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De-lidding an AM3+ FX-6300

post #1 of 5
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Is it possible? Lets find out... I have a really sucky CPU and instead of throwing it away I decided to do an experiment. Time to de-lid this thing! Now this CPU can only hit 4.3GHz stable keeping within voltage and heat limits of what you are supposed to do. The max I could ever get was 4.5GHz stable and that required almost 1.6v and was running well above the max temp. This experiment is not only to see how easy it would be to de-lid an AM3+ processor but also to see what temp changes it could give and if OC potential changes. Now before you say something stupid in a post, yes I do in fact know these CPUs have the die soldered directly to the integrated heat spreader. And yes I know removing the IHS is technically supposed to kill the CPU because a lot of dumb people have tried it in the past and said so. So without further a'do, here are the pics of an already completed job and instructions on how to do this yourself:






Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)






Anyway, the procedure for doing this is relatively easy. Take your CPU out and get some foam that you can press the CPU pins into to hold them secure without bending anything. Then take a razor blade and carefully try to cut away between the PCB board and the IHS to help get the glue out and break the seal. This step really *shouldnt* matter or be important because if the heat is hot enough to melt the solder then the glue should also melt, however I found this was not the case. The glue held stronger than the solder did... Anyway, dont get the razor really deep because there are a lot of important resistors right behind the glue and if you nick one of them the CPU will be dead. Just cut in a few MM under the IHS to get about half of the glue off, the other half farther inside under the IHS will get a little bit gummy and is easy enough to break through later. Now get a couple Angle nose slip joint pliers, you will need ones that can open 2" or so. Now comes the hard part. Remove the foam since we dont want it melting onto the pins, unfortunately this next step will probably bend a few pins along the edge of your CPU because of how the pliers grip. You can bend the pins back with the razor blade once we are done with everything. Grip the CPU with the pliers at the very end so the tips of the pliers do not stick farther out than the IHS does. Make sure you have a very good grip and the CPU wont slip loose, but not so strong as to be bending the PCB board or anything. Get your other set of plaiers ready to grip the IHS as you will need to be quick on this next part.

With the CPU gripped in one hand and the pliers ready in the other, stick the processor IHS down onto the frying pan. The pan should be probably about 250-300 degrees really as that should be sufficient to melt the solder. Keep the IHS pressed onto the pan with a decent bit of force for 10 seconds. Pull it away and as quickly as possible grip the IHS with the other set of pliers and start pulling. You should hopefully get one or two sides of the IHS starting to come up off the PCB now. After a couple seconds the CPU wont be hot enough anymore though and the solder will have re-solidified. Stick the CPU back onto the pan for another 5-7 seconds and then once more grip the IHS and do some pulling. Be rough, that glue is strong stuff. This time you should be able to get the rest of the IHS loose and separated. Set the IHS aside and get a paper towel or something. Now CAREFULLY put the CPU back onto the frying pan for 2-3 seconds and then as fast as possible wipe away the remaining melted solder that was stuck to the die. Overall it should be fairly clean but there will still be traces left on the die. Not much you can do about it unless you want to get really daring with a razor blade. Chances are trying to clean off any thin layer of remaining solder will just cause you to cut into a layer of transistors in the die though and kill the CPU so I dont think it is worth the risk. Its one thing to melt some solder off and pull the IHS away, another to take a razor blade directly to the CPU die...

When you mount up the CPU into your computer again you need to be careful. If you put too much pressure onto the die from your heatsink then you will crack the core and kill the processor, but not enough pressure and you get bad thermal transfer. So just be careful and dont crank it down all the way, just till things feel snug.








So I put the CPU in my MB to do a quick test. I dont have the stock CPU heatsink mounting bracket right now which I need to mount an H100i into this tower, so I am just holding the heatsink on top of the CPU cores right now. It POST's ok but shuts down within a minute probably from thermal protection trip in the bios because I don't have a heatsink mounted right at all. I am going to try and get everything mounted up right tomorrow or Monday and do more tests but it gets through a POST and can load the bios so the CPU is at the very least 90% alive and working so it is looking good so far.

Anyway, discuss...


EDIT: also I think this is the first shot of whats going on under the IHS on an AM3+ processor.
Edited by EniGma1987 - 10/12/13 at 8:19pm
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Gaming
(17 items)
 
Gaming PC
(20 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
7700K AS Rock Z170 OC Formula Titan X Pascal 2050MHz 64GB DDR4-3200 14-14-14-34-1T 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveCooling
950 EVO m.2 OS drive 850 EVO 1TB games drive Intel 730 series 500GB games drive Custom water cooling 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Win 10 Pro x64 AMH A399U E-Element mechanical, black switches, Vortex b... EVGA G3 1kw 
CaseMouseAudioAudio
Lian-Li PC-V1000L Redragon M901 LH Labs Pulse X Infinity DAC Custom built balanced tube amp with SS diamond ... 
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MrSpeakers Alpha Prime 
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post #2 of 5
IT LIVES!!!
Nicely done! I love to see experiments like this. Looking forward to seeing how it turns out.
post #3 of 5
Why did this thread stop?

I am glad I came across it because I have a suggestion on cleaning the solder off!

USE SOLDER WICK!

If you have the CPU but are unwilling to try anything further, I have a testbed I am willing to put to use to see if we can get an improvement out of this thing.
post #4 of 5
Quote:
yes I do in fact know these CPUs have the die soldered directly to the integrated heat spreader. And yes I know removing the IHS is technically supposed to kill the CPU because a lot of dumb people have tried it in the past and said so.
It seems like sanding the lid off with a flat belt sander and then lapping may be the way to go ??
    
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX-6300 @ 4.9ghz M5A99X EVO R2.0 PNY 2gb NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 PNY DDR3-1600 9-9-9-24 2X4gb 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Intel 330 SSD Samsung HD103SI Samsung HD204UI X 2 esata externals  Western Digital WD5000AAKX  
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Optiarc DVD RW AD-7280S Cooler Master Hyper 212 plus Windows 8.1.1 pro with media center Funai 32inch LED HDTV 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Microsoft Comfort Curve 2000 Corsair CX600 Custom twin full tower, 12 - 5 1/4 bays total Logitech M510 
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post #5 of 5
That is the method we used to use for "delidding" socket 775 processors that were soldered together.

You would essentially end up with a lapped layer of solder. worked out well, however the layer of solder depicted up there ^ looks lumpy and atrocious.

I want hands on that 6300, wether they are his or someone elses, I just want to see this method work.
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