Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Memory › Stock overclocked RAM - what is the point - and am I wasting my money?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Stock overclocked RAM - what is the point - and am I wasting my money?

post #1 of 2
Thread Starter 
So I've got a friend who builds about 50 computers a year and is really into RAM - he's insisting I buy the highest clocked RAM I can afford - which would be 2400 DDR3 Trident G.Skill

My question is, why?

Doesn't this limit me in my ability to overclock my CPU and GPU significantly?

Is there really a need for RAM over 1600?

What, exactly, are the pro's and con's of overclocked stock RAM - besides it automatically negating your CPU's warranty with Intel.

Do the new Haswell's take advantage of anything here that is different from Sandy or Ivy Bridge?

Also, 32 GB of RAM - is there any reason for this much memory aside from "it's as much as I can get" for gamers? Is there ever going to be a point in this generation of hardware where 16 GB isn't enough?

In short - what are the pro's and con's of going with 2400 or 2133 DDR3 RAM - why would I want to go over 16 GB of RAM in a Haswell unit, and realistically for some one who renders videos, does a lot of digital artwork, games, and watches movies in 3D on his system what speed of RAM should I be going with?

FAQs on how RAM speed affects certain aspects of your experience are appreciated - it's all very confusing to me, and my friend seems to be uninterested in explaining all of this to me and more interested in just having me get the fastest RAM I can afford.

Also, is G.Skill the top dog in RAM? I've seen a lot of people talk about Corsair lately, what are your thoughts on that?

I know these are a lot of questions - so please go through and answer them one by one if you're educated enough in this department to give an answer.

I really do appreciate your time in helping me understand this matter.
post #2 of 2
If you do a lot of high res large format digital artwork it may be worth going to 32GB of ram. An easy way to see if you need the ram is to go open up one of your most demanding design files that you know slows you way down. then pull up the resource monitor. If you are getting a lot of hard faults(nearly constant) on your memory it is time to go with the larger set of ram.

I would like to think that the faster ram would make a difference though it would likely be entirely situation specific.

My self 16gb gets me by at work and at home with 98% of what i do. However i do occasionally justify the 32GB ram to my self because when a one hour task turns into three hours due to page file swapping I get VERY irritated.

At work I am running 16gb @ 1600mhz. It is great until I hit that page file, it is on a dell T3600 with a Xeon E5(-2643 IIRC). Normal workload is photoshop, illustrator, coreldraw, autoCAD, versaworks, mostly all open concurrently with a few tabs in chrome and a helper app sitting in a XP mode VM.

Though like i said, as soon as it starts pushing memory on disk I hate life. Occasionally if i have some high detail/effects graphics going it will get really bad during effect updates or sometime effects are fine but when i cycle through programs the third or fourth one you pull back up had been pushed to disk and you get to sit back for a minute or two at a time and wait for it to make space in ram then pull the data you need back into ram.

IMHO if you are working on things that are at all time sensitive and you think you are close to maxing 16gb just spend the extra bucks and go 32. That page file swap will kill you far more times over than the difference between 1600 and 2400 IMO. Especially if your working.


My home machine (build in sig) I'm running that exact Gskill ram in question here and I can say that intel XTU score goes up a few hundred running the XMP profile vs the auto config @ 1600mhz. However it is my understanding that even with an SSD your hard drive loads are going to be bottle necked by sata and the drive before the ram.
ROG - D-Frame
(26 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
4770k Maximus VI Extreme Asus GTX 780 DCII Gskill Trident 2400Mhz 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
Kingston v300 Caviar Black Asus External Slim Blu Ray Drive Corsair AF120 Performance Edition 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
EK XTX CoolStream 480 RAD EK M6E Nickel Motherboard Block EK DDC X-Res 140 w/ 3.25 DDC Pump EK Asus GTX780 DCII GPU Block 
CoolingCoolingCoolingOS
PrimoChill 1/2" Rigid Acrylic Tube - Red PrimoChill Ghost Compression Fittings - Ano Black Corsair SP120 PWM Performance Edition Microsoft Windows 8.1 Pro 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
X-Star 1440p 27" IPS Display Logitech G710+ EVGA Supernova NEX 1500 In-Win D-Frame 
MouseMouse PadAudioOther
Logitech G602 Corsair Vengeance MM200 Asus Xonar Phoebus Custom CNC Case Riser / Radiator Housing 
OtherOther
Pioneer SP-PK22BS & SW-8MK2 5.2 Channel Speakers Sony STR-DH550 5.2 Channel A/V Receiver  
  hide details  
Reply
ROG - D-Frame
(26 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
4770k Maximus VI Extreme Asus GTX 780 DCII Gskill Trident 2400Mhz 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
Kingston v300 Caviar Black Asus External Slim Blu Ray Drive Corsair AF120 Performance Edition 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
EK XTX CoolStream 480 RAD EK M6E Nickel Motherboard Block EK DDC X-Res 140 w/ 3.25 DDC Pump EK Asus GTX780 DCII GPU Block 
CoolingCoolingCoolingOS
PrimoChill 1/2" Rigid Acrylic Tube - Red PrimoChill Ghost Compression Fittings - Ano Black Corsair SP120 PWM Performance Edition Microsoft Windows 8.1 Pro 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
X-Star 1440p 27" IPS Display Logitech G710+ EVGA Supernova NEX 1500 In-Win D-Frame 
MouseMouse PadAudioOther
Logitech G602 Corsair Vengeance MM200 Asus Xonar Phoebus Custom CNC Case Riser / Radiator Housing 
OtherOther
Pioneer SP-PK22BS & SW-8MK2 5.2 Channel Speakers Sony STR-DH550 5.2 Channel A/V Receiver  
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Memory
Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Memory › Stock overclocked RAM - what is the point - and am I wasting my money?