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Need help from a Mod or Anybody

post #1 of 35
Thread Starter 
I would like to have a link to the official thread about all there is to know about Linux.
(Like what is Linux, What Linux can do, How to acquire Linux, and the uses for Linux.)
Thanks in Advance
Edited by Staticisbad - 1/6/14 at 10:19am
post #2 of 35
Linky
post #3 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssgtnubb View Post

Linky
Thanks this is what I was looking for.
post #4 of 35
The essentials thread ( linked at the top of the Linux, Unix section ) is a good starting point. But doesn't have much in the ways of what's being asked here. And there's little in the way of a single link to have any meaningful description of all of questions asked. Best is to search around, there are plenty of Wiki's around with tons of great information in them.

  • What is Linux?
    Linux is an open source operating system that was modeled after UNIX and intended to be a free

  • What can Linux do?
    I think a better question is what can't it do, as it can do just about anything you want.
  • How to acquire Linux
    Usually you simply go to the particular distributions website that you're interested in. If you don't know what distribution you may want, you can take a look at www.distrowatch.com and have a look at the different ones available. The easiest ones to start with if you're new is Ubuntu or Mint ( based on Ubuntu ), they have some of the simplest installers and make the command line pretty much non-existent if need be.
  • Uses for Linux
    Aside from gaming, which is still in its infancy on Linux, there isn't much it isn't good at. Servers, Routers, Switches, ATM machines, POS machines and really just about every electronic device you use in your day to day life will usually use some form of *nix most likely. It can be tailored to fit just about any application no matter how large or small.
post #5 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrak View Post

The essentials thread ( linked at the top of the Linux, Unix section ) is a good starting point. But doesn't have much in the ways of what's being asked here. And there's little in the way of a single link to have any meaningful description of all of questions asked. Best is to search around, there are plenty of Wiki's around with tons of great information in them.

  • What is Linux?
    Linux is an open source operating system that was modeled after UNIX and intended to be a free

  • What can Linux do?
    I think a better question is what can't it do, as it can do just about anything you want.
  • How to acquire Linux
    Usually you simply go to the particular distributions website that you're interested in. If you don't know what distribution you may want, you can take a look at www.distrowatch.com and have a look at the different ones available. The easiest ones to start with if you're new is Ubuntu or Mint ( based on Ubuntu ), they have some of the simplest installers and make the command line pretty much non-existent if need be.
  • Uses for Linux
    Aside from gaming, which is still in its infancy on Linux, there isn't much it isn't good at. Servers, Routers, Switches, ATM machines, POS machines and really just about every electronic device you use in your day to day life will usually use some form of *nix most likely. It can be tailored to fit just about any application no matter how large or small.

I think there should be something in there about the difference between Linux, GNU, and Linux distrobutions. Linux is the OS kernel, and a Linux (or GNU/Linux) distrobution is the kernel with the GNU user land and/or other utilities installed. That may be well outside the scope of this list, but I do believe it is a good distinction for new users to learn sooner rather than later.

I noticed the banner on OCN's home page is lacking the image URL with the penguins now. frown.gif
post #6 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ferrari8608 View Post

I think there should be something in there about the difference between Linux, GNU, and Linux distrobutions. Linux is the OS kernel, and a Linux (or GNU/Linux) distrobution is the kernel with the GNU user land and/or other utilities installed. That may be well outside the scope of this list, but I do believe it is a good distinction for new users to learn sooner rather than later.

I noticed the banner on OCN's home page is lacking the image URL with the penguins now. frown.gif

Meh, I never put too much importance on the whole GNU / Linux separation myself. I think at this point the only ones stick with saying "GNU/Linux" are the super hardcore elitists and extreme nitpickers, everyone else just says Linux which is easier. At this point I say they're one in the same as there's not going to be any separating the two, so we might as well just use one name.

Though, anyone looking up Linux would come across this; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux which links to the GNU/Linux naming controversy


But yes, if someone wants the specifics they're worth mentioning, though anyone looking up Linux will find out about GNU, whereas the same can't be said in reverse.
post #7 of 35
I agree with Shrak.

It's a bit like "Windows", as a trademark, refers to a number of different MS OS's. It's not until you start becoming a Windows engineer that you really care about the differences. So why should the average "Linux" user care about GNU/Hurd or GNU/kFreeBSD?
post #8 of 35
Greetz
I think the point he was trying to make was not the old Stallman argument, wherin Stallman may have been the Prime Mover but he all but demanded that people refer to Linux as Gnu-Linux in a bid to stay in the spotlight of Linus Torvalds, creator of the Linux kernel. The point was the age-old quest to stop confusion over the vast number of distributions, the point being they all use the Linux kernel. Nobody cares about GNU anymore other than historians, but more each day care about Linux, the kernel.

I agree that this is still an important distinction as it points up the value, flexibility and power of Linux, in fact Open Source itself, as it compares with proprietary systems that have little or none of that flexibility, scalability, or user access to the real horsepower. So it is part of the answer to the question that everyone who considers Linux must ask themselves - "Why should I bother to spend months just learning the basics, and years getting the fine points about how to administer an operating system, when all I really do is play some games, check my facebook and email, maybe mess with some photos, movies and music?"

The answer is pretty simple, especially now with all the ruckus over Windows 8 interface. Either you're willing to keep shelling out $100++ bucks every couple of years and accept what they give you, basically no questions asked (or at least paid any attention to), and also accept losing most of the value in the time and money you spent on the earlier, and now unsupported offering, or not. If that's fine with you, stick with Windows, or to some extent, Mac.

OTOH if you want most of what you learn now to still work 10 years from now, and to never be forced to accept some corporation's idea of what you should have or be allowed to access or how, then really, the Linux kernel is the only game in town. You could build your own complete system, or you could find someone else's work that fits your niche and just use theirs and tweak it to fit you even better, and that is the role of the Distribution, or Distro.
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post #9 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet2 View Post

Greetz
I think the point he was trying to make was not the old Stallman argument, wherin Stallman may have been the Prime Mover but he all but demanded that people refer to Linux as Gnu-Linux in a bid to stay in the spotlight of Linus Torvalds, creator of the Linux kernel. The point was the age-old quest to stop confusion over the vast number of distributions, the point being they all use the Linux kernel. Nobody cares about GNU anymore other than historians, but more each day care about Linux, the kernel.

I agree that this is still an important distinction as it points up the value, flexibility and power of Linux, in fact Open Source itself, as it compares with proprietary systems that have little or none of that flexibility, scalability, or user access to the real horsepower. So it is part of the answer to the question that everyone who considers Linux must ask themselves - "Why should I bother to spend months just learning the basics, and years getting the fine points about how to administer an operating system, when all I really do is play some games, check my facebook and email, maybe mess with some photos, movies and music?"

The answer is pretty simple, especially now with all the ruckus over Windows 8 interface. Either you're willing to keep shelling out $100++ bucks every couple of years and accept what they give you, basically no questions asked (or at least paid any attention to), and also accept losing most of the value in the time and money you spent on the earlier, and now unsupported offering, or not. If that's fine with you, stick with Windows, or to some extent, Mac.

OTOH if you want most of what you learn now to still work 10 years from now, and to never be forced to accept some corporation's idea of what you should have or be allowed to access or how, then really, the Linux kernel is the only game in town. You could build your own complete system, or you could find someone else's work that fits your niche and just use theirs and tweak it to fit you even better, and that is the role of the Distribution, or Distro.
Nobody learns "the Linux kernel" apart from kernel developers and a few of the more devoted enthusiasts. What you're talking about is POSIX (and related standards) and that's a whole other debate from any of the points raised above.
Edited by Plan9 - 1/7/14 at 9:09am
post #10 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan9 View Post

Nobody learns "the Linux kernel" apart from kernel developers and a few of the more devoted enthusiasts. What you're talking about is POSIX (and related standards) and that's a whole other debate from any of the points raised above.

Not only are you missing the point that, at it's most fundamental base, Linux==the kernel, and the stuff on top is what constitutes distributions, but you are completely wrong that I was referring to POSIX. For one thing Windows is a posix system, still to a large extent and there are projects to try to make it 100%. What I was referring to is the most basic difference is Open Source, all the way down to kernel level. Not only is most of Linux free as in "no charge" but also free as in "freedom" to make it be and do as you wish.

Technically speaking, the reason Stallman was right that it should be called Gnu-Linux was that while the original kernel could boot up, alone it was much like the Altair that could only flash a few lights, there is little to do once you are booted. To be a full operating system, there must be means to affect the way hardware is employed, to actually run a program. The hierarchy is most commonly the Kernel, Privileged Application Layer (having direct access to hardware), together comprising the base OpSys, and the Application Layer, subject to control by the Operating System below. The GNU project provided contributions to the last two but was lacking a working kernel. At the very least this means a text editor and a command environment. Examples of these introduced into the kernel are aout, elf binaries and of course sh and bash shells. Once combined, Linux as a complete operating system was born. It can be argued that Linus's contribution was the critical one, as time proved the microkernel approach would have delayed Linux more than 14 years, but the fact remains Linus found a ready solution that provided what he lacked, with GNU, and could employ it because it was not proprietary.

I'm quite sure this is not news to you, Plan9, as I feel pretty confident you have launched "make menuconfig&&make bzImage&&make modules&&make modules_install" more than once or twice tongue.gif So surely you are aware of the distinctions between the kernel, an operating system, and a distribution. You are also familiar with the difference between Proprietary and Open Source, and maybe even read "The Cathedral and the Bazaar" so I'm guessing being contrary is just in your nature. smile.gif
G'Day Mate
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