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Decent linux encrypted folder lockers for cloud use? - Page 2

post #11 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by phill1978 View Post

yes and no. the 2nd zip only took a matter of seconds its really no hardship to unzip one and then another, but yes its overkill. it was just experimentation, i will most likely just run with one lock.
Fair enough. smile.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by phill1978 View Post

are personal files important? even just family photo's of loved ones.. put it this way, even though they are probably dull as ditch water would you want some random from any country in the world pouring over photos of your wife, nephew or niece ? you might, i dont.. but i do want offsite backups in case of fire , flood etc..
You misunderstand me. What I was asking was what the security risks are if someone did decrypt the files. If it was confidential financial information, then I could understand the extra level of paranoia because there's a genuine risk attached to such information getting leaked. However if someone was to spend their time decrypting family photos, the only side effect to that would be the time and electricity cost of the number crunchers used to crack your encryption. Really all the encryption serves for family photos is a privacy measure rather than a security measure (and I'm not trying to trivialise the importance of privacy either as I do completely agree with you - which is why I don't ever use public clouds either - I'm just trying to put some perspective on the level of encryption required for the job).
post #12 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by phill1978 View Post

.. privacy is fairly dead as a concept.

And security is an illusion.

You aren't going to stop anyone from accessing your data, you can slow them down ( sometimes ), but if they really want it they will get it. Period. But as I said, most crackers don't give 2 cents about your photo's / non-sensitive information and won't even touch them 9 times out of 10. Your estimate of "30 years to brute force" is at best, if they've exhausted every possible combination of passwords in their rainbow table and didn't get it on the first try. It's also only accounting for a single thread working on it at once, when anyone really trying to gain access to a file at such a level will be using a cluster of some sort all working either together or separately at different stop points. Which is going to severely reduce your estimated time frame.

Again, this is all unlikely as no cracker in their right mind is going to hack a singular account without having an idea of who you are and whats on the box. The paranoia is not worth the time in my opinion.

If you're worried about the government snooping on you, then you're SOL. If you hadn't heard the government has been working on cracking encryption ( if not successful, we may not know until another leak ), and is building a facility just for that task.

The only safe file, is an offline / cold stored file. And even that has its downsides.
Edited by Shrak - 3/10/14 at 3:08pm
post #13 of 32
It's doubtful any government could crack AES (well, maybe lower bit AES keys), but I think the NSA have contributed code to other cyphers so who knows just how secure they are.
post #14 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrak View Post

And security is an illusion.

You aren't going to stop anyone from accessing your data, you can slow them down ( sometimes ), but if they really want it they will get it. Period. But as I said, most crackers don't give 2 cents about your photo's / non-sensitive information and won't even touch them 9 times out of 10. Your estimate of "30 years to brute force" is at best, if they've exhausted every possible combination of passwords in their rainbow table and didn't get it on the first try. It's also only accounting for a single thread working on it at once, when anyone really trying to gain access to a file at such a level will be using a cluster of some sort all working either together or separately at different stop points. Which is going to severely reduce your estimated time frame.

Again, this is all unlikely as no cracker in their right mind is going to hack a singular account without having an idea of who you are and whats on the box. The paranoia is not worth the time in my opinion.

If you're worried about the government snooping on you, then you're SOL. If you hadn't heard the government has been working on cracking encryption ( if not successful, we may not know until another leak ), and is building a facility just for that task.

The only safe file, is an offline / cold stored file. And even that has its downsides.

but for the same time it takes me to zip a file with z7 which is what i do anyway with uploads the only step difference is changing a parameter to encrypt, it takes half a second and i haven't noticed much delay in the actual ziping of the file. So, id say you do what you want to do.. live in a cave and have everything in non combustible boxes... or perhaps go in reverse and just put everything you have on the cloud in plain format with a public share, but for me the half a second is worth peace of mind that a casual wont bother if its not easy to get at.

im not sure what your trying to argue with here other than being your typical argumentative self? we get it, you know everything i did ask for programs not preaching rolleyes.gif
Edited by Pip Boy - 3/10/14 at 3:35pm
post #15 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan9 View Post

Fair enough. smile.gif
You misunderstand me. What I was asking was what the security risks are if someone did decrypt the files. If it was confidential financial information, then I could understand the extra level of paranoia because there's a genuine risk attached to such information getting leaked. However if someone was to spend their time decrypting family photos, the only side effect to that would be the time and electricity cost of the number crunchers used to crack your encryption. Really all the encryption serves for family photos is a privacy measure rather than a security measure (and I'm not trying to trivialise the importance of privacy either as I do completely agree with you - which is why I don't ever use public clouds either - I'm just trying to put some perspective on the level of encryption required for the job).

Exactly, that's all im looking for. Its such a trivial button click and the files are smaller too so why not? I have photo's of people im not going to ask each one if they mind me putting photos of them online so its a courtesy thing too.
Quote:
and I'm not trying to trivialise the importance of privacy either as I do completely agree with you - which is why I don't ever use public clouds either - I'm just trying to put some perspective on the level of encryption required for the job).

this is the dilema, i really dont like the cloud either. I don't know how old you are or if you have family and memories,photos, videos etc.. perhaps you haven't. but in the unlikely but entirely possible scenario of fire,flood,theft or some other event that totalled your local backups too, would you be comfortable having lost forever those images and videos? I mean, sure who knows now but if your in your retirement wouldn't it be nice to have that one photo of a lost loved one or a video of your first childs steps? its not essential perhaps.. but it seems extremely trivial to upload a small amount of data and lock it up for safe keeping?

in the end a local backup in an garage or store not attached to the main building might be a good solution but until i get that perfect place to locally segregate my machines from each other the cloud is a backup..
Edited by Pip Boy - 3/10/14 at 3:34pm
post #16 of 32
oh i have off site backups, but those are servers I manage in a data centre. So it's essentially a private cloud.

It's also not free, but I would be renting those boxes regardless of the memories I want backed up anyway.
post #17 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan9 View Post

oh i have off site backups, but those are servers I manage in a data centre. So it's essentially a private cloud.

It's also not free, but I would be renting those boxes regardless of the memories I want backed up anyway.

sadly i don't have that luxury, so for me it is a reputable cloud company's free quota for now.. but again its for privacy not security, i don't have security laden files anywhere really, that junk is all in my head.. its the benefit of having a really good long term memory smile.gif



edit

I think this
http://www.overclock.net/t/1473102/techspot-sony-and-panasonic-unveil-300-gb-archival-discs-for-long-term-storage#post_21926481

plus a nice waterproof/fireproof safe in an out building would be better than the cloud ultimately.
Edited by Pip Boy - 3/10/14 at 3:49pm
post #18 of 32
I use EncFS with my 1mb entropy chunk between the MBR and first partition of my flash drive as my key. That is sufficient, the files could potentially be harmful if they got into the wrong hands but the folder isn't public so they'd need the name of the folder - to know I was using EncFS, and then hash out the exact 1mb key. Not likely in my lifetime or theirs so I'm not too worried about it.
    
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post #19 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xaero252 View Post

I use EncFS with my 1mb entropy chunk between the MBR and first partition of my flash drive as my key. That is sufficient, the files could potentially be harmful if they got into the wrong hands but the folder isn't public so they'd need the name of the folder - to know I was using EncFS, and then hash out the exact 1mb key. Not likely in my lifetime or theirs so I'm not too worried about it.

That's not on cloud storage though?
post #20 of 32
It is indeed on cloud storage - I can detail the process if you'd like. EncFS is a pseudo filesystem that is to say that it looks like a new mount but the data is just piped through the encryption and stored as regular files. For example; resume.odt would become [64 characters of random origin - generally foreign langauges].Enc a user who views the folder normally will just see these randomly named encrypted files. A person who mounts the folder with EncFS will see the original files. This works well for cloud storage as you don't have to encrypt all of the files every time a single change is made. This keeps the amount of uploading down. If you use a single compressed file or a filesystem image - any time one file is changed the whole lot has to be uploaded again. My system works well because I keep that particular flash drive on my keyring and so if I need to access the share I only have to take it out of my pocket.
    
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