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[Steam] SteamOS: It's here! - Page 37  

post #361 of 382
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teplous View Post

If i have windows 8.1 installed on an ssd, and 2 striped data drives, and an open unused drive
1) ssd OS
2) data drive 1
3) data drive 2
4) unused drive

if i were to remove 1, 2, and 3, install steam os on 4, then put 1, 2, and 3 back after the installation
would the first three drives work just as they used to? and remain separate from the steam OS?

Or you could just throw your Windows Steam into auto start in Big Picture mode and save yourself the headache. If you have a working Windows computer with Steam installed, you get all the same features that SteamOS will include. But you also get to keep your Windows game library as well. SteamOS isn't really meant for dual booting, it's meant as either it's own standalone operating system -or- a supplemental extension of your desktop ( streaming to a local computer elsewhere, such as the living room as Steam has used for all their advertising ) free or charge ( not required to buy a $100 Windows license ).

Now, if you don't mind losing your Windows games just to install SteamOS for no real reason whatsoever, then to answer your question yes. But I would honestly leave the other drives in and set the 4th drive as the boot priority so that grub detects your Windows drives and sets up the boot loader properly allowing you to choose on start up.

But honestly, I would just save yourself the headache if you aren't used to Linux or Dual Booting then it's not for you right now. Remember SteamOS is still very much Alpha / Beta stage and things are going to continue to change until it's final release. Do expect bugs, do expect troubleshooting, do expect to have headaches if you've not used Linux before.

I would much rather suggest to install Ubuntu or Mint instead as they'll be much easier to dive into requiring little to no real troubleshooting while still providing you with Steam. Remember, SteamOS is just Debian with Steam pre-installed and Steams own repositories. Nothing too special.
post #362 of 382
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrak View Post

Or you could just throw your Windows Steam into auto start in Big Picture mode and save yourself the headache. If you have a working Windows computer with Steam installed, you get all the same features that SteamOS will include. But you also get to keep your Windows game library as well. SteamOS isn't really meant for dual booting, it's meant as either it's own standalone operating system -or- a supplemental extension of your desktop ( streaming to a local computer elsewhere, such as the living room as Steam has used for all their advertising ) free or charge ( not required to buy a $100 Windows license ).

Now, if you don't mind losing your Windows games just to install SteamOS for no real reason whatsoever, then to answer your question yes. But I would honestly leave the other drives in and set the 4th drive as the boot priority so that grub detects your Windows drives and sets up the boot loader properly allowing you to choose on start up.

But honestly, I would just save yourself the headache if you aren't used to Linux or Dual Booting then it's not for you right now. Remember SteamOS is still very much Alpha / Beta stage and things are going to continue to change until it's final release. Do expect bugs, do expect troubleshooting, do expect to have headaches if you've not used Linux before.

I would much rather suggest to install Ubuntu or Mint instead as they'll be much easier to dive into requiring little to no real troubleshooting while still providing you with Steam. Remember, SteamOS is just Debian with Steam pre-installed and Steams own repositories. Nothing too special.
the main reason im looking into this is because at the moment my SSD is getting RMA'd, so at the moment my gaming rig is a 55lb paper weight, so if that would work then im fair game to try it, because otherwise im looking at a few weeks without gaming,
but if you're saying that that will work then i'll try it, at this point trouble shooting is better than nothing
post #363 of 382
Install Linux Mint and then install Steam. It will be a much better desktop experience than SteamOS.
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post #364 of 382
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tsumi View Post

Install Linux Mint and then install Steam. It will be a much better desktop experience than SteamOS.
does mint support .exe?
post #365 of 382
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teplous View Post

does mint support .exe?

Short answer: no. Windows applications (.exe files, including Windows games) do not run natively under Linux, which is what Steam OS is built on.

Long answer: it depends. Wine is able to run many Windows applications, including many games. It's great when it works, but headache-inducing when it doesn't. From your comments I gather that you're a Linux novice, so I wouldn't recommend venturing down that road immediately.
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post #366 of 382
oh ok
how does wine work?
post #367 of 382

am I the only one who still does not see the use of linux right now at all. The main reason is there is barely any games supported on linux and most likely your entire steam library will never be supported. So you would have to have linux & windows installed if you want to play your older games. Maybe its just me but seems like a cool idea of Linux but far behind

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post #368 of 382
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teplous View Post

oh ok
how does wine work?

I don't know how to answer. It feels pretty involved when I think about it, but there's projects that try to make it as easy as possible like this here: http://www.playonlinux.com/en/

Even with a tool like that, you'll still be stranded often I bet, and will be helpless if you need to do things in configuration files and at the command line.

You'd be best advised to check out Linux Mint or Ubuntu and just do Linux stuff. You should be able to get a lot of easy to understand help through Google with Mint and Ubuntu.

So if you choose Ubuntu for example, what you need to do is educate yourself on how to install Ubuntu, then check out how to get the real NVIDIA driver running on Ubuntu so that 3D works, then install Steam. I think those are all things you can do by clicking around in Ubuntu, no need for command line stuff. Afterwards when you have Steam running, you should just check out what games you already own that can run on Linux. If you have none, you might manage to live playing Team Fortress 2 and Dota2 until you get your SSD back.

Summary of last paragraph:

(1) Download and install Ubuntu
(2) Make sure to activate the NVIDIA driver
(3) Install Steam
(4) You'll at least be able to play TF2 and Dota2 as they are free-to-play games

And research on how to disable mouse acceleration at some point.
post #369 of 382
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4LC4PON3 View Post

am I the only one who still does not see the use of linux right now at all. The main reason is there is barely any games supported on linux and most likely your entire steam library will never be supported. So you would have to have linux & windows installed if you want to play your older games. Maybe its just me but seems like a cool idea of Linux but far behind

Linux makes a good incentive for Microsoft to keep trying to stay ahead.
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post #370 of 382
Quote:
Originally Posted by deepor View Post

I don't know how to answer. It feels pretty involved when I think about it, but there's projects that try to make it as easy as possible like this here: http://www.playonlinux.com/en/

Even with a tool like that, you'll still be stranded often I bet, and will be helpless if you need to do things in configuration files and at the command line.

You'd be best advised to check out Linux Mint or Ubuntu and just do Linux stuff. You should be able to get a lot of easy to understand help through Google with Mint and Ubuntu.

So if you choose Ubuntu for example, what you need to do is educate yourself on how to install Ubuntu, then check out how to get the real NVIDIA driver running on Ubuntu so that 3D works, then install Steam. I think those are all things you can do by clicking around in Ubuntu, no need for command line stuff. Afterwards when you have Steam running, you should just check out what games you already own that can run on Linux. If you have none, you might manage to live playing Team Fortress 2 and Dota2 until you get your SSD back.

Summary of last paragraph:

(1) Download and install Ubuntu
(2) Make sure to activate the NVIDIA driver
(3) Install Steam
(4) You'll at least be able to play TF2 and Dota2 as they are free-to-play games

And research on how to disable mouse acceleration at some point.
awesome thanks for the help, i'll start dabbling
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