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Project Hardwood - Scratch built exotic wood water cooled PC end table - Page 5

post #41 of 50
Thread Starter 
I was pretty busy with honey do's over the weekend so I didn't accomplish quite as much as I hoped. I'm pretty satisfied with the progress though. I got my shrouds modified with the new panels around three sides of the fans, got the exhaust duct glued up, and got most of the pieces cut for the intake duct.

I thought someone might be interested in what tools I'm using so I snapped a few pics along the way. I'm just using portable contractor grade tools in my garage but I get decent results because I take a little time to tune up the tools and make sure they are as accurate as possible. I also use blades that are suited to the type of cuts I'm making, even on my circular saw, which I use to cut down larger sheets into more manageable sizes. Another key is planning your cuts in advance so that you only set your fences or guides a single time and make all the matching cuts without disturbing those settings.

The factory edges on MDF are generally straight but they are rough so I start by running the factory edge across my router table, setup for jointing.




And you can see how square and straight the resulting edge is when a big 1/2" thick panel easily stands on it's edge without support.




My tablesaw is just a Dewalt contractor model I picked up on clearance at Home Depot. The top is pretty small but it's actually impressively accurate for the price.




It only takes a minute to crank the blade up and make sure it's exactly at 90 degrees to the table top but it makes all the difference in the accuracy of your cuts.




Straight cuts with the correct blade and lots of clamps make for strong and square joints.




Outside of a modified fan shroud




Inside of a modified fan shroud




And here is how accurately cut and glued MDF joints should look




The exhaust duct glued up and clamped




The sides of the intake duct cut and ready for fitting.




Kinda hard to see in this pic but this is the bottom panel which is cut a little over sized for right now. I've got a roll of 1/8" closed cell foam so I'm adding a layer on top of the panel. Rather than gluing the ducts and shrouds and all to the bottom, all of it will sit on the foam for some additional vibration isolation. I haven't decided for sure how to secure everything but very little force is needed so I'll probably just add some weak springs to hold the parts up against each other.


Edited by iScream1 - 2/23/14 at 7:42pm
post #42 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by iScream1 View Post

I was able to do some work on my model the last couple evenings. I'll be adding a 1.5" wide lip around three sides of the shrouds, as shown in the pic below. I also simplified the inner ducting while adding support for the power supply and pump. I'm not even going to try modeling the flexible tubing but it should be pretty obvious by looking at the pump orientation along with the radiator barbs and barbs coming down from the motherboard chamber. Those will actually be quick disconnects but I'm not going to spend a bunch of time modeling them.



If anyone sees a problem, please let me know. I'm planning to build the bottom section this weekend and it will look very much like the model.





























 



Looking good
You know, if you mirror the exhaust to the intake (creating some S-shape) you can cut the noise further down, esspecially if you would line the wall/board opposite the fans with something like dynamat.
The thing about those Silverstones is that IF they need to ramp up to max, they WILL make themselves heard smile.gif
Air doesn't mind "going around corners", while sound does... using S-shape baffles will cut noise down with at least 50%
post #43 of 50
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RnRollie View Post

Looking good
You know, if you mirror the exhaust to the intake (creating some S-shape) you can cut the noise further down, esspecially if you would line the wall/board opposite the fans with something like dynamat.
The thing about those Silverstones is that IF they need to ramp up to max, they WILL make themselves heard smile.gif
Air doesn't mind "going around corners", while sound does... using S-shape baffles will cut noise down with at least 50%

Thanks. I like the idea of adding more bends to the air baffles but it would result in my exhaust going out the front of my case instead of the side opposite of the couch. I do have a box of Stinger Roadkill in the garage and I may apply some in a few areas.

Since the table will only be about 8 inches from the wall on the back side, I expect some fan noise to bounce off and up from the wall. If it's a problem, I'll use a combination of foam and dense fabric to absorb and diffuse as much sound as possible before it can bounce off the wall. Picture the heavy drapes lining the walls of a movie theater, inside the intake baffle. There will also be a filter back there which should help a bit.

When it came time to actually start building the baffles, I shifted everything except the pump an additional inch toward the back. That should give me room to box in the pump. Unfortunately, I'm still a newb at Sketchup so I didn't make components out of the baffle sections and they're stuck together now. I'll figure out how to separate them sometime but just don't have time to mess with it right now.

-Chris
post #44 of 50
Oh man , really nice!
Subbed because i have a wood&metal fetish.
post #45 of 50
Very nice thumb.gif
post #46 of 50
Looks flammable.

SUBBED.biggrin.gif

Seriously though looks cool.
post #47 of 50
Thread Starter 
Didn't get the chance to do much this weekend but I did get the hard part of the rear baffle done, which is the notched corner. Rather than try to cut my lengths perfectly, you can see that I left a little edge around the outside. Sixty seconds on the router table with a flush trim bit and the lip is gone, leaving a very nice edge.













post #48 of 50
Thread Starter 
Made a little more progress. The front and rear baffles are pretty much done. I wasn't happy with how much the ducts would flex so I decided to box everything in. I'm going to radius the top edge and then spray primer or something on the top surfaces so drips from popping a quick disconnect won't hurt the MDF.










post #49 of 50
subbed smile.gif

Looks great so far!
post #50 of 50
Thread Starter 
Not much new to report. I built a crude but very sturdy test bench so I can put my loop together with the flexible tube and then actually bring up the computer to see how my cooling works. I built it to a comfortable height to work with, rather than the intended height of my actual end table. The space between the motherboard panel and the ducting below should be pretty close though.

Picked up a couple gallons of distilled water to flush my rad and fill the loop for testing. I'm probably going to run red Mayhems with UV once I get the real table constructed.

I powered up all four fans and I'm pretty happy with the ducting. If I really crank up the speed they make some noise but I got four of them so that I shouldn't need to run them that fast. I was pretty impressed by the amount of air those things move when I do crank them though.

I'll cut notches in the sides of the shrouds soon and route the power and speed control wiring through.







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