post #11 of 11
Greetings and welcome back to the Linux Community smile.gif

OK let's address each in turn.....


1.Stable for 24/7 use, stays stable for a long time considering updates and stuff

You can scratch this off your list since all Linux by virtue of compartmentalising applications through daemons is way more stable than Windows. That's why Linux almost never requires a reboot, whereas rebooting is what people do at the first sign of trouble in Windows.


2.Fairly large community

Unless you pick something totally obscure, you can scratch this too. Some really large communities offer little help wheras some smaller ones have a higher percentage of (and often higher quality) help. You can see a pretty good cross-section of which distros have good support just by perusing this list -

Distro List


3.I'm not a big gamer but i want steam just in case

While Steam has it's own Distro now, it will run on any distro, so scratch this too.



4.Should be able to run 3x1080p monitors and I'll be probably getting 4K later.

This depends on your video card's driver and is also not distro dependent, although I should add that many distros make proprietary (and the best) graphics drivers a total pita to install correctly. You have more options to install properly, that is to say outside of XWindows, in Arch, OpenSuse, Debian, and Slackware. I don't know about Fedora as I haven't tried it in years.



5.Good multimedia support

Again, support for any fundamental feature such as multimedia comes from the Linux Kernel not the distro, so scratch this.



6.FlexRaid or SnapRaid + some drive pooling

AFAIK any distro running higher than a 2.6 kernel will support this just fine. Most have v3 kernels available now. Scratch this.



7.This is not very important but I'd prefer distro without Unity

In every important distro, if not all, you have the option to use a Display Manager such as GDM or KDM. These double as a login screen at which you can choose from any of dozens of Window Managers and Desktop Environments, so scratch this too.

Hmmm what have we here? All of the concerns are satisfied in any distro. So it seems you have asked the wrong questions which is common when people are relatively new to Linux. As seen in #4, your most important concern should be flexibility ie. - can you easily drop out of X, if you choose to install video drivers direct from the manufacturer instead of being forced to use the distro-specific dkms variety.

With all this in mind, I'm going to recommend OpenSuSe as it is as user friendly at base as Ubuntu and has a lot more customization options. Arch, Debian and Slackware are also deeply configurable but have a steeper learning curve, so they depend on how hard you're willing to work for ultimate control. On the surface OpenSuSe is fine for beginners but even "out of the box" they don't lock you in to "their way". However as you can see, you have many options.
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NewMain
(16 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i5 - 3550 Asrock Z77 Extreme4 Gigabyte GTX 760  4x2GB Corsair Vengeance 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Seagate SATA 2TB x 2  Plextor PX-891SAW CM-Hyper N520 Slackware 14, Studio KUbuntu, OpenSuSe 12.3, Wi... 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
32" Vizio HDTV + DLP Logitech Wireless Corsair HX-850 Antec Sonata I 
MouseMouse PadAudioOther
Razer DeathAdder 2013 dual ESI Juli@ CoolGear ExtSata Enclosure w/ Optical and 3TB S... 
  hide details  
Reply