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post #31 of 35
I am still failing to understand why anyone would EVER change the water on a silvered water system. AT ALL. The longer you run it, the better it works. copper will get just a hair oxidized, but that oxide is really tough stuff, and will be barely a micron thick. Copper water pipes last for hundreds of years. Aluminum oxide is better known as sapphire (no really!). It's even tougher and longer lasting than copper oxide, or almost anything on the planet fr that matter.. As long as you don't care if the water stays clear or not, and merely whether it cools your chips, you should be able to run it till either the pump fails or your tubing crystallizes from age. Say 20 years. I don't even see why you need to change out the copper sulphate. It will eventually stop working, but it's a CLOSED SYSTEM. Once everything in there is dead, it's sterile till you break the seal. Sure the water will pick up some oxide, lose it's oxygen and turn stinky, but it STILL WORKS FINE.
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post #32 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by bombastinator View Post

I am still failing to understand why anyone would EVER change the water on a silvered water system. AT ALL. The longer you run it, the better it works. copper will get just a hair oxidized, but that oxide is really tough stuff, and will be barely a micron thick. Copper water pipes last for hundreds of years. Aluminum oxide is better known as sapphire (no really!). It's even tougher and longer lasting than copper oxide, or almost anything on the planet fr that matter.. As long as you don't care if the water stays clear or not, and merely whether it cools your chips, you should be able to run it till either the pump fails or your tubing crystallizes from age. Say 20 years. I don't even see why you need to change out the copper sulphate. It will eventually stop working, but it's a CLOSED SYSTEM. Once everything in there is dead, it's sterile till you break the seal. Sure the water will pick up some oxide, lose it's oxygen and turn stinky, but it STILL WORKS FINE.

Well, you drain copper sulphate loops every 6 months to a year because copper sulphate decreases loops Ph. You need to put in a drop every month or so to keep it as an active biocide. After over half a year it can be difficult to keep a balanced Ph level, while still popping in that drop. I can see what you're saying about the silver thing though, once it's dead it's gone. Maybe the same applies to a CuSo4, but over cautious is a good thing to be. It's their loop, so if they go a bit further than you would to be careful there's no big issue there.

You should also note, that most systems are permanently closed. You will lose some water over time, and you do need to top off your loop from time to time.
Edited by ZytheEKS - 11/12/13 at 7:00pm
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post #33 of 35
Quote:
You should also note, that most systems are permanently closed. You will lose some water over time, and you do need to top off your loop from time to time.

Unless you have gas permeable tubing. You're not losing water, you're losing the air dissolved in the water. Once the air is gone from the water it becomes a better heat conductor and working fluid (and significantly heavier by volume. There's really quite a bit of gas dissolved in most water). In the pipe-fitting industry it's known as "dead" water. It smells chemically and bad. It's not good to drink, but it's great to heat your house (or cool your computer) with.

With a hot water heating system they put a valve from your water line directly into the system so there won't be any air getting in. This does pose a problem for a cooling loop though. You don't want to hook it up to your faucet.


Off the top of my head, an idea to solve this is maybe a ball valve on top of the system. when you want to bleed out the waste air, put a water source on top of the ball valve like a big tube, fill it with water 9may want to add that drop of biocide to it or boil it first or something), then open the tap. The air will bubble out, new (and sadly gas filled) water will trickle in. close the ball valve, tip the water out, and remove the hose. it takes a few months for the gas to leave the water, so you have to do it a few times.

A cool example of this effect is if you ever get ahold of old cold war era nuclear emergency rations they've got canned water in them. The stuff generally gets stuffed in some library basement ad sat for fifty years so all the gas dissolved out. if you shake the can, it rattles. The water doesn't want to reabsorb the gas, so it bangs around on the inside of the can. (and no you don't want to drink it)
Edited by bombastinator - 11/12/13 at 8:59pm
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post #34 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by bombastinator View Post



Unless you have gas permeable tubing. You're not losing water, you're losing the air dissolved in the water. Once the air is gone from the water it becomes a better heat conductor and working fluid (and significantly heavier by volume. There's really quite a bit of gas dissolved in most water). In the pipe-fitting industry it's known as "dead" water. It smells chemically and bad. It's not good to drink, but it's great to heat your house (or cool your computer) with.

With a hot water heating system they put a valve from your water line directly into the system so there won't be any air getting in. This does pose a problem for a cooling loop though. You don't want to hook it up to your faucet.


Off the top of my head, an idea to solve this is maybe a ball valve on top of the system. when you want to bleed out the waste air, put a water source on top of the ball valve like a big tube, fill it with water 9may want to add that drop of biocide to it or boil it first or something), then open the tap. The air will bubble out, new (and sadly gas filled) water will trickle in. close the ball valve, tip the water out, and remove the hose. it takes a few months for the gas to leave the water, so you have to do it a few times.

A cool example of this effect is if you ever get ahold of old cold war era nuclear emergency rations they've got canned water in them. The stuff generally gets stuffed in some library basement ad sat for fifty years so all the gas dissolved out. if you shake the can, it rattles. The water doesn't want to reabsorb the gas, so it bangs around on the inside of the can. (and no you don't want to drink it)

You see that's all great and grand thinking, but it's MUCH easier for most people to just pop a biocide in there... Having a drain valve or a QDC drain setup makes draining and refilling really easy.

Ease of use, and expense are the game here.
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post #35 of 35
I last drained/filled my loop dec of last year and in 11 months i only added a bottle cap of water to the loop its crystal clear still, in the 4 years i have had my loop id drain it maybe every 6-8 months usualy when i was planing on taking something apart or adding a new part and it always came out clean smelled better then the tap water also lol i use a silver coil in my bay res.
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