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Advice for adding fans - Page 2

post #11 of 23
Can you remove to front SSD cage? Removing it would clear a lot more airflow from to top front fan.
Also you might want to replace thermal paste from your GPU cooler, i used to have asus dc2 cooler on my gtx 560 and after long term use, the paste was really really dried up.
Also changing the fans to better quality ones would help, something like noiseblockers, gentle typhoons, noctuas or be quiet!s
post #12 of 23
Thread Starter 
Price isn't really a problem for the fans, i regret the purchase of my current fans(they were cheap and starting to get really noisy after a year of use). So i don't have a problem with paying a bit more for a quality fan. Might go with GPU PWM header option.

You sure their shouldn't be an exhaust at all?
In that case i move the exhaust to top intake

@epikk
The mid SSD cages have been removed already(old pic), the new fans are going to be Noctua's, if i like them i might swap the others to. Change the paste is on my list to
Edited by mark96 - 3/12/14 at 4:41am
post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark96 View Post

Price isn't really a problem for the fans, i regret the purchase of my current fans(they were cheap and starting to get really noisy after a year of use). So i don't have a problem with paying a bit more for a quality fan. Might go with GPU PWM header option.
It's explained in link below. Be careful you have the right GPU fan connector and of course use PSU powered splitter for case fans.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark96 View Post

You sure their shouldn't be an exhaust at all?
In that case i move the exhaust to top intake
No, I'm not sure. But it's an easy test to try and see which way components run cooler... and as cheap as can be. wink.gif
Edited by doyll - 3/12/14 at 6:29am
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark96 View Post

You sure their shouldn't be an exhaust at all?
In that case i move the exhaust to top intake

There should be exhaust obviously. You want to create a sort of an wind tunnel in your case.
What i would do is one fan in the bottom, one in the front (unrestricted top) and one in back exhaust. That set up would bring a lot of airflow for the GPU and create positive pressure with the least amount of fans possible. If you use high quality fans that set up will be very very quiet and powerful
post #15 of 23
The exhaust is flowing out of case because of intake fans. As long as the intake fans have reasonable specs they will push the air out vents and other openings in the case. This is why many of us remove the PCI-E slot covers from back of case.

No, we do not want a wind tunnel. A wind tunnel is uncontrolled air blowing through. We want to control the airflow so the heated component exhaust to leave tthe case without mixing with the cool intake air going to components

Edit:

Lots of air blowing around does not mean we have cool air flowing to components. tongue.gif
post #16 of 23
I don't think that's entirely true, i haven't done extensive testing in my case with massive positive air pressure (all intakes), but i've heard of people having far worse temps with a huge positive pressure compared to the sort of "wind tunnel" type of setup what i recommended. With bottom and front intake and exhaust in the back, cool and hot air mixing shouldn't be a problem

Ofc you find the very best results by testing. I would do what i suggested, run some benchmarks and check temps, then turn the back fan around and run some benchmarks again.
post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by EPiiKK View Post

I don't think that's entirely true, i haven't done extensive testing in my case with massive positive air pressure (all intakes), but i've heard of people having far worse temps with a huge positive pressure compared to the sort of "wind tunnel" type of setup what i recommended. With bottom and front intake and exhaust in the back, cool and hot air mixing shouldn't be a problem

Ofc you find the very best results by testing. I would do what i suggested, run some benchmarks and check temps, then turn the back fan around and run some benchmarks again.
I will say it again:

We do not want a wind tunnel. A wind tunnel is uncontrolled air blowing through the tunnel / case. We want to control the airflow by flowing the heated component exhaust out of the case without it mixing with the cool intake air going to components

This has to be done without having huge positive pressure. We want a nice quiet flow of cool air to components and their heated air to quietly leave the case without mixing with the cool intake air. It's all about guiding the air where we want it to go, not about making a wind tunnel.

My sig rig has no exhaust fans with 3x TY-140/147 intakes, PCI slot covers removed and back grill removed, and no exhaust fans. Case fans idle at 750rpm and full load 1100rpm. Air temperature inside of case are never more than 2-3c max above ambient. CPU at 97-100% for extended periods is always below 50c, usually 23-47c. GPU never goes above 55-60c, usually 30-44c.
post #18 of 23
Thread Starter 
Just purchased 2 Noctua's to start with, will make the modifications tomorrow and report the results.
Thanks for the help already
post #19 of 23
Very interested in how low your temps end up being. biggrin.gif
post #20 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by doyll View Post

I will say it again:

We do not want a wind tunnel. A wind tunnel is uncontrolled air blowing through the tunnel / case. We want to control the airflow by flowing the heated component exhaust out of the case without it mixing with the cool intake air going to components

This has to be done without having huge positive pressure. We want a nice quiet flow of cool air to components and their heated air to quietly leave the case without mixing with the cool intake air. It's all about guiding the air where we want it to go, not about making a wind tunnel.

My sig rig has no exhaust fans with 3x TY-140/147 intakes, PCI slot covers removed and back grill removed, and no exhaust fans. Case fans idle at 750rpm and full load 1100rpm. Air temperature inside of case are never more than 2-3c max above ambient. CPU at 97-100% for extended periods is always below 50c, usually 23-47c. GPU never goes above 55-60c, usually 30-44c.

that's interesting, as i said i haven't done extensive testing so my knowledge might not be the most trustworthy. Have you tried having one exhaust?
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