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[CNN] What your wireless carrier knows about you - Page 4

post #31 of 45
They think they know where I am....


MAUAHAHAHAHAHAH
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post #32 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stealth Pyros View Post

That's how I see the whole matter. Great to see someone else having what I feel is common sense/rational thinking.

The network doesn't belong to us. It's not our property. Just like you "give up" freedom of speech on any privately owned forum (they have the right to ban your access for offensive language), you "give up" other things for access to a provider's network, i.e. your location "privacy." I don't quite get how people are so offended with providers knowing their location. That's really not privacy. If any other human being can witness you at your location, there's really nothing private about it.

The network doesn't belong to us? Hmm, just because an entity puts in a contract that you give your first born child if you sneeze doesn't make it moral or legal. Point being, the internet, and networks that we use, are funded and paid for by the user. Solely. Just because some greedy entity built all the railroads doesn't make it just to artificially raise prices on oil shipments from their competitor. Point being, the consumers dollar built the ENTIRE network for our use. An entity that leverages its greed to position itself to "control" the network doesn't necessarily make it "theirs". Where do you think all those miles of wire run? Through right-of-ways.

Anyway, we are supposed to be a country founded by the people for the people and our forefathers wrote what they thought were inalienable rights to not be infringed upon. What made them inalienable was not a matter of law, but for a moral harmonious existence between all peoples. As powerful a document the Constitution was, it could not see the future anymore than they could describe their present. We, as a people, will our full bellies, warm houses, lattes and episodes of Karshardian, are complacent because we see no direct threat. We are harvested like animals for the greedy, as the Illuminati collects their golden eggs from our roost, while idly checking out the hen with the nicest badunkadunk, only concern, must stick.... repeat, must stick.....
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post #33 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by xxpenguinxx View Post

All of this for useless advertisement. Ads have not worked on me since elementary school, all they really do is make me not want to purchase that product because I'm sick of seeing it.

Yes.
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post #34 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by daweyo View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stealth Pyros View Post

That's how I see the whole matter. Great to see someone else having what I feel is common sense/rational thinking.

The network doesn't belong to us. It's not our property. Just like you "give up" freedom of speech on any privately owned forum (they have the right to ban your access for offensive language), you "give up" other things for access to a provider's network, i.e. your location "privacy." I don't quite get how people are so offended with providers knowing their location. That's really not privacy. If any other human being can witness you at your location, there's really nothing private about it.

The network doesn't belong to us? Hmm, just because an entity puts in a contract that you give your first born child if you sneeze doesn't make it moral or legal. Point being, the internet, and networks that we use, are funded and paid for by the user. Solely. Just because some greedy entity built all the railroads doesn't make it just to artificially raise prices on oil shipments from their competitor. Point being, the consumers dollar built the ENTIRE network for our use. An entity that leverages its greed to position itself to "control" the network doesn't necessarily make it "theirs". Where do you think all those miles of wire run? Through right-of-ways.

Anyway, we are supposed to be a country founded by the people for the people and our forefathers wrote what they thought were inalienable rights to not be infringed upon. What made them inalienable was not a matter of law, but for a moral harmonious existence between all peoples. As powerful a document the Constitution was, it could not see the future anymore than they could describe their present. We, as a people, will our full bellies, warm houses, lattes and episodes of Karshardian, are complacent because we see no direct threat. We are harvested like animals for the greedy, as the Illuminati collects their golden eggs from our roost, while idly checking out the hen with the nicest badunkadunk, only concern, must stick.... repeat, must stick.....

You're seriously comparing using someone else's network in exchange for giving up all your activity on that network to signing away the life of your child.

Yes. Our dollars allowed providers to build the networks they have. Our dollars also fund schools, police, parks, etc. however they each have their own laws/policies that we individually have very little control over. It's simply how life is. If it's not yours, you (individually, personally) have absolutely no word in the policies involved. Sure, if the millions of customers of these providers would ALL kill off their dealings and cancel their services, something could perhaps be done. Is society that well organized to the point that such a massive wave of retaliation is possible? Absolutely not.

The thing I find most hilarious about it all is that all of those that are so strongly opposed to the "snooping" do nothing about it and just keep giving the "violators" their money. It's like: "Hey, here's some internet access. Just know that we're going to collect and observe every bit of data that you transmit over our network," the consumer responds with "OMG WHAT?! That is like, totally a violation of my privacy! Sign me up!"
Edited by Stealth Pyros - 12/17/13 at 9:36am
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post #35 of 45
^people seem to like complaining instead of standing up for their "rights"


Nevertheless *inserts dead horse gif*

Currently taking orders for foil hats. This weeks special, buy one get the other half off.
post #36 of 45
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stealth Pyros View Post

The thing I find most hilarious about it all is that all of those that are so strongly opposed to the "snooping" do nothing about it and just keep giving the "violators" their money. It's like: "Hey, here's some internet access. Just know that we're going to collect and observe every bit of data that you transmit over our network," the consumer responds with "OMG WHAT?! That is like, totally a violation of my privacy! Sign me up!"

First post of yours I've disagreed with in a long time.

There's evidence, strong evidence that practically every single provider in the mobile business, logs their customer's data 100% of the time. That data includes GPS locations, bandwidth usage...Mobile companies typically only take data they can USE but, again, there's strong data that supports full-on packet sniffing/intercepting.

The same is true of our ISP's. All ISP's, practically have an "obligation" to data mine and that directive comes directly from the NSA/HS/FBI/CIA.

At this point it's safe to say //ALL// of them, all ISP's, on some level are ferreting your data. Be it keylogging, packet-sniffing or trace-routing, someone is recording your usage...

In the past few weeks, hopefully, I've educated most of you to the fact of why a VPN/Proxy doesn't actually work anymore -- Hopefully some of you listened...But, I doubt it because a horde of you still say "VPN VPN VPN"...No, really, no; VPN's and Proxies don't work anymore, sorry.

What I actually disagree with is the fact that, there's literally nobody else to give our money to.

Every single ISP uses existing infrastructure so, every single ISP has hard-coded regulations to follow based on FCC/Gov't restrictions...So, where's the better choice? Oh, wait, there aren't any...Unless, if you want to move to Alaska and not have internet at all, that's a valid option.

The only companies that don't ferret are ISP's like Postal's...But, there's even an extent to that...

You're operating under the assumption that the average consumer has a choice when in reality, there is none in this matter; choice is an illusion.
post #37 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Masked View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stealth Pyros View Post

The thing I find most hilarious about it all is that all of those that are so strongly opposed to the "snooping" do nothing about it and just keep giving the "violators" their money. It's like: "Hey, here's some internet access. Just know that we're going to collect and observe every bit of data that you transmit over our network," the consumer responds with "OMG WHAT?! That is like, totally a violation of my privacy! Sign me up!"

First post of yours I've disagreed with in a long time.

There's evidence, strong evidence that practically every single provider in the mobile business, logs their customer's data 100% of the time. That data includes GPS locations, bandwidth usage...Mobile companies typically only take data they can USE but, again, there's strong data that supports full-on packet sniffing/intercepting.

The same is true of our ISP's. All ISP's, practically have an "obligation" to data mine and that directive comes directly from the NSA/HS/FBI/CIA.

At this point it's safe to say //ALL// of them, all ISP's, on some level are ferreting your data. Be it keylogging, packet-sniffing or trace-routing, someone is recording your usage...

In the past few weeks, hopefully, I've educated most of you to the fact of why a VPN/Proxy doesn't actually work anymore -- Hopefully some of you listened...But, I doubt it because a horde of you still say "VPN VPN VPN"...No, really, no; VPN's and Proxies don't work anymore, sorry.

What I actually disagree with is the fact that, there's literally nobody else to give our money to.

Every single ISP uses existing infrastructure so, every single ISP has hard-coded regulations to follow based on FCC/Gov't restrictions...So, where's the better choice? Oh, wait, there aren't any...Unless, if you want to move to Alaska and not have internet at all, that's a valid option.

The only companies that don't ferret are ISP's like Postal's...But, there's even an extent to that...

You're operating under the assumption that the average consumer has a choice when in reality, there is none in this matter; choice is an illusion.

That (bolded parts) is exactly what I'm getting at though. If you're really opposed to companies having so much information about your internet activity, go away; don't use their networks. It will most certainly mean your only option would be to simply stay off the internet (and technology) altogether. It's simply the direction technology has taken. As you said, this is all being enforced by agencies like the NSA. Y b mad at the companies?

Another thing I don't understand is how people are so up in arms over their location/harmless internet search activity being known and logged by their providers, yet they already so easily hand over their credit card/social security/other sensitive information to these companies in the first place, to obtain service from them. I have yet to come across a phone/internet provider that doesn't require your social security number for a soft credit check. I believe even Metro PCS does/did it (perhaps until just recently with the T-Mobile buyout). Really? So... you're ok with giving out your SSN to Comcast (or whoever) but oh my God. They know your location/what you search for/the fact that you illegally download torrents of music and movies? That's where you all draw the line? I personally feel that the cashier at my local grocery store knows more about me than any internet giant knows. She/he/they know what kind of items I buy, what days and times I usually shop there, how I usually pay, and who I go there with. Not to mention they physically SEE me present at the store, so they also know what I look like, what I wear, how I talk, etc. Sorry guys, I just find that one simple visit to the grocery store is much more "revealing" than my internet/phone provider checking out my packets.
Edited by Stealth Pyros - 12/17/13 at 11:02am
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post #38 of 45
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stealth Pyros View Post

That (bolded parts) is exactly what I'm getting at though. If you're really opposed to companies having so much information about your internet activity, go away; don't use their networks. It will most certainly mean your only option would be to simply stay off the internet (and technology) altogether. It's simply the direction technology has taken. As you said, this is all being enforced by agencies like the NSA. Y b mad at the companies?

Another thing I don't understand is how people are so up in arms over their location/harmless internet search activity being known and logged by their providers, yet they already so easily hand over their credit card/social security/other sensitive information to these companies in the first place, to obtain service from them. I have yet to come across a phone/internet provider that doesn't require your social security number for a soft credit check. I believe even Metro PCS does/did it (perhaps until just recently with the T-Mobile buyout). Really? So... you're ok with giving out your SSN to Comcast (or whoever) but oh my God. They know your location/what you search for/the fact that you illegally download torrents of music and movies? That's where you all draw the line? I personally feel that the cashier at my local grocery store knows more about me than any internet giant knows. She/he/they know what kind of items I buy, what days and times I usually shop there, how I usually pay, and who I go there with. Not to mention they physically SEE me present at the store, so they also know what I look like, what I wear, how I talk, etc. Sorry guys, I just find that one simple visit to the grocery store is much more "revealing" than my internet/phone provider checking out my packets.

Ahh. I thought you were being serious...Lol. My sarcasm/facetiousness detector is clearly broken today.

What irks me the most about this entire "situation" is actually OCN. -- Every single time this topic is brought up, a horde of users immediately say "Well, we can just VPN or Proxy and then our data is 100% private". ~ Ermmmm, no. Maybe 5/6 years ago but, not now.

I much prefer your approach. Accept the fact that it's already happening, will continue TO happen and just get used to it now because it's not going away.

I remember last year when the MPAA was purposefully torrenting Blu-Ray releases just so they could track the abusers and the back-ends...In fact, I'm almost positive they're exclusively releasing the HQ versions these days.

The wolves are now disguised as the Shepards...
post #39 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dimaggio1103 View Post

Crap so they can see all the freaky pron I look at? wink.gif

Who hasn't ? So don't worry thumb.gif
post #40 of 45
People will just adapt to encrypt more heavily and companies who want to save face will now offer forward encryption and be under the watchful eye of security experts. Its a huge industry now and your unlikely to find someone somewhere who doesn't scan every device that enters into their home for backdoors or network traffic. It's going to get harder to monitor peoples stuff.

I noticed someone mentioned about the future and how it will evolve to become worse if people dont stand upto this.. The new buzz word from these big American corporations that we all know and trust is 'The internet of everything'

Cisco are one such company working hard to bring connected water mains, power, fridges, toasters even.. at what point do they control your whole life? probably at the point where you cant buy a device without a connection ! And you can call people as tin foil hat as you like but that is what these big corporations are pushing for ... mega sized integration of people into commodities themselves under complete surveillance and control..

And yes this just like a fascist dystopia waiting to happen, these surveillance steps were the first and unfortunately for them they were caught with their pants down in the park
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