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post #21 of 35
1. Again, there's really no definite answer to that. Me personally, I like Arch first and foremost, but I also like Debian. They're both a little more hands on than the likes of Ubuntu, Mint, Fedora, etc. without being too hands on like Gentoo and Slack, which to me personally, are more work than they're worth. So it's all really opinion on your needs, skill level, laziness ( or lack-thereof ), or whether you want something that drives itself or requires you to give it some attention from time to time.

2. There's many ways to. You can start from scratch with just a kernel and build your way up from there. Or you can fork an existing distribution, which seems to be the most popular and quite frankly, easiest.
post #22 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan9 View Post

1. There isn't a "the best", but there is "preferable". Going back to my vehicles analogy, some people prefer sports cars, some prefer hybrid cars, others want big saloon cars. What I personally run is Arch, but that has a rather steep learning curve for new users compared to Mint and Ubuntu, which is aimed to be beginner friendly.

2. That depends on why the distro was created. Sometimes distros are born from an "original" idea, so the creators will either take a fairly minimal base (eg Debian) and build their own concepts around that (this is how Ubuntu came to be) or build something entire from scratch (eg using LFS as a guide). Other times someone just wants to tweak an existing distro, so they'll take a popular desktop and redistribute it with different defaults (this is why you find so many Ubuntu forks out there).

4. Programming languages are generally OS agnostic. It's a little difficult to briefly explain the relationship of a kernel, user land, and so on. So I'd recommend you do some reading up on kernels (even if it's just from Wikipedia) if you're really interested in this side of things. But in laymans terms, the kernel is the lowest level part of the OS, the part that talks directly to your hardware, and everything else is the software that runs on top. Typically, kernels can't easily be separated from the rest of the OS (the "user land"), and to a degree the same is true with GNU/Linux, which is why the other GNU OS's with a different kernel are largely experimental.

Thanks. Do you know any good links to explain kernels?
post #23 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrak View Post

1. Again, there's really no definite answer to that. Me personally, I like Arch first and foremost, but I also like Debian. They're both a little more hands on than the likes of Ubuntu, Mint, Fedora, etc. without being too hands on like Gentoo and Slack, which to me personally, are more work than they're worth. So it's all really opinion on your needs, skill level, laziness ( or lack-thereof ), or whether you want something that drives itself or requires you to give it some attention from time to time.

2. There's many ways to. You can start from scratch with just a kernel and build your way up from there. Or you can fork an existing distribution, which seems to be the most popular and quite frankly, easiest.

How does one build a Kernel?
post #24 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Staticisbad View Post

Thanks. Do you know any good links to explain kernels?
Not to hand. Just have a read of Wikipedia's entry for 'kernels' and then run targeted Google searches for any questions raised.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Staticisbad View Post

How does one build a Kernel?
From scratch, or how would one compile the Linux kernel?
post #25 of 35
Thread Starter 
From Scrath.
post #26 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Staticisbad View Post

From Scrath.
Not easily. laugher.gif

There's so much variety in the range of hardware for desktop PCs that would need to be supported, and bugs that the hardware combinations can introduce, that the only reason to write a kernel from scratch would be as a personal hobby.
post #27 of 35
Thread Starter 
Thanks.
post #28 of 35
post #29 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Staticisbad View Post

How does one build a Kernel?

Greetings and welcome to the Linux Community here on OCN and in general. If you had a computer that does only one thing with one set of hardware, say an ARM device with one kind of video card and monitor and I/O ports that just plays movies, it would require only an extremely simple and limited Operating System (basically just a handful of applications) and an extremely small and limited kernel as there is only just the existing hardware to support. It is the job of the kernel to act as a conductor on the symphony of application requests to keep it all harmonious. Basically it handles how hardware "talks to each other" and schedules resources, preempting so that not 2 (or more) applications try to occupy the same space at the same time.

There is only a need to create an entirely new kernel if you have hardware that lacks support in any existing and open kernel. The Linux kernel is code basically just one or a couple steps "off the metal" for the most part, but that offers a user friendly, or at least very simple, text-based interface for customization. One does not have to be a coder to build a custom Linux kernel. Essentially there are hundreds of options for what to support in a form like a multiple choice test, having a maximum of three answers -

1) No Support
2) Compile as an on-demand Loadable Module/Driver, or
3) Hard Wired into the kernel fulltime.

With so many options (largely for so many different kinds/brands of hardware), it can take some time setting all the options the first time or two, but for a given platform, say x86 or x86-64 (also called AMD64) some stuff is just common and can easily be automatically carried from one kernel build to another.. Some of that is already happening under the level that is available in simple text form. Basically there is little or no need to reinvent the wheel. Like much of coding today, there are lots of "widgets" available.

Installing and custom building a kernel is not hard. Depending on how much you know about your existing hardware and how fast your machine is, it can be accomplished in well under an hour, even as little as a few minutes. Almost every distro has the ability to build a custom kernel. Some discourage it, but it is still possible, and some actively encourage it. It's quite unlikely that you can paint yourself into a corner you can't get out of. Once people begin to realize that it is almost impossible to damage hardware from the keyboard (only data is at risk) the lights go on and set you free. Just jump in and get your feet wet. You will very likely be glad you did.
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(16 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i5 - 3550 Asrock Z77 Extreme4 Gigabyte GTX 760  4x2GB Corsair Vengeance 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Seagate SATA 2TB x 2  Plextor PX-891SAW CM-Hyper N520 Slackware 14, Studio KUbuntu, OpenSuSe 12.3, Wi... 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
32" Vizio HDTV + DLP Logitech Wireless Corsair HX-850 Antec Sonata I 
MouseMouse PadAudioOther
Razer DeathAdder 2013 dual ESI Juli@ CoolGear ExtSata Enclosure w/ Optical and 3TB S... 
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post #30 of 35
Thread Starter 
Thanks do you have any guides for such activities?
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