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Where is windows Disk Cleanup finding 25GB of Temporary Files to delete on my 56GB SSD Windows Drive? - Page 3

post #21 of 31
Thread Starter 
By manually looking using Shadow11377's Method I found:

A 6GB file titled "hiberfil.sys" in the root of the C: Drive (SSD)
Searching it tells me that its used by windows for hibernating? Which is strange because this is a PC, not a laptop, and its never given me the option to hibernate, nor have I ever manually done it :/
winsxs also takes 12GB, which I have no idea why. I understand that it keeps windows update files, but in the Disk Cleanup option, Windows Update Cleanup + Service Backup Files are less than 1GB


After Using WidDirStat, I found that;

Windows takes up 60% of the drive at 32GB
with winsxs at 12GB taking up 38% of that of the windows file,
and installer at 6.4GB taking up 20%
Microsoft.NET and Temp proceed with 1.1GB and 950MB

"hiberfil.sys" takes up takes up 11% of the drive, with 6GB as stated previously.

Program files at 10% with 5GB, in it:
A file titled NIVIDIA Corporation (is this the driver or the extracted installer?) at 2.2GB
Mircosoft SQL server at 1.2GB (I tried to install this however it needed space on the drive which I didn't have, thus I had to cancel the installation.)

Users at 8.5% with 4.5GB
with Temp in AppData Local taking up 2.5GB

"Common Files" in "Program Files (x86)" using 1GB
what is common files used for? And why is Adobe part of it, Why does Adobe have to be on the C: Drive? (Even when a program like Photoshop is installed on the main drive?)

The rest are relatively low

On the side window, excluding the necessary things;
.msp files take up 4GB of space at 7.5% of the drive
.exe files take up 4GB of space at 7.5% of the drive
and .msi files take up 1.8GB, at 3.4% of the drive

Sorry for the delay guys. As I said, I've been busy and unable to find time.
post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan950 View Post

By manually looking using Shadow11377's Method I found:

A 6GB file titled "hiberfil.sys" in the root of the C: Drive (SSD)
Searching it tells me that its used by windows for hibernating? Which is strange because this is a PC, not a laptop, and its never given me the option to hibernate, nor have I ever manually done it :/

Hibernate is enabled by default on all Win7 & Win8 systems. (Can't remember if this also true for Vista as well - it has been a quite since the last time I touched a Vista system). For laptops, it is definitely useful. However on desktop PCs, I always turn it off. I see little point in using it. To do so, launch the command prompt with elevated admin rights.

Once you are at the cursor, type the following with no quotes:
"powercfg -h off"
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan950 View Post

winsxs also takes 12GB, which I have no idea why. I understand that it keeps windows update files, but in the Disk Cleanup option, Windows Update Cleanup + Service Backup Files are less than 1GB

That folder is also better known as the "Windows side-by-side" folder. For lack of a better word, it is used for Windows file integrity purposes. For example, if you ever launch the Windows file checker, it compares a windows file on your hard drive with the one in the cache to see if it is the same or not. If it is corrupt or altered in any way, it replaces that one w/ the one in the side by side cache.

I'm giving you the basic ghist of it, but I'm sure there is much more to it than that. I've read links that go into much further depth - it gets very technical and I don't think it has any relevance to solving this mystery of where the 25 GB is coming from.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan950 View Post

Users at 8.5% with 4.5GB
with Temp in AppData Local taking up 2.5GB

That is pretty normal. Although I must say that 4.5 GB is a bit on the high side. That being said, roughly 1/2 of that is being taken up by temp files. 2.5 GB of the total 4.5 GB. Speaking of which, a question for you - how many users have ever logged onto this machine? If there have been more than 1, or if you have logged into the default admin account, there might also be some residue temp files under the (default) administrator account. Using Windows Explorer, navigate to the following and see what is contained in:
C:\Users\Administrator\AppData\Local\Temp
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan950 View Post

"Common Files" in "Program Files (x86)" using 1GB
what is common files used for? And why is Adobe part of it, Why does Adobe have to be on the C: Drive? (Even when a program like Photoshop is installed on the main drive?)

Check out:
What is the purpose of the Common Files folder in Program Files?

And also this:
http://www.theeldergeek.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=23407
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan950 View Post

On the side window, excluding the necessary things;
.msp files take up 4GB of space at 7.5% of the drive
.exe files take up 4GB of space at 7.5% of the drive
and .msi files take up 1.8GB, at 3.4% of the drive

Where are these exe files? Inside the temp folder? You have executables and MSI files taking up much more space than I would feel comfortable with on a 60 GB drive. Personally, I would delete them (or atleast move them temporary to another HDD/flash drive/separate partition...whatever). but first make sure that they are not needed by a program.

As for the original query of where the 25 GB that Windows Cleanup is reporting... that mystery deepens now. I don't see anywhere in your Windir stat report where this 25 GB is coming from. It is still "early" for me and I haven't even had my 2nd cup of coffee. I'll have to go make another coffee run and take a 2nd look after I've had more caffeine in my system. It is a possibility that the Windows cleanup service is mis-reporting that amount of space it has to clean up. On a 60 GB SSD, I find it hard to believe that Windows could clean up that much.
Edited by DaChosenOne - 3/4/14 at 7:03am
post #23 of 31
The manual method to compare folder sizes probably fails with the WinSxS folder. The files in there are existing in multiple places at once. Files in other places on C:\Windows are often not real, instead links into the WinSxS folder. If you look up folder sizes in the File Explorer, it won't get that fact, won't understand that the files only take up place once on the drive.

You should really use a tool like WinDirStat or SpaceSniffer. I'd hope those won't get confused by files being links into WinSxS. You'd also probably save a lot of time. Scanning all of C: takes about 10 seconds for SpaceSniffer on an SSD.
post #24 of 31
The hiberfil.sys is also used for "hybrid sleep" in Windows 8, it speeds up restarts from a cold shutdown state, but with an SSD you probably don't need it as much as with a HDD - so hiberfil.sys can go away. As mentioned previously, do a "powercfg -h off" from an elevated command prompt.

DO NOT attempt to manually delete anything in the Winsxs folder. Here is an official MSFT article on the topic of excess filesystem space tied up in WinSXS. Notice the bit about NTFS hard links, etc. There is a MSFT provided utility to clean this content up:

•Windows 7 Service Pack 1 or Windows Server 2008 R2 Service Pack 1 installed: DISM /online /Cleanup-Image /SpSuperseded or Disk Cleanup Wizard (cleanmgr.exe)

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2795190

The same page points out another potential space saving technique - to delete unneeded system restore points.

Greg
post #25 of 31
Do you have the pagefile enabled as well? If so, there should be a pagefile.sys, and that can take up a few gigabytes.

hiberfile.sys = Data for Hibernation
pagefile.sys = Page File / HDD (Virtual) Memory dump

Neither of these are essential to Windows, the page file simply allows you to use more than your installed ram (slowly, on the HDD) without crashing and hibernate allows you to unplug your pc, then plug it back in and be left off where you were, windows open and everything. (Hibernate before unplugging, obv)
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post #26 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shadow11377 View Post

Do you have the pagefile enabled as well? If so, there should be a pagefile.sys, and that can take up a few gigabytes.

hiberfile.sys = Data for Hibernation
pagefile.sys = Page File / HDD (Virtual) Memory dump

Neither of these are essential to Windows....

"not essential to windows" yeah. ok. so are you suggesting to the OP that he should run his computer without a pagefile? .../rolls eyes. That's nuts - how do know how much RAM the OP has and whether he needs it ornot? Wait let me guess, you're clairevoyant. What if he only had 4 GB RAM - would you still suggest the same? (I'm almost afraid of the answer).
post #27 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shadow11377 View Post

Do you have the pagefile enabled as well? If so, there should be a pagefile.sys, and that can take up a few gigabytes.

hiberfile.sys = Data for Hibernation
pagefile.sys = Page File / HDD (Virtual) Memory dump

Neither of these are essential to Windows, the page file simply allows you to use more than your installed ram (slowly, on the HDD) without crashing and hibernate allows you to unplug your pc, then plug it back in and be left off where you were, windows open and everything. (Hibernate before unplugging, obv)

Wrong, pagefile is necessary regardless of how much ram you have. Programs will not function properly without it, and disabling it completely will cause problems. So I would suggest keeping a page file no less than 1GB.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaChosenOne View Post

"not essential to windows" yeah. ok. so are you suggesting to the OP that he should run his computer without a pagefile? .../rolls eyes. That's nuts - how do know how much RAM the OP has and whether he needs it ornot? Wait let me guess, you're clairevoyant. What if he only had 4 GB RAM - would you still suggest the same? (I'm almost afraid of the answer).

Agreed, disabling page file is ridiculous and causes some major issues which will make you wish you hadn't disabled it.
post #28 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaChosenOne View Post

"not essential to windows" yeah. ok. so are you suggesting to the OP that he should run his computer without a pagefile? .../rolls eyes. That's nuts - how do know how much RAM the OP has and whether he needs it ornot? Wait let me guess, you're clairevoyant. What if he only had 4 GB RAM - would you still suggest the same? (I'm almost afraid of the answer).

What's your problem? I simply told him what each does, and stated clearly that the pagefile allows you to use more ram than you have installed without crashing things. FYI, windows can run perfect without a pagefile as well. The only issue is that if you attempt to use more ram than you have installed, things will start crashing. Educate yourself on things before acting like you know everything, please.
Quote:
Originally Posted by XAslanX View Post

Wrong, pagefile is necessary regardless of how much ram you have. Programs will not function properly without it, and disabling it completely will cause problems. So I would suggest keeping a page file no less than 1GB.
Agreed, disabling page file is ridiculous and causes some major issues which will make you wish you hadn't disabled it.

Absolutely wrong, a pagefile is not at all necessary. It is simply a nice feature that is usually best left enabled, but in some cases it helps to relocate it to a second drive if one is available.
You ran run Windows forever with no pagefile enabled, but if you open too many applications, they will begin to crash one by one, or in groups. If you have 4GB of RAM and only use a web browser, it's likely you'll not see crashes at all. Most programs function perfectly without a pagefile, disabling it completely can cause problems but isn't guaranteed to.

I cannot disagree that disabling the page file is a bad idea, unless you have a specific reason to, but relocating it if it's taking up a lot of your space on an SSD is something to consider.




OP, if you find your pagefile.sys and hiberfil.sys are taking up a lot of space, here are your options.

pagefile.sys
-Can be disabled, but doing so will cause applications to crash if you go over your RAM limit. However, if you stay under it you will be perfectly fine.
-Can be made smaller, but Windows likes to auto-resize it so this doesn't work all the time.
-Cab be relocated to drive other than your SSD, easily.

hiberfil.sys
-Can be disabled, but doing so will cause loss of access to hibernation. If you do not use hibernation you might consider doing this. If you frequently hibernate your PC, keep it.
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post #29 of 31
Thread Starter 
The reason I did not state a pagefile is because it was already located on my main drive.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaChosenOne View Post

Hibernate is enabled by default on all Win7 & Win8 systems. (Can't remember if this also true for Vista as well - it has been a quite since the last time I touched a Vista system). For laptops, it is definitely useful. However on desktop PCs, I always turn it off. I see little point in using it. To do so, launch the command prompt with elevated admin rights.

Once you are at the cursor, type the following with no quotes:
"powercfg -h off"
Quote:
Originally Posted by hammong View Post

The hiberfil.sys is also used for "hybrid sleep" in Windows 8, it speeds up restarts from a cold shutdown state, but with an SSD you probably don't need it as much as with a HDD - so hiberfil.sys can go away. As mentioned previously, do a "powercfg -h off" from an elevated command prompt.

DO NOT attempt to manually delete anything in the Winsxs folder. Here is an official MSFT article on the topic of excess filesystem space tied up in WinSXS. Notice the bit about NTFS hard links, etc. There is a MSFT provided utility to clean this content up:

•Windows 7 Service Pack 1 or Windows Server 2008 R2 Service Pack 1 installed: DISM /online /Cleanup-Image /SpSuperseded or Disk Cleanup Wizard (cleanmgr.exe)

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2795190

The same page points out another potential space saving technique - to delete unneeded system restore points.

Greg
Does the "hybrid sleep" in also happen in windows 7? As I've said, I've never had the option to hibernate, or intentionally hibernated, so I have no idea why that file is there. How would it get there?
Will using the powercfg cmd prompt instantly delete the hiberfil.sys file? or is there something else I should also do?
Should I run Disk Cleanup before entering the command?

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaChosenOne View Post

That folder is also better known as the "Windows side-by-side" folder. For lack of a better word, it is used for Windows file integrity purposes. For example, if you ever launch the Windows file checker, it compares a windows file on your hard drive with the one in the cache to see if it is the same or not. If it is corrupt or altered in any way, it replaces that one w/ the one in the side by side cache.

I'm giving you the basic ghist of it, but I'm sure there is much more to it than that. I've read links that go into much further depth - it gets very technical and I don't think it has any relevance to solving this mystery of where the 25 GB is coming from.
Would this be part of it? Should I be removing it? Will Disk Cleanup remove it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaChosenOne View Post

That is pretty normal. Although I must say that 4.5 GB is a bit on the high side. That being said, roughly 1/2 of that is being taken up by temp files. 2.5 GB of the total 4.5 GB. Speaking of which, a question for you - how many users have ever logged onto this machine? If there have been more than 1, or if you have logged into the default admin account, there might also be some residue temp files under the (default) administrator account. Using Windows Explorer, navigate to the following and see what is contained in:
C:\Users\Administrator\AppData\Local\Temp
Only 1 user, Myself.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaChosenOne View Post

Where are these exe files? Inside the temp folder? You have executables and MSI files taking up much more space than I would feel comfortable with on a 60 GB drive. Personally, I would delete them (or atleast move them temporary to another HDD/flash drive/separate partition...whatever). but first make sure that they are not needed by a program.
A huge majority of the .msp, and .msi files are located in the Windows/Installer folder. I have nothing to do with them.
The .exe's are all over the place really, but its the quantity of them that make up the space. Most of them are leftovers of, or part of installing programs. Again, I don't choose to put them there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaChosenOne View Post

As for the original query of where the 25 GB that Windows Cleanup is reporting... that mystery deepens now. I don't see anywhere in your Windir stat report where this 25 GB is coming from. It is still "early" for me and I haven't even had my 2nd cup of coffee. I'll have to go make another coffee run and take a 2nd look after I've had more caffeine in my system. It is a possibility that the Windows cleanup service is mis-reporting that amount of space it has to clean up. On a 60 GB SSD, I find it hard to believe that Windows could clean up that much.

That's what I originally thought. But gee It would be nice to see 25GB gone without any further problems. How much GB is a standard SDD with windows and some programs on it total up to be anyway? How much of my data is uneeded?
Should I go ahead and run Disk Cleanup now (before or after turning off hibernate) or is there anything else you guys want to look at before I do so?

Cheers.
post #30 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan950 View Post

Does the "hybrid sleep" in also happen in windows 7? As I've said, I've never had the option to hibernate, or intentionally hibernated, so I have no idea why that file is there. How would it get there?
Will using the powercfg cmd prompt instantly delete the hiberfil.sys file? or is there something else I should also do?

If you run the command line that I gave you, the hibernate file will go away. yes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan950 View Post

Should I run Disk Cleanup before entering the command?

Does not matter. The disk cleanup has nothing to do w/ hibernate and will not touch that file regardless of whether hibernate is enabled or not.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan950 View Post

Would this be part of it? Should I be removing it? Will Disk Cleanup remove it?

No. As mentioned by Hammong above, do not attempt to delete anything inside WinSxS folder.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan950 View Post

A huge majority of the .msp, and .msi files are located in the Windows/Installer folder. I have nothing to do with them.

I would leave those alone.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan950 View Post

The .exe's are all over the place really, but its the quantity of them that make up the space. Most of them are leftovers of, or part of installing programs. Again, I don't choose to put them there.

if the *.exe files are in any of the following folders, it is perfectly safe to delete
C:\Temp
C:\Windows\Temp
C:\Users\{Username}\AppData\Local\Temp
C:\Users\{Username}\AppData\Local Low\Temp
C:\Users\Username}\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Files

(Oh and speaking of browsers, do you use Firefox, Google Chrome, or any other alternate browser?? Try clearing your cache if you are using one of these).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan950 View Post

That's what I originally thought. But gee It would be nice to see 25GB gone without any further problems. How much GB is a standard SDD with windows and some programs on it total up to be anyway? How much of my data is uneeded?
Should I go ahead and run Disk Cleanup now (before or after turning off hibernate) or is there anything else you guys want to look at before I do so?

Cheers.

I slept very poorly last night so it's possible I may be missing something, but from my viewpoint, there is not much else you can do except to run the disk cleanup and see what happens. I would take a snapshot of the hard drive space before & after using Windir stat. Some of the more intelligent people in this thread (Hammong & Deepor) have given good suggestions - let's see if they have any further input before you run the disk cleanup.
Edited by DaChosenOne - 3/5/14 at 10:55am
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