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Water Loop pH adjustments - Page 2

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by OwaN View Post

testing the alkalinity is the same as testing the pH, its just two ways of saying the same thing. Typically pools are alkaline because they're maintained with chlorine (alkaline), so I guess the phrase "testing the alkalinity" became common for that application. pH/Acidity/alkalinity is just a measurement of the H+ ion concentration

I don't know anything specifically about buffering the pH in a WC loop or its supposed benefits, but sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) would buffer slightly alkaline (8-ish). That said, I can't imagine loop pH dropping low enough to cause corrosion issues. Anywhere in the 6-9 range should be perfectly safe.

A bicarb isn't meant to be used to increase pH, it's meant to flush your loop before you fill to neutralize the pH before you fill. Loops do have an issue with low pH, as common biocides can lower the pH, fairly drastically if you don't use it as directed. It's not advised to bring your loop above 8.5, it won't have issues with corrosion at that point, but it does promote scaling so any biocides, dyes, etc. will be prone to depositing themselves throughout your loop.
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post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZytheEKS View Post

A bicarb isn't meant to be used to increase pH, it's meant to flush your loop before you fill to neutralize the pH before you fill. Loops do have an issue with low pH, as common biocides can lower the pH, fairly drastically if you don't use it as directed. It's not advised to bring your loop above 8.5, it won't have issues with corrosion at that point, but it does promote scaling so any biocides, dyes, etc. will be prone to depositing themselves throughout your loop.

Yes, but bicarb can also be used to buffer pH at around 8. Or you could use a phosphate buffer to get it closer to 7

The only thing I'd say about the biocides lowering pH is that you should be careful trying to buffer the pH back up, as it may reduce the effectiveness of the biocide.
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by OwaN View Post

testing the alkalinity is the same as testing the pH, its just two ways of saying the same thing. Typically pools are alkaline because they're maintained with chlorine (alkaline), so I guess the phrase "testing the alkalinity" became common for that application. pH/Acidity/alkalinity is just a measurement of the H+ ion concentration

I don't know anything specifically about buffering the pH in a WC loop or its supposed benefits, but sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) would buffer slightly alkaline (8-ish). That said, I can't imagine loop pH dropping low enough to cause corrosion issues. Anywhere in the 6-9 range should be perfectly safe.

Not exactly.

Testing pH is a test of the Potential Hydrogen (how acidic) your water is (scale of 0-14).

Total alkalinity is a test of disolved alkaline substance content in your water (ability of water to neutralize an acid). This is measured in a scale of ppm.
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