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Event Viewer vs. Intel's ETU for reporting thermal throttling... - Page 2

post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
I don't know what to make of this. Sometimes during a stress test, I suddenly drop to stock speeds. Temps are good, maybe too good showing a max of 75C. ThrottleStop doesn't show any throttling, and Prime95 keeps running. The only way to know something has happened is to read the CPU speed in RealTemp or ThrottleStop.
post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by unclewebb View Post

Some bios versions and some software sets this register to 0x0 and some set this register to 0x8. They both mean the same thing. Clock Modulation thermal throttling is not active if this register contains either of these values. Windows is acting like some overly sensitive antivirus software because it is not interpreting the contents of this register correctly.

This register has to contain the digit 1 to the left of the digit 8. The 1 digit is what indicates thermal throttling. The 8 by itself indicates that thermal throttling will be set to 50% but only when it is enabled with the 1 digit. If the 1 doesn't exist then 25% or 50% or 75% all mean the same thing because this type of clock modulation throttling has not been turned on yet so the CPU is not being throttled.

0x18 = 50% clock modulation is enabled and active
0x08 = 50% clock modulation but it is NOT enabled and it is NOT active

Any software that writes 0x08 to that register is doing you a favor. It is making sure that your CPU is not being throttled so it can run at its full rated speed. Windows should not be complaining about that but it does.

Thanks for the details. That sounds kind of familiar. I thought I read RealTemp and other apps can be responsible of those logs, and know I know why.
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ooostephen View Post

ThrottleStop doesn't show any throttling, and Prime95 keeps running.

Can you post a ThrottleStop screen shot of that? What I tried to show is that throttling can happen where the processor reduces speed but it can also happen internally within the CPU. You need to check for both to make sure your CPU is running at its rated speed.
post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by unclewebb View Post

Can you post a ThrottleStop screen shot of that? What I tried to show is that throttling can happen where the processor reduces speed but it can also happen internally within the CPU. You need to check for both to make sure your CPU is running at its rated speed.

Here's the shot a moment after it defaulted to 3.5Ghz. I started out at 4.7Ghz as seen on the right side of ETU, and again around pass 8 it goes to 3.5.
Let me know if anything stands out.


post #15 of 18
All three programs clearly show the drop in MHz.

The default multiplier for a 4770K is 35 so when turbo boost is disabled, this CPU will run at 3500 MHz. That's the problem that you are seeing. I can't say for sure why this is happening but some motherboards are not capable of delivering enough power to the CPU socket when you are significantly overclocking and the voltage regulators on some motherboards simply overheat when stressed to this level. You could try pointing a big fan at your on board voltage regulators to see if this might be the problem. What motherboard model are you using?

You could also try using ThrottleStop. It can correct some of the more common throttling problems but if your board is throttling to protect itself, forcing it with ThrottleStop might damage your motherboard so keep that in mind.

If you are willing to risk your motherboard, adjust the Set Multiplier value in ThrottleStop to 47, uncheck BD PROCHOT, put a check mark in the Set Multiplier box and click on the Turn On button. Does that make any difference when running Prime95? What does the ThrottleStop TPL window show?

Edit: I would suggest turning off XTU and RealTemp when playing with ThrottleStop. It's best to only allow one program at a time to access the CPU registers that control the CPU.
Edited by unclewebb - 11/2/13 at 3:30pm
post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the tips. I am prone to reckless oc attempts, but I'll prob hold off on the ThrottleStop suggestions, for now. I'm using Asus Z87i-deluxe. I start out with Turbo enabled and 47 multiplier. Are you saying TurboBoost gets disabled during testing and that's why its defaulting to 3.5? Then I might try adding more voltage to TurboBoost?
post #17 of 18
Yes, something on your board is likely disabling Turbo Boost when you are pushing your setup to the limit. This can be triggered by heat or power consumption. It doesn't have to be the temperature of your CPU which is still fine. It can be the temperature of some other sensor on your board but I am guessing that this throttling is being triggered by power consumption. If this is the case, adding more voltage will increase power consumption and will likely trigger this throttling sooner.

As a CPU heats up during a stress test, power consumption tends to creep up. You can run ThrottleStop in monitoring mode with the Log File option checked so you have a clearer understanding of what the trigger point is. Keep an eye on the power consumption reading while stress testing. It might be based on that.

Asus used to do the exact same thing when the first Core i CPUs came out. They limited power consumption by disabling Turbo Boost to make sure nothing on the board would go up in smoke when doing some extreme overclocking. They were nice enough back then to release some modified bios versions for enthusiasts that are more interested in ultimate performance and not the long term durability of their motherboards.

http://www.overclock.net/t/572119/throttling-issue-asus-p6t-deluxe-solved
post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 
That helps. There was a setting called 'Thermal Monitor' I think, that's responsible for throttling the CPU in response to temps. Disabling it stopped the throttling but leaves me unprotected to temp spikes. Its a risk but so far its been worth it as I seem pretty stable at 47 with a cache ratio of 45.
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