Overclock.net › Forums › Cooling › Water Cooling › [Build Log] NZXT Phantom w/ XSPC Raystorm Twin D5 (updated w/ corsair 750d pics)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

[Build Log] NZXT Phantom w/ XSPC Raystorm Twin D5 (updated w/ corsair 750d pics)

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Hello everyone, I want to use this post as an introduction for myself and my project to your amazing forums. For years I have been lurking, reading, and learning. It's high time I contribute! This post will outline my experiences with light case modding, and more specifically the installation and use of the XSPC Raystorm AX240 twin D5 kit. I did my best to document the entire process I went through from start to finish so this will be a living thread in the sense that I will update it as often as I can with any modifications to the build or my process.

Specs are as follows
Intel dz77re-75k motherboard
16gb Corsair Dominator 1600
Intel 520 Series 320GB SSD
2X Intel320 Series 180 GB SSD's in Raid 0
2X ATI Radeon HD 7950 in crossfire
1200watt Enermax Evo S Galaxy PSU

Index

1. The Unboxing
2. Preparation
3. Case and Kit Setup
4. Installation
5. Finished Product
6. Conclusion and Lessons Learned



1. The Unboxing

After much stressing over UPS properly delivering this precious cargo to my apartment, it has arrived!

8tjj.jpg


...and the contents of this awesome box.

xw84.jpg



Now to see it laid out in all of it's glory, I carefully opened all the boxes, removed their contents, and promptly got distracted by the very awesome instruction manual XSPC provides to ease the installation process.

iqns.jpg


So I have verified all the pieces are here, stared at it for way too long, now to the next step...




2. Preperation

I have been reading about liquid cooling for the past several months, all across the web, spanning just about every forum and information repository that even makes mention of it. Watching worst case scenarios and professional setups on youtube, and basically trying to see every little bit of the entire process from start to finish.

Project preparation is an important tool for a successful liquid cooling setup. The individual components, how they connect, and the finished project all hinge on a thorough (and in my case painstaking) prep process

Cleaning your new kit! This is very important as during the manufacturing process when components are soldered, fitted, glued, and screwed together little bits of this and that can find their way inside of your critical components. First I rinsed the radiator thoroughly, with very hot sink water, extensive shaking and turning, and most importantly I kept a clear container handy to pour the water into so I could identify anything that may be coming out during this rinsing process. I repeated this process until the water was completely clear, with no scummy layer on top or any floating bits (no matter how small!). After the hot water rinsing I proceeded to rinse it several times with room temperature distilled water to remove anything the tap water may have left behind. The rest of the components also got a thorough rinsing with just distilled water, this includes the pumps, reservoir, and cpu block.

qd9s.jpg




3. Case and Kit Setup

Now that everything is clean, and ready to install I prepped my work space and brought the Phantom up to bat. I began to test fit the components, starting with the easiest piece for me to setup as I had already decided where it was going to go, the radiator. I decided on a top mount, even though I have already modded the case by removing the larger 3.5" cage in the bottom right, and under mounting the small 3.5" cage to the 5.25" cage on the right (front) of the case.

kzg1.jpg

The Phantom with my old h100i still mounted, all components still installed inside.

fqtt.jpg


The 5.25" dual bay reservoir got mounted next, one bay slot up from the bottom (don't ask why, just a personal preference).

2lmv.jpg

Next I soft mounted the cpu block, one thing I found is that it seems like these screws could be a tad bit longer, I had to apply a fair amount of pressure to get the opposite side screws in and I was not satisfied with how difficult it was. The whole process was difficult to the point that it made me feel like I was doing something wrong, but I couldn't really see a better way. With the radiator, reservoir (with attached pumps), and cpu block mounted I was ready to move on to the next phase.





4. Installation

With all of my components mounted in locations that suited my personal needs and aesthetic preference, I move on to the next phase of the process. Tubing runs were not a foreign concept to me but in such a small space with such expensive components I proceeded with caution. I chose to leave the entire length of tubing intact, push it onto one barb at a time, and run it off to the next component I wanted to attach to. I used a sharpie to make small marks noting where I wanted to cut my tubing a little farther down than my eye was telling me because in all cases I could not exactly line up the hose in the specific position it was going to sit on the component I was running to. I decided on a loop that runs like such pump/res -> radiator -> cpu block -> back to pump/res. I may change the ordering in the future after I have had time to break it in and do some stress testing.

rrav.jpg

2lmv.jpg


Next I stripped my case down, removing the video cards, ram, and motherboard, while leaving my newly created loop intact and still installed. I then proceeded to properly install the compression rings on all of my fittings which I had not yet done. A point of note here is that the provided fittings from XSPC were difficult not only to thread into the acrylic of the reservoir, but surprisingly the copper block as well. I gently started threading the fittings onto the block and found that I couldn't even get to the point of the o-ring contacting the block before I had to grab a tool (a quarter in this case) to apply more turning force on the fitting. This was rather frustrating because it seemed so finely milled, maybe its the fittings themselves being of lesser quality? I am not really sure, but upon removal of the fitting after seating it the first time I found very fine copper shavings inside the threading on the block. Again I don't know if it is the thread cut on the block or the fittings, but I was irritated to say the least. I cleaned them all up, and began the slow process of filling the reservoir after triple checking that all fittings were correctly installed and properly tightened. I had to create a ghetto funnel because all of mine were too large and I didn't want to cut any of them up.

3qbl.jpg


Now here is my rig with an alternate PSU sitting off to the side incase any serious leaks sprang up. Also visible is the very temporary wiring job for my pumps (and the super sweet reservoir LED that XSPC provided, it looks awesome).

8jcq.jpg

p2ph.jpg

wda6.jpg


Now that I have the loop installed I began filling the reservoir while flipping my psu on/off in 10 second intervals or so, depending on how quickly the reservoir started draining as the radiator and block fill and bleed. Over the course of about 10 minutes or so I successfully bled the system, which also involved some very careful reservoir capping while I tipped the case back and forth to break loose any air bubbles that may be in the radiator still. I set up a loose paper towel system for easy leak detection and let the system run for about 8 hours, checking on it every hour or so as time permitted.

klzt.jpg

qo9z.jpg

0dib.jpg





5. Finished Product

Here it is, the end result of all that hard work. I'm very happy with the way everything has turned out, and while some parts of the process were easier than others overall it's a very rewarding experience. Without further ado, this section will be just pictures of the project.

3e3n.jpg

6z7q.jpg

8k0l.jpg




6. Conclusion and Lessons Learned

Finishing this project was a dream come true for me. I have been thinking about and planning on doing something like this for years now, but for one reason or another never bothered to see it through. Buying XSPC's Raystorm kit as a starting point was probably the best decision I could have made. It comes with everything you need to be successful, including some very awesome instructions for every single component and an overall build guide. From the tubing, to the fittings, the reservoir and radiator, this kit is a beginners delight as far as water cooling is concerned.

Along the way I made a few mistakes, learned from them, and made sure I remembered them to share here to hopefully ensure even just one other persons success in this endeavor. First and foremost, keep an eye on the funnel _and_ the reservoir. It seems simple but I did accidentaly pour a little more water than I should have into the reservoir and had a small overflow. I am glad I took the time to strip all of the components out of my case though, including my solid state drives or else that could have turned ugly. Another thing that I also mentioned above is that I wish I had taken a few more test runs at dry mounting my compression fittings with tubing to any given component to get a better feel for how they tightened down, and how tight the compression ring needed to be. Looking back I feel I probably slightly over tightened the fittings which is highly frowned upon as it probably will damage the o-rings at the base of the fittings. I am slightly disappointed in myself for not choosing to use any dye additives, or dyed coolant, but I was going for function over form and know that using distilled water with a biocide and anti-corrosive additive is the smartest solution. When it comes time to change my water here in a few months I do plan on swapping my tubing to a colored tubing to make up for the lack of dye, with a possible matching or complimentary colored anti-kink coil.

Thank you all for taking the time to read my post. I am happy to have the knowledge of such an amazing community to ease my nerves about undertaking such a scary task. I hope that something I have written or displayed here, big or small, helps someone out there. Please feel free to post comments (good or bad), suggestions, and questions here, or PM me! I am always looking for ways to improve my methods, and look forward to the feedback of such awesome forums.
Edited by xerythul - 1/22/14 at 12:40am
post #2 of 6
Nice work! You going to be posting more pictures?
post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 
Yeah I'm having a custom bracket made for the radiator top mount so I have kept the case apart for the time being, but once I get the sides and top snapped back on I'll post some more pics.
post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 
Update here, getting a new piece of hardware soon, more specifically an asus maximus V formula. With any good luck I'll get it in and running soon enough with (hopefully) a custom radiator bracket on top to post.
post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 
Well I ended up getting my new motherboard, and decided some new fittings and tubing were in order to match a new case as well! I am in the process of sleeving up my ax1200 right now so I will post those pics later but here are a few new shots.







Edited by xerythul - 4/5/14 at 4:54pm
post #6 of 6
Looks good man, ever finish the sleeving? We want MOAR pictures... If you ever change the tubing back to clear tubing again you should get some UV reactive additive and some UV cold cathodes. It may be a bit out of fashion now, but back in the day when I was building loops I loved the look.
24/7 BENCH
(9 items)
 
  
CPUCPUMotherboardGraphics
LGA115x: i7 7700K, G3258,  LGA775:All E8xxx, Q/E6600, +50 others Z270X SOC, Z170M OCF, Z97 OCF, BlackOps, E-Power, G-Power, H-Power...WTB A-Power 
RAMCoolingCoolingPower
HYKO, X-PSC, MFR, BBSE, B-DIE, E-DIE Koolance CPU-LN2-V2 POT 2x360 RAD Custom Loop Seasonic Prime Platinum 1200W 
Case
Dimastech Easy V3.0 
  hide details  
Reply
24/7 BENCH
(9 items)
 
  
CPUCPUMotherboardGraphics
LGA115x: i7 7700K, G3258,  LGA775:All E8xxx, Q/E6600, +50 others Z270X SOC, Z170M OCF, Z97 OCF, BlackOps, E-Power, G-Power, H-Power...WTB A-Power 
RAMCoolingCoolingPower
HYKO, X-PSC, MFR, BBSE, B-DIE, E-DIE Koolance CPU-LN2-V2 POT 2x360 RAD Custom Loop Seasonic Prime Platinum 1200W 
Case
Dimastech Easy V3.0 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Water Cooling
Overclock.net › Forums › Cooling › Water Cooling › [Build Log] NZXT Phantom w/ XSPC Raystorm Twin D5 (updated w/ corsair 750d pics)