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Originally Posted by John Timmer 
The motor protein used in these experiments is called kinesin. Each molecule of kinesin has a section where it binds cargo and a "head" that sticks to the microtubules. When two of these molecules stick together, the heads act a bit like feet, taking alternating steps along the microtubule, each stride advancing the kinesin 8nm down its length. Each of these steps uses a little bit of energy in the form of ATP. The process is shown in detail in the video below.

In the new paper, the authors performed a clever trick to get kinesin to assemble a transportation network made of microtubules. Rather than having each pair of kinesin molecules linked to a cargo-carrying domain, they linked them to another pair of kinesin molecules. Typically, this will link two different microtubules together. Given a mix of these kinesins and microtubules, you'd get a complicated mesh that's crosslinked by the kinesins.

With DNA and proteins, researchers build transit for lugging molecular cargo


For some reason this is all I can think of while reading this article.
Dynamix
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Dynamix
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7-860 Gigabyte GA-P55A-UD4P Radeon 7970 Corsair Domintor Twins + Other = 16 Gb 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
WD Caviar Black, 500gb OCZ Solid 3 Sony Optiarc Corsair H50 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Windows 7 Ultimate Samsung P2570HD + Other Logitech G110 Corsair 750W HX 
CaseMouse
Antec p183 Logitech MX Revolution 
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Reply