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Case fans - PWM vs v NON PWM fans - Page 10

post #91 of 100
Guys, sorry to revive old thread; but after reading all 9 10 pages I still couldn't come into conclusion, so;

Is it safe for a normal case fan (non-PWM) to be voltage-controlled by motherboard? (For example using Asus AI Suite's Fan Xpert).

FYI the fan is Thermaltake Riing 12 LED, non PWM. In the packaging, it's stated 1500 RPM max, and 1000 RPM with low-noise cable. But Asus Fan Xpert seems able to run it even lower, such as at 700 RPM - without the low-noise cable.

Will it shorten the motor life or.. ?

If possible I don't want to use the extra low-noise cable.. I already have too many cables in my case.

Thanks.
Edited by ignsvn - 1/22/16 at 3:11am
post #92 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by ignsvn View Post

Guys, sorry to revive old thread; but after reading all 9 10 pages I still couldn't come into conclusion, so;

Is it safe for a normal case fan (non-PWM) to be voltage-controlled by motherboard? (For example using Asus AI Suite's Fan Xpert).

FYI the fan is Thermaltake Riing 12 LED, non PWM. In the packaging, it's stated 1500 RPM max, and 1000 RPM with low-noise cable. But Asus Fan Xpert seems able to run it even lower, such as at 700 RPM - without the low-noise cable.

Will it shorten the motor life or.. ?

If possible I don't want to use the extra low-noise cable.. I already have too many cables in my case.

Thanks.
In the famous words of someone. "Just do it!" thumb.gif
That is why motherboards and fans are what the are. tongue.gif

It is common for manufacturer's specs to give higher idle speeds than fans will actually run at.
post #93 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by doyll View Post

In the famous words of someone. "Just do it!" thumb.gif
That is why motherboards and fans are what the are. tongue.gif

It is common for manufacturer's specs to give higher idle speeds than fans will actually run at.

Unfortunately the clause "just do it" is not covered by warranties, soo.. biggrin.gif
post #94 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by ignsvn View Post

Unfortunately the clause "just do it" is not covered by warranties, soo.. biggrin.gif
Running case fans at lower voltage does not hurt them. I've been doing it for more years than you have probably been alive.

But do whatever you want.
post #95 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by doyll View Post

Running case fans at lower voltage does not hurt them. I've been doing it for more years than you have probably been alive.

But do whatever you want.

That settles it. Thanks! thumb.gif
post #96 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by doyll View Post

Running case fans at lower voltage does not hurt them. I've been doing it for more years than you have probably been alive.

But do whatever you want.

well... as long as it's high enough that the fans are actually spinning. if the voltage is so low that the fans are just jerking and snapping back but not actually spinning, then over time the heat from the fan trying to spin will decrease the operating life of the fan.
post #97 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by psyclum View Post

well... as long as it's high enough that the fans are actually spinning. if the voltage is so low that the fans are just jerking and snapping back but not actually spinning, then over time the heat from the fan trying to spin will decrease the operating life of the fan.
Operative word is 'running'. tongue.gif
As long as the fans are 'running' the motors are spinning and blades are moving. biggrin.gif
So obviously 'running' fans at less than 12v is not a problem. thumb.gif
And obviously 'stalling' them by not giving them enough voltage to keep them 'running' is a problem. thumbsdownsmileyanim.gif
post #98 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by doyll View Post

Operative word is 'running'. tongue.gif
As long as the fans are 'running' the motors are spinning and blades are moving. biggrin.gif
So obviously 'running' fans at less than 12v is not a problem. thumb.gif
And obviously 'stalling' them by not giving them enough voltage to keep them 'running' is a problem. thumbsdownsmileyanim.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by psyclum View Post

well... as long as it's high enough that the fans are actually spinning. if the voltage is so low that the fans are just jerking and snapping back but not actually spinning, then over time the heat from the fan trying to spin will decrease the operating life of the fan.

Don't worry, I already thought about that. No point making my case fan running intermittently anyway. It's now running at 11xx RPM and still pretty silent. I could barely hear noise.FYI my case (Silverstone SG08) is on the desk, about 70cm from me.

Thanks for the responses, appreciated.
post #99 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by ignsvn View Post


Don't worry, I already thought about that. No point making my case fan running intermittently anyway. It's now running at 11xx RPM and still pretty silent. I could barely hear noise.FYI my case (Silverstone SG08) is on the desk, about 70cm from me.

Thanks for the responses, appreciated.

SG08 uses the AP181 which is the exact same fan i have in my FT02. the AP181 can reliably spin down to 400RPM (brand new i've even had them spin down to 350RPM) however, I keep mine at 500RPM to be on the safe side taking into consideration of wear and tear over the years. At 500 RPM, i would consider the fan to be inaudible unless you are actually listening for the noise of the fan. it's easily ignored and it's high enough voltage that i don't ever have to worry about it not spinning up from a cold boot.

you should have your mobo control the AP181 (the wattage requirements of the AP181 is well within any 3pin mobo header) and have the fan spin down to about 500RPM till your CPU is around 50C then ramp up the fan in a fairly aggressive curve to 100% (around 1150RPM) at 70C. that's just a general guideline i use, but your needs may vary depending on whether you are playing a CPU intensive game or GPU intensive game. make your adjustments according to how hard your GPU is working.

during idle you should be able to spin down to 450RPM on a reliable basis considering your fan is newer then mine, but like i said, adjust to whatever you feel comfortable with.
Edited by psyclum - 1/26/16 at 11:21am
post #100 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by psyclum View Post

SG08 uses the AP181 which is the exact same fan i have in my FT02. the AP181 can reliably spin down to 400RPM (brand new i've even had them spin down to 350RPM) however, I keep mine at 500RPM to be on the safe side taking into consideration of wear and tear over the years. At 500 RPM, i would consider the fan to be inaudible unless you are actually listening for the noise of the fan. it's easily ignored and it's high enough voltage that i don't ever have to worry about it not spinning up from a cold boot.

you should have your mobo control the AP181 (the wattage requirements of the AP181 is well within any 3pin mobo header) and have the fan spin down to about 500RPM till your CPU is around 50C then ramp up the fan in a fairly aggressive curve to 100% (around 1150RPM) at 70C. that's just a general guideline i use, but your needs may vary depending on whether you are playing a CPU intensive game or GPU intensive game. make your adjustments according to how hard your GPU is working.

during idle you should be able to spin down to 450RPM on a reliable basis considering your fan is newer then mine, but like i said, adjust to whatever you feel comfortable with.

If you read my earlier posts, you'll notice that the fan in question is Thermaltake Riing 12 LED smile.gif

I have replaced my AP181 with the Riing because AP181 is too large & thick - it obstructed my GPU power connector (Zotac 950 ITX - Anybody else using it? We should start owners club biggrin.gif).

AP181 is indeed one solid performer. I usually set it to spin at 4XX RPM. Quiet, great airflow.
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