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Gaming and mouse response BIOS optimization guide for modern PC hardware - Page 13

post #121 of 3438
Thread Starter 
New thread update: PCIE sound cards are garbage

I used an Audigy 2 ZS PCI soundcard for years with no problems. I "upgraded" to the newest Soundblaster Z PCIE card a few weeks back. Immediately after starting to use the PCIE card, I noticed scrolling on webpages had much more choppiness to it, games were less fluid, more screen tearing, lower FPS in games, more input lag, flick shots felt off, etc. I just switched back to the years old Audigy 2 PCI card and everything is back to normal.

I tried using the PCIE card without Creative drivers installed (it still played sound fine without even installing drivers), and with Creative drivers, both were crap.

Just dragging a window around on desktop, there's an enormous difference in flicker between the two cards. The PCI one has zero flicker or chop while dragging the window, and the PCIE one is all stuttery. The thing causes negative issues with everything on the system from fluidity to mouse movement.
Edited by r0ach - 4/15/14 at 7:19pm
post #122 of 3438
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Edited by Tazzzz - 1/6/16 at 12:01pm
post #123 of 3438
If you are not into it, MSI mode will change many things Roach, trust me!
post #124 of 3438
Just tried the MSI mode stuff on one device, it worked, then I stupidly expanded the settings on nearly all devices at once and Windows didn't boot afterwards. tongue.gif

I had made a System Restore point before the experiments and had to use that to get it working again. Safe Mode was also not booting so System Restore was the only option.

EDIT: I found out it was the SATA controller of the board (Intel's Z77 chipset). Everything else can safely be switched to MSI for me even if it refuses to work (the USB 2.0 controller ignores it), but that SATA controller will hang at boot. It does this both while using Intel's driver and while using Microsoft's driver that comes with Win 8.
Edited by deepor - 4/16/14 at 7:45am
post #125 of 3438
Quote:
Originally Posted by deepor View Post

Just tried the MSI mode stuff on one device, it worked, then I stupidly expanded the settings on nearly all devices at once and Windows didn't boot afterwards. tongue.gif

I had made a System Restore point before the experiments and had to use that to get it working again. Safe Mode was also not booting so System Restore was the only option.

EDIT: I found out it was the SATA controller of the board (Intel's Z77 chipset). Everything else can safely be switched to MSI for me even if it refuses to work (the USB 2.0 controller ignores it), but that SATA controller will hang at boot. It does this both while using Intel's driver and while using Microsoft's driver that comes with Win 8.

Weird, as my SATA controller was already in MSI mode, and i have a Z68 chipset.. would be odd to take a step back in that regard
post #126 of 3438
Quote:
Originally Posted by Axaion View Post

Weird, as my SATA controller was already in MSI mode, and i have a Z68 chipset.. would be odd to take a step back in that regard

It's a Gigabyte board and it's probably its BIOS not working quite right from what I've seen of Gigabyte. tongue.gif Since the last post, I actually already tried a different BIOS which has a newer version of the module for the Intel SATA controller but it still doesn't want to work.

EDIT: I got that SATA device working now after installing the latest RST driver from here: http://forums.tweaktown.com/gigabyte/30530-latest-overclocking-programs-system-info-benchmarking-stability-tools.html

I found out the Microsoft driver which can do SATA AHCI in Windows 8 does not support MSI/MSI-X. That's why it wasn't working. I'm still pretty sure I had an older Intel RST driver running at some point (saw "driver provider: Intel" instead of Microsoft in the device properties) and that one also didn't work, but that might just be me not remembering right.
Edited by deepor - 4/16/14 at 1:50pm
post #127 of 3438
Quote:
Originally Posted by deepor View Post

It's a Gigabyte board and it's probably its BIOS not working quite right from what I've seen of Gigabyte. tongue.gif Since the last post, I actually already tried a different BIOS which has a newer version of the module for the Intel SATA controller but it still doesn't want to work.
Oh, well thats too bad, mine is an ASRock, never had a Gigabyte board for some reason
post #128 of 3438
i thought i was well on my way to 'killing' dpc latency, but the latency checker tells me it jumps around between 4 and ~60 and it has apparantly reached as high as 384 at some point :/

the latency seems to increase as soon as i start doing something (like using my browser).

and what looks 'worrying' to me is that the latency is not steady at all.
if i'm idling it will hang around 4-20, averagely, but every 10-20 seconds there is this sudden jump to 50-60.
these jumps get significantly higher (~300) if i'm actually doing stuff.

does this mean my setup is a mess, or is this behaviour 'typical'?
Edited by Bucake - 4/17/14 at 2:56am
post #129 of 3438
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bucake View Post

i thought i was well on my way to 'killing' dpc latency, but the latency checker tells me it jumps around between 4 and ~60 and it has apparantly reached as high as 384 at some point :/

the latency seems to increase as soon as i start doing something (like using my browser).

and what looks 'worrying' to me is that the latency is not steady at all.
if i'm idling it will hang around 4-20, averagely, but every 10-20 seconds there is this sudden jump to 50-60.
these jumps get significantly higher (~300) if i'm actually doing stuff.

does this mean my setup is a mess, or is this behaviour 'typical'?

Latency Checker is kinda useless, and the duration roach ran it for proves nothing for the stability of his system regarding DPC, in that screenshot its been running for ... 5-10 seconds max.

Try using LatencyMon and let it run for a minimum of 20 minutes.

It will alsto tell you what process causes the DPC spikes if you get any, so you can actually track down faulty drivers or hardware instead of just guessing smile.gif
post #130 of 3438
Quote:
Originally Posted by Axaion View Post

Latency Checker is kinda useless, and the duration roach ran it for proves nothing for the stability of his system regarding DPC, in that screenshot its been running for ... 5-10 seconds max.

Try using LatencyMon and let it run for a minimum of 20 minutes.

It will alsto tell you what process causes the DPC spikes if you get any, so you can actually track down faulty drivers or hardware instead of just guessing smile.gif

thanks for your (quick) reply :j much appreciated.

should i run this while 'doing my thing' (games, spotify, browser...), or while idling?
(it already appears that my nvidia drivers and directx are the biggest latency creators for me. - monitoring while typing this post)

edit: 15 minutes
20 minutes

damnit!
Edited by Bucake - 4/17/14 at 3:42am
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