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Overclocking CPU vs. GPU/Building a new computer

Poll Results: MSI vs ASUS (I've herad a lot of good things about both, so just curious what everyone thinks)

 
  • 66% (2)
    MSI
  • 33% (1)
    ASUS
3 Total Votes  
post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
As of right now the best computer I have is my Dell laptop that I got as a gift a year and a half ago. Specs here:

Intel Core i7-3610QM quad core (hyperthreaded to 8) at 2.3 GHZ
Nvidia GT 650M 2GB Vram
8GB Ram at I think ~1333 hertz or something
64 bit Winderp$ 7 (I'm a Linux user as you probably just guessed, I dual boot Ubuntu)

It runs BF4 at 1080 x 1200 res, low settings, and can get a solid 60 on most maps (I don't have Vsync on, but I have set a max FPS, that way I don't have to have the negative effects of Vsync and I can still cap my FPS). On some maps it'll drop quite a bit, even going to 30 FPS at times. I have managed to record BF4 using OBS (Open Broadcasting Software) (I'm going to try Nvidia Shadowplay soon) and still get mainly 60 FPS on the good maps, but it really hurts me on maps like Siege of Shanghai. I'm already thinking about building a new PC, but regardless of whether I do that or not, I am going to overclock something on this PC to try to get better performance as it'll still be in use even with a new PC. I THINK I should overclock my processor, but I'm not sure. 8 cores of 2.3 GHz seems like it shouldn't be the problem, but BF4 seems to use the CPU more than the GPU from my experience and from what I've heard. I've looked all around the internet, but I figured it would probably be better to just make sure and ask the question again for my specific computer.

Also, don't even give me the it's a laptop, not meant for gaming, or, it'll overheat if you do this, it runs games just fine, but I do understand I need a desktop in the future. As for the heat, I have a second laptop fan under my existing one (it's a special laptop cooling device), and that thing also allows more room for air to come in. Plus, my warranty is gone so overclocking won't hurt a thing. That being said, whatever I overclock this to, I want it to be at safe clock speeds.

I'm interested in building a new computer as mentioned in the title, however, if you answer to my thread please answer both parts of the question if you can, as I plan on overclocking AND building a new computer. As for my new PC, I want to stick with an Nvidia GPU as they have better Linux drivers, and probably an Intel CPU, but another CPU brand is fine by me. I've heard a lot of good things about MSI (Specifically them coming overclocked by default and still getting a warranty on them / being easy to overclock and coming with special software / being cheaper than the chip's maker is) so I'll probably go with them. Any suggestions on different companies, different models, etc are greatly appreciated. I want something that's a really good value, will run BF4 at Ultra settings, 1080p and still be able to record the gameplay while still maintaining 60 FPS. Price range is give or take ~800-1000 bucks. I'm considering building something around these specs:

MSI GTX (give or take a model or two for better value)770 ~3GB Vram
(Not sure if MSI makes cpus, but if they do (or a company like MSI, I'll take theirs instead) ~Intel 2550k i5 ~3GHz default clock speed(give or take a model or 2) (I chose the 255k because I heard that you'll never need higher as there is no difference from a 2500 series and a 4000 series or something like that, correct me if I'm wrong though, it all boils down to performance, not price in the end)
At least 8GB ram, no more than 16 as that's overkill already, 1600 clock speed
Terabyte HDD or smaller SSD
An MSI motherboard so it has a good BIOS in it that allows for easy changes to hardware

So as you can see, all of that is already pushing the budget. I don't have to worry about a case, as I already have one (not sure about if it has a power box in it already or what the wattage is, etc.), so that takes a little of the price off. As said above, I can go down or up a model if needed, and I'm not too sure which CPU to get. If AMD is better for the money on both Linux and Winderp$, I'll get an AMD cpu. I also do NOT want onboard graphics or integrated graphics on my CPU unless it's cheaper to get it with than without. I do want to make sure I won't be needing to upgrade for several more years after this. I wish I had known as much as I know now a year and a half ago lol, I'd have just built a new computer then.

Thanks for any help I receive, I know I'm asking for a lot lol.
Edited by Bugattikid2012 - 1/8/14 at 10:40am
post #2 of 6
Most laptop BIOS won't permit overclocking the CPU at all. The 3610QM has a locked multiplier, and I will bet you can't change the BCLK on that laptop. You're probably stuck with stock speeds on that Dell.

BF4 on Ultra settings at 1920x1080p with a solid 60+ FPS is going to require a GTX 770 at a minimum, and I'd strongly recommend a GTX 780 Ti if you can afford it.

Don't skimp on the CPU - Should be looking at a Socket 1150 motherboard with a Haswell 4670K if you don't want hyper threading, 4770K if you do. You mentioned a 2550K - I don't think there is such a beast. There were 2500K and 2600K processors, two generations ago, that you can find on the used market. They haven't sold a "new" 2500K in at least 1-1.5 years. Sandy Bridge 2500K/2600K/2700K also doesn't support PCIe 3.0, though the motherboard might depending on which one you get. If you want PCIe 3.0 compatibility, you need at least a Ivy Bridge (3570K/3770K/etc. series) CPU.

Greg
post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the fast reply!

You're right, my Dell BIOS barely lets me do anything, but if necessarily I could always change it, but that's always risky. From what I've found you're completely right about the 770 being minimal, but if it's necessary I can turn down a few of the settings that don't have a big effect. I'm not sure if price will be a problem, as from what my dad has talked about he sounded like he may buy it, but that's a long shot and probably won't happen. You're probably right about the CPU, I don't have any idea on why that one is still showing up on various search results. Plus there's more to a CPU than just the GHz, and those older models probably don't have what I need. I don't think I want hyperthreading as I see no advantage to it, and I hear about some problems with it on certain games (sadly my Dell BIOS won't let me disable it, typical Dell...). I may have the numbers wrong on that cpu, it may have been a 3500 series or something.

MSI GTX (give or take a model or two for better value)770 ~3GB Vram
(Not sure if MSI makes cpus, but if they do (or a company like MSI, I'll take theirs instead) Intel ~3500k i5 ~3GHz default clock speed(give or take a model or 2)
At least 8GB ram, no more than 16 as that's overkill already, 1600 clock speed
Terabyte HDD or smaller SSD
An MSI motherboard so it has a good BIOS in it that allows for easy changes to hardware


Would you say that build would be under 1000 or so, and how much more would the 780TI cost?
post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 
One thing that I've heard a great deal about is the Nvidia 680ti. It's the best card on the market for the value. So in other words it has the most performance per dollar. Couldn't I buy like 2 or three of those for the same price of the 780ti and have better performance? I have heard some talk about how games won't use the full potential of multiple cards, is this true? I can see how it might not split the workload on the two cards, but if they are both wired to the motherboard, and the HDMI is out of the motherboard, it SHOULD work better, right? There's not much on this on the web that I can find.
post #5 of 6
I've never heard of a GTX 680Ti. There is a 650 Ti, a 650 Ti Boost, and 660 Ti though. Two GTX 670's would be faster than a single GTX 780 in most titles. You're right though, there are some games that don't play well with SLI and you don't get the same amount of performance boost out of that second card.

With two GPU in SLI, the HDMI port on the motherboard isn't used at all -- you connect your monitor(s) to the GPU monitor ports. The HDMI on the motherboard is exclusively for the integrated Intel/AMD iGPU on the CPU.

Greg
post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 
What if your monitor only has one HDMI port? Would you be forced to use DVI? Also, what build would you recommend to not be too pricey, but run BF4 at still amazing settings?
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