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Build Log -First ever build - Page 3

post #21 of 103
thats gunna be a nice build,post up sum 3dmark scores will ya
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big fan
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post #22 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by broddam View Post
Oh ok cool. I am not going to overclock until I have this thing up and running smoothly. I think I read somewhere that windows will have all the generic drivers I need initially, right? Then I can download the updated ones after I get system up and going?
Windows will have drivers for everything you need to get barely going (unless you'd want to try SATA RAID, which I don't recommend for a first homebuilt PC - in that case you'd need to perform extra steps before you could even get Windows installed). Booting a properly assembled system with the Windows CD in it should start the Windows install process. This will get you into Windows. From there, you'll be able to access your CD / DVD.

The very first thing you should do after your system powers up into Windows is to put in the CD that comes with the motherboard. It will have all the drivers you need to get the chipset recognized properly by Windows, as well as the crucial drivers for the onboard Network Interface Card (NIC). When you have the chipset drivers and the NIC functional, jump out to nVidia and grab the latest drivers. Or ask someone here what drivers they recommend... believe it or not, the most recent drivers aren't always the best/most stable. When in doubt, just go ahead and use the drivers that come with the card. Some will tell you that is just horrible, but in reality it isn't. In the best case drivers might increase performance by single digit per cent range. In the worst case, drivers are unstable and may crash the video subsystem (or all of Windows) when running games. That latter reason is, IMHO, the only truly compelling reason to change revs on drivers. Especially for a first-time builder.

You could also go to Creative to get the latest drivers for that sound card. You may wish to post a question on the sound card board to see what others feel about installing Creative drivers from the CD that comes with the board. In my experience, it is a BIG mistake... Creative bundles so much crap (and I do mean excrement) with the 'typical' install that it is usually a better idea to do a stripped down install where the only thing you get are the actual drivers themselves, and none of the junk that gets included with the typical install.

In summary, Windows install will get you everything you need except:
  1. Chipset drivers
  2. NIC drivers
  3. Video card drivers
  4. Sound card drivers

This isn't the rule, btw. Depending on the age of your hardware, sometimes Windows has all the basic drivers for everything you own. But with new stuff like in your build, it won't have some stuff.
Bump my rep if you find my advice helpful!
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post #23 of 103
Thread Starter 
OK, good info. Now, I hear all about 3d marks and core temps but do not know what software i need to do these test. Can someone point me in the right direction or at least list the ones i should have. I can google them with the name. thx...
ASUS G73 laptop
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post #24 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by broddam View Post
OK, good info. Now, I hear all about 3d marks and core temps but do not know what software i need to do these test. Can someone point me in the right direction or at least list the ones i should have. I can google them with the name. thx...
In my opinion, Intel's TAT is the best temp monitor for the Core 2 Duos. It can be found on the forums. It can be found in the downloads forum.

Edit- Here is the thread.
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post #25 of 103
You'll be fine so long as the HSF (Heat Sink Fan) is seated and you don't muck around with the pre-applied thermal paste. If there is a problem, it will shut down very shortly (a second or less?) after its very first boot.
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post #26 of 103
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chaos40 View Post
You'll be fine so long as the HSF (Heat Sink Fan) is seated and you don't muck around with the pre-applied thermal paste. If there is a problem, it will shut down very shortly (a second or less?) after its very first boot.

I thought i should remove the stuff already on it and use AS5 or something similar? Should I just go with whats on there from the factory?
ASUS G73 laptop
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ASUS G73 laptop
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post #27 of 103
I have the stock thermal compound on right now on my stock e6600 cooler and it's running 24C idle on TAT and 49C on TAT 100% load. I do have some AS5 but didnt bother cuz gunna replace HSF with something better when i do decide to overclock.

So... the regular compound isnt that bad.
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post #28 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by broddam View Post
I thought i should remove the stuff already on it and use AS5 or something similar? Should I just go with whats on there from the factory?
If you've purchased other thermal transfer grease, you can use it I suppose. You'll need to find the purest alcohol you can find at your local drugstore, get a cotton ball and very carefully remove ALL of the old stuff. Be as sure as you can that the surface is perfectly clean, then apply a small amount - no more than about the size of your thumbnail - to the HSF. That is the tricky part. Less is more, for the most part, when talking about thermal transfer paste/grease. If you put too much, you'll actually do more harm than good. If you put too little, your rig likely won't run cool and may not actually boot if the CPU heats up too much during POST.

The good part about using what is already pre-applied to the stock HSF is that you know it is the right amount, and is of sufficient quality to cool your CPU decently. Is it the best? No way. Nor is the stock HSF. But unless you want to aggressively overclock your CPU, it is perfectly fine.
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My Current System
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post #29 of 103
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chaos40 View Post
Be as sure as you can that the surface is perfectly clean, then apply a small amount - no more than about the size of your thumbnail - to the HSF. That is the tricky part. Less is more, for the most part, when talking about thermal transfer paste/grease.


I thought i read somewhere on here that it should be the size of a grain of rice? My thumbnail is alot larger than that....
ASUS G73 laptop
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ASUS G73 laptop
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CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
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post #30 of 103
A grain of rice isn't enough, I don't think. The objective is to ensure there is enough material to form a perfect bond between two imperfect surfaces. The top of the CPU and the bottom of the HSF look pretty darn smooth, but in reality there are many imperfections that would create "pockets" of air separating the HSF from the CPU. The paste fills that gap and acts as a thermal transfer conductor. If you put too much, it will get pushed off the sides of the chip and could actually act as a bit of an insulator on the sides of the CPU (bad).

If you put too little, there are too many unfilled pockets and the contact between the HSF and CPU is diminished (bad). So unless you've done it before, or are with someone with experience, it can be risky.

I think you're right, though... a thumbnail might be a bit too much. It really is a bit of a judgement thing.
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AMD Phenom II X2 555 Black Edition ASUS M4A79XTD EVO EAH6850  8GB DDR3 1600 
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600GB WD, 300GB WD Pioneer Blu-ray Windows 7 64bit 22" Acer LCD 
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IBM 71G4646 FRU# OCZ Fatal1ty OCZ550FTY 550W ATX12V v2.2 / EPS12V Antec Logitech MX500 
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SB Audigy 
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My Current System
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD Phenom II X2 555 Black Edition ASUS M4A79XTD EVO EAH6850  8GB DDR3 1600 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
600GB WD, 300GB WD Pioneer Blu-ray Windows 7 64bit 22" Acer LCD 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
IBM 71G4646 FRU# OCZ Fatal1ty OCZ550FTY 550W ATX12V v2.2 / EPS12V Antec Logitech MX500 
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SB Audigy 
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