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post #31 of 36
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CM Phaedrus View Post

It doesn't matter which side of the PCB the wires come in from, as long as they go to the correct pad (hole).

Quote:
Originally Posted by larymoencurly View Post

The quality of the soldering says SuperFlower doesn't deserve much respect for its manufacturing standards. The solder joint that you melted looks good enough, but the 2 factory soldered joints on the left are cracked or grossly underfilled and need repair. That PSU should have never left the factory in that condition.

Does the wire have to actually go into the hole or is it enough if the Red & black wires just get soldered to the solder blobs?

Also Phaedrus on another forum you recommended me the BC846B transistor, I haven't yet ordered it but soon going to.
Do you think I should order some other transistors aswell as a backup incase BC846B is not the correct one for this PSU?
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post #32 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by grandpatzer View Post

Does the wire have to actually go into the hole or is it enough if the Red & black wires just get soldered to the solder blobs?
Attaching the wires to the solder blobs is enough.
post #33 of 36
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by larymoencurly View Post

Attaching the wires to the solder blobs is enough.

So I have been suggested a transistor which seems like he knew was the correct one.
Are these correct steps for me now?

I have ordered the transistor, I should have it nextweek for soldering smile.gif

I want to be sure to have tested as good as I can before installing my PC components to the PSU, so besides these steps are there others to take?

1: Solder and assemble PSU
2: plug into wall PSU and with multimeter measure ATX 24pin Black + Purple, result should be between 4.75 and 5.25V
3: Measure Yellow and Black, should get 12v
4. Red and Black 5V
5. Orange and Black 3,3V
6. Install a fan and harddrive to PSU see if they start.
7. install PSU into PC?
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post #34 of 36
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by larymoencurly View Post

Attaching the wires to the solder blobs is enough.

I finally recieved the transistor and soldered it in, bad news seems when I measure with multimeter I'm not able to get correct readings... only Black purple gives me good readings:
Black Purple: 5.17v on level 20v on multimeter.

Black Red on level 2000m: 0019
Black Red on level 20v: -0.02

Orange black level 200m: 00.5

I also measured Green Black I believe that one was 4.79.

It was difficult soldering the Transistor but I think it's propably wrong transistor because it was physicaly smaller then the LG transistors seen on the PCB

Edited by grandpatzer - 12/17/13 at 8:57pm
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post #35 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by hambone96 View Post

If its been unplugged for a couple of days, the charge is gone and there will be little to no risk of electrocution.

    This is correct.  Usually 2 minutes is enough.  10 minutes to be safe.  You can also discharge the capacitors in <1 second if you press the power button on your PC immediately after unplugging the PSU.  The computer fans should jerk (or rev), and the PSU is discharged.  Just like that.  Pressing the power button again will not accomplish anything—the motherboard now has no power and is dead to the world. wink.gif
 
 
    Oh please no.  That thread is chock full of superstitious garbage.  It is so bad that I may resurrect it even though it is ~6 years old (actually, the thread should simply be deleted because it contains so much misinformation). 

    I'm an advanced electronics hobbyist and I've serviced dozens of PSUs without incident.  I've even worked on several live.  Here are several reasons why PSUs can't hold a charge for long:
  1. Every single one of the PSUs that I've serviced (I've serviced some really old ones, and some new ones) have bleeder resistors across the high voltage capacitors.  The sole purpose of these resistors is to ensure that the capacitors discharge fully some time after the PSU is unplugged.  Those resistors alone will ensure that the capacitors are discharged to safe voltages in less than an hour in practically all cases.
  2. The 5vSB switcher runs all the time, and it will usually discharge those capacitors within 2 – 200 seconds after the PSU is unplugged.  When this happens, most PSUs will emit a quiet "shriek" sound as the 5vSB switcher ramps to full power in an attempt to maintain a 5v output as the input voltage drops.  You can test this externally with a multimeter by measuring the voltage on the 5vSB output on the 24-pin motherboard connector.  When the discharge occurs, the 5vSB line will drop from 5v to 0v.  At his point, the high voltage capacitors will have less than 20v in each—not going to hurt you unless you puncture skin.
  3. The main switcher circuit has a quiescent power draw, even when it is off.  This will also contribute to the speed that the capacitors discharge.

    If you see anyone compare the danger of shock from a PSU to a CRT tube, be aware that they don't know what they are talking about.  There is no comparison.  CRTs are operating at voltages in the 20,000 to 40,000v range, whereas the highest voltage you should ever see in a computer PSU should be <1000v.  In CRTs, the voltage is so high that they don't have a bleeder resistor on it to drain away the high voltage because they want to have few as possible arcing points; and also, even the largest bleeder resistor would significantly increase power consumption.
 
Edited by Techie007 - 12/18/13 at 8:25am
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post #36 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by grandpatzer View Post

I finally recieved the transistor and soldered it in, bad news seems when I measure with multimeter I'm not able to get correct readings... only Black purple gives me good readings:
Black Purple: 5.17v on level 20v on multimeter.

Black Red on level 2000m: 0019
Black Red on level 20v: -0.02

Orange black level 200m: 00.5

I also measured Green Black I believe that one was 4.79.

It was difficult soldering the Transistor but I think it's propably wrong transistor because it was physicaly smaller then the LG transistors seen on the PCB
Quote:
Originally Posted by grandpatzer View Post

I finally recieved the transistor and soldered it in, bad news seems when I measure with multimeter I'm not able to get correct readings... only Black purple gives me good readings:
Black Purple: 5.17v on level 20v on multimeter.

Black Red on level 2000m: 0019
Black Red on level 20v: -0.02

Orange black level 200m: 00.5

I also measured Green Black I believe that one was 4.79.

It was difficult soldering the Transistor but I think it's probably wrong transistor because it was physicaly smaller then the LG transistors seen on the PCB
I'm assuming you've tried connecting the green wire to the black wire to turn on the PSU. I think you'll have to check all the other small transistors and any diodes. (I don't know if those black T4X9 parts are diodes or capacitors). The LM324 could be the fan controller or could be part of the over/under voltage protection. It's a cheap, common chip.
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