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Are my expectations of having video apps on SteamOS realistic? - Page 2

post #11 of 33
Isn't controller support built into the kernel? As in, won't most distros with a modern kernel version have similar controller support out of the box?

However, SteamOS is not simply Debian + Steam. From personal experience here using the OS on my own Steam machine, it's a very different experience from most Linux distrobutions. Everything is seamless. Even in its current beta form it has more polish than a typical distro. There's also:

Quote:
Originally Posted by http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=MTU0MzY 

Xcompmgr is a simple composite manager for X11 written a long time ago by Keith Packard and doesn't see too much activitity these days. The xcompmgr package is still popular though among lightweight Linux users. In looking through the code, steamos-compositor is much-changed compared to upstream xcompmgr. The diff between steamos-compositor and upstream xcompmgr is over a 4,200 line patch.

SteamOS is using the Linux 3.10 kernel, but it's not a vanilla kernel. There's many patches added onto the Linux 3.10 kernel for SteamOS, particularly taken from the real-time patch-set and other changes. As pointed out by a Phoronix reader, "SteamOS appears to be using linux 3.10 - PREEMPT_RT_FULL (unsurprisingly) with a heavy amount of patching (282 patches for -rt in the 'all' architectures/folder, alone). The kernel is also using aufs and they seem to be sitting on some bug fixes for upstream on top of that. Some of the -rt related hacks they are using i have seen (in one case, i am using the same patch for ntrig)... It looks like they have gone to a lot of effort getting the kernel just right for their needs."
post #12 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrak View Post

There is NO difference between SteamOS and Mint or Ubuntu.

SteamOS = Debian ( http://www.debian.org/, again nothing special )

The only thing they've done is set up Steam to automatically start on boot, and go to Big Picture mode. You can do this on any machine that you can install Steam on ( Windows, Mac, Linux ) through the settings menu in Steam.

Mint is built on Ubuntu and Ubuntu is built on Debian

Linux Mint Debian Edition ( LMDE ) is built on Debian as well.

See where we're getting at? It's all the same at the end of the day, aside from Steam not really using Debian's package repository but their own, which is what is messing them up.

Controller support is built into the Steam client for Big Picture mode. All ( major ) controllers are basically plug and play when in Big Picture mode.



And quite frankly, you'll have better support on Mint or Ubuntu for anything you do than you will on SteamOS.


There is NOTHING special about SteamOS.

custom compositor?

Also, if you install steamOS in a copy of mint or ubuntu it appears in the login menu and runs the compositor too, which is an excellent way to choose what you want on boot thumb.gif
post #13 of 33
If we're going to put emphasis on a compositor as any kind of argument for being "special" or "different", then I'm sad to say the world is becoming a very sad place. It's really not all that special, nor are the low latency patches or real time preempt patches on the kernel. Those are things anyone can do if they really wanted to ( kernel.org has guides for them and has for some time, and some distributions use them as well ).

There's really nothing to call home about. And yes, I have used it, and still use it, and have probably gone deeper into it than most on this forum. Sorry that I don't consider minor patches or forks special.
Edited by Shrak - 3/5/14 at 7:29pm
post #14 of 33
The thing is that while "Those are things anyone can do if they really wanted to", they don't have to. Here's an OS with all of that kernel patching and testing done for you. Then there's the compositor, which is exclusive to SteamOS at the moment. Again, it's installed and ready to rock right out of the box.

The little stuff is worth noting as well, such as the spiffy Steam logo boot screen. I tried to set something like that up on Arch months ago, and I couldn't get it to work. If I remember correctly it was something to do with using the Nvidia blob with KMS. Anyway, I didn't have to set it up on SteamOS. Saying that "NOTHING" is special about the OS is just wrong. It has a lot going for it, regardless of the value you personally place on what they have done so far.
post #15 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ferrari8608 View Post

The thing is that while "Those are things anyone can do if they really wanted to", they don't have to. Here's an OS with all of that kernel patching and testing done for you.

And what good is it doing anyone? Not at all that much if any. Go read about the patches they've done, actually research them and what they do.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ferrari8608 View Post

Then there's the compositor, which is exclusive to SteamOS at the moment. Again, it's installed and ready to rock right out of the box.

Try again.

And really? Are we still on a compositor kick here? Do you even know what a compositor is or how meaningless it is as a whole? Especially when it's a fork of a well known and widely used one, and a reinvented wheel with all the other 2000 compositors out there. GET OVER THE COMPOSITOR.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ferrari8608 View Post

It has a lot going for it, regardless of the value you personally place on what they have done so far.

Personally I think you place too much value on the little things they've done with SteamOS and the minor changes they've made.


I'm done arguing though. Not worth it at the end of the day.
Edited by Shrak - 3/5/14 at 10:02pm
post #16 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrak View Post

If we're going to put emphasis on a compositor as any kind of argument for being "special" or "different", then I'm sad to say the world is becoming a very sad place. It's really not all that special, nor are the low latency patches or real time preempt patches on the kernel. Those are things anyone can do if they really wanted to ( kernel.org has guides for them and has for some time, and some distributions use them as well ).

There's really nothing to call home about. And yes, I have used it, and still use it, and have probably gone deeper into it than most on this forum. Sorry that I don't consider minor patches or forks special.

you really are an argumentative git at times redface.gif

your calling me sad? fine, you said there was nothing special, well valve has made many customisations and commits to their 'os'
post #17 of 33
Thread Starter 
Are people seriously arguing over a little post I made about Steam OS? I'm just saying that I would like to use my controller for navigating the OS from my bed or chair, I kind of only want to use the keyboard and mouse for things that require them. I just think that since Steam OS can boot into Big Picture mode from the start, then it would be easier to navigate around the OS. I have no idea what a compositor is and honestly, I do not have a large amount of expertise and knowledge about Linux, I am a hardware guy first and a software guy second. I am used to Windows and that is pretty much it. I can't even copy and paste photos on a Mac because the GUI is so different. I need a Windows GUI, which is why I got a B- in my intro computer class last year because half the semester was about using command line and I can't deal with command lines because I forget the commands. I had to write them on a piece of paper and that kind of defeats the purpose of even using a computer at all. And what is funny is that sometimes I would misspell something and then not notice I misspelled it and ask the teacher for help and look like a complete idiot in the class. And I am a guy who put together 2 gaming computers with the OS on SSDs and on one of the computers I crossfired 7870s. So that being said, I just want Steam OS because I like Big Picture mode and I will be using Big Picture mode for most of my stuff, and I would like them to add Hulu and Netflix to it because that would be a nice addition to the whole deal. So far, there is no built in controller navigation option that I could find on any version of Linux.
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Zen
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post #18 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thready View Post

So far, there is no built in controller navigation option that I could find on any version of Linux.

Trying to explain it isn't going to do you or us any good it seems. The best I can tell you is to try it. It works. PS1-PS4 and XBOX-XB1 all work, along with a plethora of regular computer game pads.
post #19 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thready View Post

Are people seriously arguing over a little post I made about Steam OS?
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post #20 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan9 View Post

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applaud.gif I think we might even argue here in the Linux forum more than they do in the AMD forums.
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