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Help tips on building a new gaming computer

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I know that I maybe in a wrong place to post this so I do apologize for it, could not find a different place where people asked for tips on building new rigs. Anyway I was looking to build a new computer (gaming computer) that can run next gen games on at-least high settings like TW3 and all that. There is a budget but not sure where it is, my current list stands at $1,200 after taxes/rebates DO NOT WANT TO EXCEED IT lower it if possible. I just want to make sure I buy the necessary parts and not over spend. I am not looking to overclock my computer or anything like that just for simple uses like gaming and for solidworks/autocad. If you guys have better suggestions please post a website link to them so I know what you are talking about because I am not a big computer wizz when it comes to technicalities. I appreciate your feedback! thumb.gif

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131819&nm_mc=OTC-pr1c3grabb3r&cm_mmc=OTC-pr1c3grabb3r-_-Motherboards+-+Intel-_-ASUS-_-13131819

http://www.amazon.com/Intel-Core-i5-3470-Quad-Core-Processor/dp/B0087EVHVW/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1383270679&sr=8-4&keywords=Core+i5+3570k

http://www.amazon.com/Corsair-3x4GB-Desktop-Memory-CMX12GX3M3A1333C9/dp/B004F9FKNY/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1383325140&sr=8-8&keywords=ddr3+12gb+ram

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA2W00ZD1577

http://www.amazon.com/Samsung-Electronics-EVO-Series-2-5-Inch-MZ-7TE120BW/dp/B00E3W15P0/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1383313674&sr=8-3&keywords=Samsung+ssd+840+evo

http://www.amazon.com/Corsair-Builder-Watt-EPS%C2%A0-CX500/dp/B0092ML0MY/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1384312486&sr=1-1&keywords=500+watt+power+supply

http://www.amazon.com/ASUS-GeForce-GTX-670-DC2-2GD5-GTX670-DC2-2GD5/dp/B0081IFO2C/ref=sr_1_5?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1383272237&sr=1-5&keywords=nvidia+670+gtx

http://www.amazon.com/Lite-On-Super-AllWrite-Layer-Drive/dp/B002YIG9AQ/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1383271268&sr=8-2&keywords=disk+drive

http://www.amazon.com/Rosewill-Gaming-Computer-THOR-V2/dp/B0058P5S9A/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1384312421&sr=8-2&keywords=full+tower+case
post #2 of 7
Okay, let's go through these components one at a time.

MOBO (ASUS P8Z77-V PRO) - Why have you chosen this motherboard? It is running on a (ever so slightly) old chipset, and is not the *newest* type if that's what you want. I assume you do. X87 motherboards are basically the same, but will run the newest 1150 Haswell processors which are slightly faster. You have chosen the right brand though. I bought and MSI MOBO and am not as happy with it as I was with my old ASUS, They are very stable motherboards. I suggest something like this. It's slightly more expensive, but I have heard nothing but good things about it.

CPU (i5-3470) - This is overclock.net so I am basically required to say that you should get a k processor (iX-XXX0k) as you can overclock those ones. They are only slightly more expensive, but worth your time if you have it. Intel is the way to go for gaming (I swapped over from AMD recently - so much better). I recommend this. I have it and it's working well. Remember to make sure the socket (in this case, 1150, in yours 1155) on your MOBO matches your CPU.

RAM (Corsair XMS3 12GB (3x4GB) DDR3 1333 MHz) - I can honestly say that I have never heard of this. But I used to own a 3-pack of ram, and it never went down very well. Try to stick to either two or three sticks of ram in your system. Most motherboards are dual / quad channel (2 or 4) nowdays, and very few run tri-channel very well. Corsair is a good brand, but for RAM, most people go G.Skill. I recommend these. So many people use them and swear by them, and they are made for gaming, unlike these corsair ones appear to be. I myself run Trident-X's, which are a few steps up from these, but much more expensive.

HD (WD Black 1TB) - this seems like a good choice to me. I had a WD green, with all of my stuff on it, but it stopped working once I swapped to OS to my SSD, so now I just run a 1TB seagate, which seems to be working well. Hard drives are hard to mess up, just don't go too cheap and you should be good. I do recommend a 2TB hard drive if you want to install EVERY game on it (like I do), as it usually takes up a fair bit of space, and transferring Terabytes of data between hard drives is always a slow process.

SSD (Samsung 840 Evo-Series 120Gb) - Good choice. I regret buying my cheap kingston SSD, as I think it's about to bust. Samsung seem to be leading the market in SSDs at the moment, and 120Gb will easily hold your OS and any programs you want. I'd transfer my steam folder (or games) to the big, slow hard drive though. Except, that is, for the ones you play a lot. Or you could really run this however you like. Just plan things out first.

PSU (Corsair CX 500 Watt) - Good choice again. You're getting better at this. If you want to spend a bit more money, the Corsair TX series is a little bit better, and a higher wattage will allow your system to survive a few upgrades in the future. I am using this, which is working perfectly - no issues whatsoever.

GPU (ASUS GTX670) - Another great choice, but you appear to have slipped back into the previous generation graphics cards. The 700 series are slightly newer tech and are more likely to be supported better later on. In the same price range, I reccommend this one. They're basically the same performance and all, just this one is slightly newer tech.

DVD Reader (El Cheapo) - Exactly what I'd do. Even if I was building the best computer I could think up, with no price restrictions, I'd still just get a cheap and cheerful DVD reader. You don't need an R/W drive, just R will do for getting information off of disks (the W is for write). $20 and you get to install things so much faster than downloading? Might as well. Also useful for installing operating systems and reinstalling motherboard drivers (My motherboard used to have to have a LAN driver installed before it could connect to the internet. The LAN driver was on a disc).

Case (I can see that you just searched for "Full tower case") - If you aren't planning on watercooling, this might be a better option. It is a High Air Flow (HAF) model from coolermaster. I have the HAF X myself, planning to watercool. I don't see any reason to get a full tower case if you don't plan on watercooling, you just don't need all the room. If you are planning on watercooling, then you might need to up your budget on this one. I hear that the NZXT switch 810 is a great full-tower case, and it looks sexy. If you don't care about seeing your components, there are plenty of cheap full-tower cases out there that will do that. But I recommend not skimping on the case - it's what everyone sees as your computer. If it looks amazing, people will think it runs amazingly. If it looks like a *****box, people will think it performs accordingly.

That's it. If you care about noise, I recommend investing in a fan controller. If you would like to overclock in the future, I recommend a full tower case and a k edition processor. And if you really have the money to throw around (an extra $100+), also grab an aftermarket CPU cooler (either air or all-in-one watercooling unit like the Corsair H100).
post #3 of 7
I agree with USER5 on many of his points.

For the motherboard and CPU, definitely go with the latest generation stuff in socket 1150 and not 1155.

For graphics card, GTX 760 should be your choice over the older GTX 670.

Optical drives are commodities that are rarely used these days, but still useful. Get the cheapest. Alternately, you can get an external drive. I have one and find it useful because I have a number of notebooks (ultrabook style) which do not have optical drives. Simple solution is one external for the whole household.

SSD is a decent choice. There are many other good choices as well. Don't let the "cheap Kingston SSD" scare you. Most of those were the old SATA II drives, plus the more recent V200. Kingston has much better drives, such as the V+200 (that + makes all the difference), V300, HyperX 3k, etc. Corsair has the Force and Neutron series which are good. Any model Plextor should be good. Intel 330 is good. Seagate 600, Crucial M500, Toshiba Q series, Sandisk Extreme series... list goes on. Here's the tip on getting the most for your money out of SSDs. Buy the biggest capacity you can afford that is on sale at the cheapest price which isn't a "crappy" SSD. Got that? thumb.gif "Crappy" means it is either significantly slower than the competition (all the good ones are nearly limited by SATA 6Gbps) or there are some serious performance deficits (like the aforementioned Kingston V200 without the +). Yeah, avoid those. Cheapest price, because sale pricing on SSDs have always been extremely volatile. You can have huge swings in price day to day, and what may be the best choice today may not be tomorrow when the next Newegg email blast goes out. You may not get your #1 choice or the "fastest" SSD this way, but seriously you can't tell without a lot of benchmarking, plus since there are limited controllers on the market, quite a few different brands even benchmark the same. If you can't tell, does it really matter which one you buy? Well, your wallet knows. For good sale pricing, a decent 120/128GB SSD should run around $80, and 240/256GB should run around $150.

For HDD, I'd say go with the cheapest 7200RPM drive that is a current model. The WD Black drives are good drives, but they fetch a huge premium based on their reputation and the longer warranty. Neither of those guarantees you don't get a bad drive (from any company). Take a look at your link and read the user reviews. 19% gave the WD Black 1/5 eggs, and top review said he got 2 DOA. Performance-wise, you won't notice much difference.

If you like the CX500 PSU, keep an eye out at Newegg. It was on sale recently for around $30 after rebate and with free shipping. They have this kind of deal really often.

For RAM, you want a dual channel kit. Socket 1366 is triple channel and socket 2011 is quad channel. All other common platforms (socket 1156, 1155, 1150, 775, AM3, AM2, FM1, FM2) are dual channel. You'd want the cheapest kit you can find that is DDR3-1600 at 1.5v. That's it! Whether or not it has a fancy heatspreader or heatsink does not matter.

Let me ask a question. Are you (UberMonsterIII) ever going to go dual graphics cards or more drives than your motherboard can handle? If not, consider micro ATX. You'll want to make this decision before buying case/motherboard, since both have to be micro ATX. What you get is a smaller system, rather than an ATX system which is just a big empty box. Check out the Cooler Master N200 at around $46 shipped. It isn't the only possible choice, but it is cheap, will hold all your components and then some, and has great airflow.
Main home rig
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i5-3570K ASRock Z77E-ITX GeForce GTX 670 8GB Samsung DDR3 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Intel 330 240GB SSD, Crucial M4 256GB mSATA SSD... Samsung DVDRW CoolIt Eco Windows 7 Home Premium x64 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Samsung 305T Plus, Dell 2005FPW Cooler Master QuickFire Pro mechanical keyboard Rosewill Capstone 450W Lian Li PC-Q11B 
MouseMouse PadAudio
Logitech MX518 Allsop Metal Onkyo TX-SR505 receiver, Polk bookshelf speaker... 
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Main home rig
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i5-3570K ASRock Z77E-ITX GeForce GTX 670 8GB Samsung DDR3 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Intel 330 240GB SSD, Crucial M4 256GB mSATA SSD... Samsung DVDRW CoolIt Eco Windows 7 Home Premium x64 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Samsung 305T Plus, Dell 2005FPW Cooler Master QuickFire Pro mechanical keyboard Rosewill Capstone 450W Lian Li PC-Q11B 
MouseMouse PadAudio
Logitech MX518 Allsop Metal Onkyo TX-SR505 receiver, Polk bookshelf speaker... 
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post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zap View Post

...
For graphics card, GTX 760 should be your choice over the older GTX 670.

...

GTX670 has more cuda cores, it will be more powerfull if you oc it to equal or higher core clock. But price/performance the GTX 760 is the winner in most regions. With the new pricedrops I would recommend a GTX770 if you play 3D demanding games, otherwise the gtx760/670 are adequate.

I agree on all the rest of your post thumb.gif

Go for some 2x4Gb 1600Mhz (or higher if the price is right) ram, 'normal' 1150 and 1155 motherboards are dual channel. This will save you some money

That's a normal but decent gaming build, post at a PSU thread to check if that PSU is good quality, otherwise look for another PSU!

SSD 840 evo is good value for money. TLC memory has proven to be adequate in terms of lifetime.
Mine
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 6700k Asus Z170 gaming pro Palit Super Jetstream GTX 1080 Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB 2800Mhz CL14 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
Crucial M4 128GB crucial mx100 256Gb Seagate 7200.14 2TB Sony Optiarc AD-7261S 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
Cryorig H5 universal Noiseblocker NB-BlackSilentPro PL-PS 120mm (2x) Noiseblocker NB-Blacksilent XK2 140mm (2x) Noiseblocker NB-BlackSilentPro PL2 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Windows 10 pro Asus VG248QE Logitech G610 brown Cooler Master Silent Pro M600 
CaseMouseAudio
Nexus Prominent R Zowie FK1 Asus Xonar D2/PM 
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Mine
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 6700k Asus Z170 gaming pro Palit Super Jetstream GTX 1080 Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB 2800Mhz CL14 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
Crucial M4 128GB crucial mx100 256Gb Seagate 7200.14 2TB Sony Optiarc AD-7261S 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
Cryorig H5 universal Noiseblocker NB-BlackSilentPro PL-PS 120mm (2x) Noiseblocker NB-Blacksilent XK2 140mm (2x) Noiseblocker NB-BlackSilentPro PL2 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Windows 10 pro Asus VG248QE Logitech G610 brown Cooler Master Silent Pro M600 
CaseMouseAudio
Nexus Prominent R Zowie FK1 Asus Xonar D2/PM 
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post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
I appreciate your feedback guys and to answer (Zap) no, I'm not going to overclock anything really just want to build it and that's it. I know the full tower case might be too big because I will not be using it for its full potential (water cooling and all that) but I have a mid tower case right now and its just all so cramped in there...So for $100 is not that bat imo really. But I updated my list and it adds up to $1,110.00 after taxes and rebates so thanks so much you guys!!!!! biggrin.gif
post #6 of 7
no overclocking: so get a non-K version of an i5 CPU
Mine
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 6700k Asus Z170 gaming pro Palit Super Jetstream GTX 1080 Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB 2800Mhz CL14 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
Crucial M4 128GB crucial mx100 256Gb Seagate 7200.14 2TB Sony Optiarc AD-7261S 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
Cryorig H5 universal Noiseblocker NB-BlackSilentPro PL-PS 120mm (2x) Noiseblocker NB-Blacksilent XK2 140mm (2x) Noiseblocker NB-BlackSilentPro PL2 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Windows 10 pro Asus VG248QE Logitech G610 brown Cooler Master Silent Pro M600 
CaseMouseAudio
Nexus Prominent R Zowie FK1 Asus Xonar D2/PM 
  hide details  
Reply
Mine
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 6700k Asus Z170 gaming pro Palit Super Jetstream GTX 1080 Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB 2800Mhz CL14 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
Crucial M4 128GB crucial mx100 256Gb Seagate 7200.14 2TB Sony Optiarc AD-7261S 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
Cryorig H5 universal Noiseblocker NB-BlackSilentPro PL-PS 120mm (2x) Noiseblocker NB-Blacksilent XK2 140mm (2x) Noiseblocker NB-BlackSilentPro PL2 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Windows 10 pro Asus VG248QE Logitech G610 brown Cooler Master Silent Pro M600 
CaseMouseAudio
Nexus Prominent R Zowie FK1 Asus Xonar D2/PM 
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post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
To (TiezZ BE) thanks man i over looked that part from the other guys post thanks i went with yours.
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