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[WashingtonPost] California bar bans Google Glass, fears recording - Page 4

post #31 of 182
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Originally Posted by Shiftstealth View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by phill1978 View Post

are you for real?

doh.gif

so... your in a bar (fyi im old enough to be able to drink in them so have experience) and its quite a large bar / pub, your saying everyone in that bar has a right to hear your conversation even if its between two closed people sat at a table.. not only that but broadcast to the entire world

your literally insane if you think that’s ok kookoo.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bridden View Post

There are laws specifically to protect people from this sort of thing. If a bar decided to ban a device from being used in their establishment, it is the owners RIGHT to do so. If you invited a man into your house, and he decided to start smoking, you have the right to ask him to put it out or leave. Sure, it isn't illegal to smoke inside of a private establishment, but the owner can decide that it is unwelcome if he chooses.

9/10, would drink at this bar

While i understand these arguments you have to understand how some people would use the product. Having lost my dad a month ago having some records would hold an immense amount more value to me. Example last feburary my brother announced his wife was pregnant and we were all out to dinner at an olive garden. If i had a google glass there, sitting at our table recording it would hold an immense amount of value, and i wouldn't have been recording anyone else on purpose. If i even had someone else's voice on the recording i wouldn't care.

All of your thoughts are malicious. You think people will be using it to spy on people on purpose. Sure some people will use it maliciously, just like people drive aggressively. Things are misused its pretty much a fact of life. I don't see how this misuse is any different than the misuse, and should be treated differently. I mean if someone is recording you i'm sure you would be able to tell. In a bar that loud you'd have to be very close to hear anything, And if you do something embarrassing it's equally embarrassing if you do it in public regardless. A google glass doesn't have enough space on it to walk around, and record just to catch funny moments. It would need to have meaning to record as it doesn't have space for 24/7 recording.

You miss my point, I am not arguing that people would use these in a malicious way, I am merely saying that in an establishment that is owned by an individual (or individuals) they have the right to allow or disallow specific things while on premises. Once again, cigarette smokers for example, they do not intentionally offend other people, and more than likely don't even think about the fact that others may not like it. Same with glasses. I know most people wont use them in bad ways, but some do find it uncomfortable being recorded, for one reason or another. If the owner of this establishment sees that this is happening, it is fully within his power to ask the offender to either A) put away the glasses or B) leave.

This is about being considerate of other people. There is no LAW requiring bars to implement this, which is good. I do believe that the owner should have the right so say if they can or can't. If the patrons have an issue with the decision the owner made, they can voice their concern (hopefully in a respectful, private manner) or find another establishment to receive service.

I do understand your point tho, but I think it should be left to the owner of the establishment, not capitol hill to tell the owner.
post #32 of 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bridden View Post

You miss my point, I am not arguing that people would use these in a malicious way, I am merely saying that in an establishment that is owned by an individual (or individuals) they have the right to allow or disallow specific things while on premises. Once again, cigarette smokers for example, they do not intentionally offend other people, and more than likely don't even think about the fact that others may not like it. Same with glasses. I know most people wont use them in bad ways, but some do find it uncomfortable being recorded, for one reason or another. If the owner of this establishment sees that this is happening, it is fully within his power to ask the offender to either A) put away the glasses or B) leave.

This is about being considerate of other people. There is no LAW requiring bars to implement this, which is good. I do believe that the owner should have the right so say if they can or can't. If the patrons have an issue with the decision the owner made, they can voice their concern (hopefully in a respectful, private manner) or find another establishment to receive service.

I do understand your point tho, but I think it should be left to the owner of the establishment, not capitol hill to tell the owner.

I agree with you, people have a right if they own the property, however i mean i would like to be able to use it in places like the Zoo with my nephew etc. I think that is reasonable.
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post #33 of 182
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Originally Posted by Guswut View Post

I sure hope not, as that'd not only be a massive waste of taxpayer money and time, it'd also be an absurd attempt to cripple something that is one of the better paths forward for future technological gadgets.

If private business owners want to restrict themselves, they're free to refuse service (at least until someone decides to try and declare it discrimination, but that's a whole new can of worms on the other end of the stick, as it were).

Whenever any conceptually new piece of technology starts to become popular, you end up with functional luddites who try and resist change. We've seen it with pagers, cell phones, bluetooth headsets, tablets, and pretty much everything that is "different".

Wearable technology is here to stay, and trying to fight against that is absurd. Too bad it seems that absurdity is a pattern, it seems.

The issue I see is that along with new technology comes the responsibility to use it wisely. It takes years for the acceptable use of technology to catch up to the technology. New technology isn't always a good thing.

Just this last weekend there was a memorial for the person that used to own the house I live in. Several members of his family walked our neighborhood to see how it has changed since they moved out (over 30 years ago). When they got to my back gate, I invited them to see how my house has changed since they last saw the property. One of the guys was wearing the google glass and I asked if it was turned on. He said yes and I asked him to turn it off. He got upset and said it was legal to record in public places and I "reminded" him that we live on a private street and he would need to get written permission from all of the home owners to record anything. He started to argue with me, and then realized he was wrong and turned it off.

This is only one example of people not knowing the "acceptable use" of this technology.

I love new technology, but find a lot of it mostly useless (for me anyway), however it is not up to me how it is used in society so long as my rights are respected. I certainly don't want to live in a world where everyone is walking around with constant recording technology on their face. If only certain individuals had access to that data I wouldn't be so bothered, but for it to be broadcast to the entire masses is where I start to have issues.

Read "Who Owns the Future" by Jaron Lanier for a good perspective on this and similar issues written by a man who has been deeply involved in the development of this technology. Some of the information in the book will scare you.
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post #34 of 182
I don't want everyone around me to turn in to the Paparazzi. Talking to someone with Google glass on is the same as them holding a cam-corder to my face while talking to me. It's unsettling and feels strange.
 
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post #35 of 182
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Originally Posted by airbozo View Post

Just this last weekend there was a memorial for the person that used to own the house I live in. Several members of his family walked our neighborhood to see how it has changed since they moved out (over 30 years ago). When they got to my back gate, I invited them to see how my house has changed since they last saw the property. One of the guys was wearing the google glass and I asked if it was turned on. He said yes and I asked him to turn it off. He got upset and said it was legal to record in public places and I "reminded" him that we live on a private street and he would need to get written permission from all of the home owners to record anything. He started to argue with me, and then realized he was wrong and turned it off.

This is only one example of people not knowing the "acceptable use" of this technology.

"This" technology could easily be replaced with pretty much anything that you did not want on your property. I assume you were polite, and the other person was initially upset.

That aside, would you ask the same thing to a person wearing a bluetooth headset (which can be used to record audio)? What about a person holding a cell phone (which could be used to record video)? Perhaps I'm not paranoid enough, but I don't see someone wearing a bluetooth headset, or holding a mobile phone, and think "Those devices can be used to record audio/video, therefore I should assume that they'll be recording audio/video whenever possible." I've yet to see someone wearing Google Glasses, but if I did, my first thought would be to talk to them about it and how they like it, not to ask them if they're recording me.
Quote:
Originally Posted by airbozo View Post

I love new technology, but find a lot of it mostly useless (for me anyway), however it is not up to me how it is used in society so long as my rights are respected. I certainly don't want to live in a world where everyone is walking around with constant recording technology on their face. If only certain individuals had access to that data I wouldn't be so bothered, but for it to be broadcast to the entire masses is where I start to have issues.

Pretty much everyone already has constant access to video and audio recording equipment. Why would moving it to the head/making it very minorly easier to use be such a red flag?

Personally, I cannot wait to live in a society that gives its users even more direct access to the vast stores of information, and the ability to create more information quicker and easier. I've been interested in Google Glasses and most heads-up wearables, and I'll likely end up getting one when they come down in price and one strikes my fancy as being the right device.

Good luck with trying to avoid the wearable technology future, but given the way these things work, you don't have that many more years before it becomes inescapable. Sorry, mate.
post #36 of 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by subyman View Post

I don't want everyone around me to turn in to the Paparazzi. Talking to someone with Google glass on is the same as them holding a cam-corder to my face while talking to me. It's unsettling and feels strange.

I don't think you're important enough for anyone to care about you, even with a cam corder to your face
post #37 of 182
Privacy is largely an illusion. Does a bar owner also have a right to say something like - Upon entering this establishment, you relinquish your rights to legally testify, or share with social media about anything you see or hear while on these premises? The law also recognizes a concept know as semi-private space, so none of this is as black and white as many of you are presenting it.

It's interesting to have this discussion now, because Google Glass is sorta of an awkward intermediate technology. In another few decades we might have computers within us with a direct connection to our brain.
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post #38 of 182
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Originally Posted by Stealth Pyros View Post

Meh. This whole thing is absolutely stupid. Trying to fight or "ban" Glass is only going to encourage someone to make a new alternative that is incredibly sleek and stealthy, to the point that you can't even tell it's a smart device.

This is exactly what is going to happen, soon you wont be able to tell the difference between google glass or sunglasses.
post #39 of 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guswut View Post

"This" technology could easily be replaced with pretty much anything that you did not want on your property. I assume you were polite, and the other person was initially upset.

That aside, would you ask the same thing to a person wearing a bluetooth headset (which can be used to record audio)? What about a person holding a cell phone (which could be used to record video)? Perhaps I'm not paranoid enough, but I don't see someone wearing a bluetooth headset, or holding a mobile phone, and think "Those devices can be used to record audio/video, therefore I should assume that they'll be recording audio/video whenever possible." I've yet to see someone wearing Google Glasses, but if I did, my first thought would be to talk to them about it and how they like it, not to ask them if they're recording me.
Pretty much everyone already has constant access to video and audio recording equipment. Why would moving it to the head/making it very minorly easier to use be such a red flag?

Personally, I cannot wait to live in a society that gives its users even more direct access to the vast stores of information, and the ability to create more information quicker and easier. I've been interested in Google Glasses and most heads-up wearables, and I'll likely end up getting one when they come down in price and one strikes my fancy as being the right device.

Good luck with trying to avoid the wearable technology future, but given the way these things work, you don't have that many more years before it becomes inescapable. Sorry, mate.

Of course I was polite. No need to be rude since politeness works way better in almost every circumstance. If I felt that a person wearing a headset or using a cell phone was recording me, yes I would say something. My point is, that a "responsible" person would not be recording someone without their permission in the first place.

One of the differences between the traditional recording gear and the wearable technology is the size and ease of which they work. With the traditional technology, it is usually (but not always) apparent that someone is recording.

While I too enjoy the ease of access to information, I should have the ability NOT to have all of my information accessible by anyone in the world (including my private life), unless I choose to have it available or select who has access. This again goes back to responsible use.

I am not trying to avoid wearable technology, hell I've been involved in several of these projects (some military and some public). I just feel that there should be acceptable use of the technology. Google feels the same way and that is why they have published the guidelines for Google Glass use. I'm not saying it should be banned (or even regulated by the government), just that people should understand when and where these types of gadgets should be used. Similar to talking on cell phones in the movie theater.
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post #40 of 182
Just need to point out. In California you have to have consent of all parties to record any conversation. CA Codes Pen:631.

So the bar has to ban all recording devices to be with in the lines of the law. Failure to ban the device could make them party in all legal fallout. Including prison time.

As for the under lying question. Google needs to make a device that will disable the camera for sale. I don't and never will consent to a recording of my person or place of residence for any reasons. Period.
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