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post #321 of 349
Quote:
Originally Posted by pauldovi View Post
DDR2-800 does 800,000,000 cycles per second. Latencies of 5-5-5-15 add up to 30 cycles per operation of latency.
I said "a bit" for a reason. However it's not exactly how you're describing it.
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post #322 of 349
Quote:
Originally Posted by Intervention View Post
How did you memory die, OC too much?
I don't know. It was running 805Mhz on 2,25V with 4-4-4-10 timings. At the time i was browsing with firefox and had Need for speed alt-tabbed to the background.

But I received my new memory today and it works. Haven't really oc'ed it yet.
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post #323 of 349
Thread Starter 
This thread should be stickied, and have its named changed to

"General Banter About RAM Speeds and Timings: What Works and What Doesn't"
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post #324 of 349
[ontopic]
Wiii, who needs Dominators

http://valid.x86-secret.com/show_oc?id=159596

[/ontopic]
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post #325 of 349
I'd test more but my asus took a dump. Only boots with 1gb of RAM and insists on running my video card at pci-e x1.


^^^^ASUS FTL

I still hold the record of ddr2-1280. Crucial Ballistix FTW, and they were only $279
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post #326 of 349
My understanding of clocks and latencies, which I came to when oc-ing my memory, is that timings are just as important as the clock.

Let's assume your memory is running at 800MHz, with timings of 5-5-5-15. So, it takes 30 clocks to act on a command, locate the requested data, and transfer the requested data. In this case, it takes 37.5 nanoseconds per command. It's this time that we want as low as possible, really.

As clock speed goes up, and timings stay constant, the memory must undertake each command in less and less time. Eventually, it simply can't do it in the allocated time, and instability occurs. So, timings are loosened, giving the memory more time to undertake commands. Or voltage is increased, giving the memory 'more energy' (an energy drink, in a way).

Dual channel probably cuts times in half, but there's still a very strong relationship between timings and clocks. A also know there are a lot more timings.
post #327 of 349
Quote:
Originally Posted by thealmightyone View Post
My understanding of clocks and latencies, which I came to when oc-ing my memory, is that timings are just as important as the clock.

Let's assume your memory is running at 800MHz, with timings of 5-5-5-15. So, it takes 30 clocks to act on a command, locate the requested data, and transfer the requested data. In this case, it takes 37.5 nanoseconds per command. It's this time that we want as low as possible, really.

As clock speed goes up, and timings stay constant, the memory must undertake each command in less and less time. Eventually, it simply can't do it in the allocated time, and instability occurs. So, timings are loosened, giving the memory more time to undertake commands. Or voltage is increased, giving the memory 'more energy' (an energy drink, in a way).

Dual channel probably cuts times in half, but there's still a very strong relationship between timings and clocks. A also know there are a lot more timings.
You are very correct in your analysis that you want your latency duration as small as possible. However, the final goal is that you want the most data transfers per second. So let me show you some math!

DDR2-800 with 4-4-4-12 timings causes 30 nano seconds worth of latencies per data transfer.

DDR2-1200 with 5-5-5-15 timings causes 25 nano seconds worth of latencies per data transfer.

So, not only does DDR2-1200 have less latencies in terms of time, it also can complete per data transfers per second because of its higher number of cycles.
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post #328 of 349
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Intervention View Post
I still hold the record of ddr2-1280. Crucial Ballistix FTW, and they were only $279
No you don't silly.

http://valid.x86-secret.com/show_oc?id=166033

Code:
 PassMark(TM) PerformanceTest 6.1 (http://www.passmark.com)
Results generated on:  Thursday, February 08, 2007


Benchmark Results

Test Name: This Computer
Memory - Allocate Small Block: 2858.2
Memory - Read Cached: 2233.8
Memory - Read Uncached: 2196.3
Memory - Write: 2070.6
Memory - Large RAM: 767.0
Memory Mark: 748.6
PassMark Rating: 134.8

System information: This Computer
CPU Manufacturer: GenuineIntel
Number of CPU: 1
 (2 Core(s)/CPU, 1 Logical(s)/Core)
CPU Type: Intel(R) Core(TM)2 CPU          6600  @ 2.40GHz
CPU Speed: 2887.3 MHz
Cache size: Unknown
O/S: Windows XP  (WIN32)
Total RAM: 2046.5 MB.
Available RAM: 1700.0 MB.
Video settings: 1024x768x32
Video driver:
 DESCRIPTION: NVIDIA GeForce 7950 GT
 MANUFACTURER: GeForce 7950 GT
 BIOS: Version 5.71.22.42.77
 DATE: 10/05/06
Drive Letter: C
Total Disk Space: 195.3 GBytes
Cluster Size: 4.0 KBytes
File system: NTFS
Downloaded cpu-z and this, benchmarked, and posted all on 1283mhz.

*edit* Whoops! Forgot to push my cpu to 3.5GHz. I was wondering why everything was so low...
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post #329 of 349
Quote:
Originally Posted by pauldovi View Post
You are very correct in your analysis that you want your latency duration as small as possible. However, the final goal is that you want the most data transfers per second. So let me show you some math!

DDR2-800 with 4-4-4-12 timings causes 30 nano seconds worth of latencies per data transfer.

DDR2-1200 with 5-5-5-15 timings causes 25 nano seconds worth of latencies per data transfer.

So, not only does DDR2-1200 have less latencies in terms of time, it also can complete per data transfers per second because of its higher number of cycles.
Too bad the latencies at 4-4-4-xx DDR1000 dive well below that of 1200 5-5-5-15 Paul. Your point is taken, but still, no one will realistically only be able to run 4-4-4-at 800 and with the same ram be able to run 5-5-5- at 1200.
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post #330 of 349
Thread Starter 
http://valid.x86-secret.com/show_oc.php?id=166039

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