. DVD and Blu-Ray can do much higher quality audio, though, and can go to much higher frequencies.
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