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[Dailytech] Apple Patent on Touch Typing, Multitouch Upheld; Allows Ban on Most Androids - Page 8

post #71 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by CynicalUnicorn View Post

Software patents should last only three years, while mechanical devices maintain their 20 years (+/- a bit?) - problem solved! Also, public executions for Samsung and Apple lawyers. We can probably solve the debt crisis if we put it on pay per view and tax it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Running_Man_(film)
post #72 of 77
the fanboyism in this thread is astounding.
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post #73 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Domino View Post

Brain storm me convenient ways of turning on your phone pronto! Someone patent the first 3 most convenient ways! Voice activation, near sensor, and a physical button and or switch. It will be the end of all competition. lachen.gif

Apple patent incoming...

On topic;
Apple honestly is the most pathetic company on this planet. They know they make second rate phones and have to come up with a way to stop competition.

Makes me mad that a company can do this.

Brb going to patent taking a *****.
Edited by ZeSy - 10/21/13 at 9:09am
post #74 of 77
This is getting ridiculous. I wonder if there is a patent on the turning on of a light switch. It is basically the same thing. A hand movement on a device.

This is just crazy. They should be able to patent the parts in the screen that detect the finger press and stuff like that...but the actual movement of my finger on the device? How do the people in the patent office still have jobs? I know people that have submitted true patents for new ideas that got denied because it was too similar to something else when it really wasn't...and it took them over three years to be told that.
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post #75 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gigatel View Post

Newsflash: A differing opinion or point of view, expressed in words on a forum through the natural discourse of conversation, is not trolling. Learn to deal with opposing views.

Having said that, no one here is a patent expert. No one here read the 300+ page patent itself and if they did, I would find it suspect that they actually understand all of it. All anyone here has is an opinion, just like me.

I didn't want to say anything when watching the discussion in the thread you posted about this, because I wanted to give you the benefit of the doubt. But here, you've made it clear that you have a ridiculous bias.

The reason people like you get called out for trolling is because your viewpoint is both immovable and unreasonable. You are advocating anti-consumerist behavior (and news flash, you are a consumer) like it's something that should be praised, and anytime someone contradicts you, with facts no less, your only response is to simply reply, "Nope, I'm right you're wrong because I said so, I need no supporting evidence."

You are not here to have a discussion, you are here to blindly white knight Apple.

Really, this isn't even about Apple. I would get on the case of any company that won this patent. The reason Apple is getting more hate than usual, however, is that we already know why Apple wants this patent. Look at their recent history, and it doesn't take a genius to figure out that they're just trying to acquire more ammo for lawsuits. It has absolutely nothing to do with "protecting their properties." Not that anything this patent covers is their property anyways, it's much too broad. Rather, they're patenting a concept, a very vague one at that.

Lastly, yes, there are only so many ways to implement something, especially in a way that makes sense. For instance, in theory, you could have the device interpret clockwise circles for scrolling down, counterclockwise circles for scrolling up, clockwise squares for scrolling right, and counterclockwise squares for scrolling left. It's perfectly doable, but does it make sense? Is it easy to use for the consumer? I'm going to go with no.

The method we have now with simply swipe-scrolling is obviously the most effective and makes the most sense, hence why everyone uses it. Oh, but if you patent it, that automatically makes it your technology and your property now does it? According to your logic, yes. According to common sense, no.

In summation, Apple is only out to sue other companies. This has absolutely nothing to do with fending off copycats or protecting their investments, they just want an excuse to bring their competitors to court.
post #76 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flames21891 View Post

I didn't want to say anything when watching the discussion in the thread you posted about this, because I wanted to give you the benefit of the doubt. But here, you've made it clear that you have a ridiculous bias.

The reason people like you get called out for trolling is because your viewpoint is both immovable and unreasonable. You are advocating anti-consumerist behavior (and news flash, you are a consumer) like it's something that should be praised, and anytime someone contradicts you, with facts no less, your only response is to simply reply, "Nope, I'm right you're wrong because I said so, I need no supporting evidence."

You are not here to have a discussion, you are here to blindly white knight Apple.

Really, this isn't even about Apple. I would get on the case of any company that won this patent. The reason Apple is getting more hate than usual, however, is that we already know why Apple wants this patent. Look at their recent history, and it doesn't take a genius to figure out that they're just trying to acquire more ammo for lawsuits. It has absolutely nothing to do with "protecting their properties." Not that anything this patent covers is their property anyways, it's much too broad. Rather, they're patenting a concept, a very vague one at that.

Lastly, yes, there are only so many ways to implement something, especially in a way that makes sense. For instance, in theory, you could have the device interpret clockwise circles for scrolling down, counterclockwise circles for scrolling up, clockwise squares for scrolling right, and counterclockwise squares for scrolling left. It's perfectly doable, but does it make sense? Is it easy to use for the consumer? I'm going to go with no.

The method we have now with simply swipe-scrolling is obviously the most effective and makes the most sense, hence why everyone uses it. Oh, but if you patent it, that automatically makes it your technology and your property now does it? According to your logic, yes. According to common sense, no.

In summation, Apple is only out to sue other companies. This has absolutely nothing to do with fending off copycats or protecting their investments, they just want an excuse to bring their competitors to court.

The problem is, even the clockwise scrolling you mentioned is "using fingers on the display translated into actions using heuristics" or however else the patent is worded. It basically translates to "using your fingers on the screen and using programming to decipher the touches in order ot interact with the device" which is practically any possible touch screen scenario.

It's quite simply not possible to not infringe on this vague patent. This really is Apple patenting touchscreens.
post #77 of 77

This is the problem with our country and it's patent process. 

 

I can't believe I'm going to have to narrow down my choices because someone said "we'll patent a finger swipe on a touch device!". I mean, come on. Who in their right minds wouldn't come to that conclusion after using a touch screen for any length of time? It's obvious... too obvious.

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