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How do i go about replacing or reformatted a failed raid 1 drive?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I went to start up one of my computers and i get this screen?

 

How do i find out which of the 2 HDD's has failed or needs to be reformatted,

and will the raid controller automatically Rebuild the array after i replace the the bad HDD?

I setup this array with 2 hard drives about a year and a half ago. (when the computer was built with all new components).

 

Specs:

Operating System

MS Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit SP1

 

CPU

AMD Phenom II X6 1055T

 

RAM

4.0GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 669MHz (9-9-9-24)

 

Motherboard

ASUSTeK Computer INC. M4A88TD-V EVO/USB3 (AM3)

 

Graphics

NVIDIA GeForce GT 430

 

Hard Drives

488GB Seagate ST3500413AS SCSI Disk Device (RAID)

488GB Seagate ST3500413AS SCSI Disk Device (RAID)

 

 

Thanks in advance

 

 

post #2 of 8
Thread Starter 

BTW the computer is still booting and running fine on 1 HDD

post #3 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by unknown601 View Post


How do i find out which of the 2 HDD's has failed or needs to be reformatted,
and will the raid controller automatically Rebuild the array after i replace the the bad HDD?
I setup this array with 2 hard drives about a year and a half ago. (when the computer was built with all new components).

It tells you which drive is bad -- Port 2 is reporting a S.M.A.R.T. pre-failure, so that's the one that's going bad. It's probably not bad yet, but imminent failure is likely.

Turn the system off, replace the disk on Port 2, and then go into your RAID BIOS. It should have an option to rebuild the array. I doubt it will automatically rebuild the array. Generally, rebuilding an array on a motherboard-based software RAID controller is something that must be done IN the BIOS, and you have to WAIT until it's finished. The controller isn't smart enough to rebuild an array in the background (e.g. while the OS is running, and data is being accessed).

If the drive on Port 2 is under warranty, send it back to Seagate for a replacement. If it's not under warranty, throw it away. Once SMART reports errors, the drive Is suspect and not able to be trusted with important data.

Give yourself a gold star! You may have prevented data loss and a re-format. =) I do hope you still have a solid backup/image of the system though, if the first drive fails during the rebuild, or has an unrecoverable data error, you will lose some or all of your data.

Greg
post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thanks Greg

I don't have a backup of the drives the 2 raid drives are it ,

so i should get a another drive and backup drive 1 to it then replace drive 2 and rebuild the array?


Edited by unknown601 - 2/27/14 at 3:19pm
post #5 of 8
I would absolutely go out and get an external drive specifically for backup purposes. RAID 1 is no substitute for routine backups. Consider that a motherboard controller failure, PSU, or power surge can take out BOTH of your internal hard drives, or that malware, viruses, user error, flood/fire/earthquakes/tornadoes, and physical theft are all real-world possibilities that could affect you in the near or long term.

Get a backup of your current system before you monkey with your RAID settings. If you accidentally pull the wrong drive, or re-initialize the wrong drive, you could end up with a newly blank "good" drive and a unreadable "bad" drive.

Greg
post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 

Yeah im going to buy a 1tb external drive to backup the raid drive to then replace the bad one.

Then i can just set the external to make backup's for safe keeping.

 

Btw what is the best way to backup an entire drive?

Should i use the windows backup software or do it manually?

post #7 of 8
Windows 7 Ultimate has a very suitable backup utility built-in. It can create complete system images that work well with the Windows Repair process when booting from a install disc or repair CD. The option you want to use is "System Image Backup" -- at least that's what I remember from the Windows 7 days. Windows 8 has similar functionality, but it's buried deep in control panel under File Recovery.

If you want more control with scheduling, partial/incremental backups, etc. then I recommend either Acronis True Image or Macrium Reflect. Both are excellent products, but neither is free.

Greg
post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 

I just bought the new drive and a 2TB external drive to backup to, then i will replace the bad Raid drive.

 

I will post again after im done.


Edited by unknown601 - 3/4/14 at 12:59am
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