Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Hard Drives & Storage › What is PATA?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What is PATA?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Is PATA just a form of IDE that is usually compatible with IDE connections, or is it a specific type of IDE that needs PATA support? If I have a PATA drive, will it work with any external drive adapter or hdd dock that says IDE, or do I need something that specifically says "PATA"? confusedsmiley.png
Edited by Drahadis - 3/19/14 at 7:06pm
post #2 of 19
My understanding is that PATA and IDE are basically the same thing, they just started calling it PATA when SATA was introduced.

I know this isn't the best source, but it should give you the general idea. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parallel_ATA
Scrapwork Rig 3.0
(30 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7-6800k (6-Core) @ 4ghz EVGA X99A FTW K ASUS ROG Strix GTX 1070 G.Skill Ripjaws V Series DDR4 3200 (32gb Total,... 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
250gb Samsung 960 Evo NVMe SSD (Boot Drive) 256gb Samsung 830 Series SSD (Games) Hitachi Ultrastar 7K3000 2TB (Games) Western Digital Blue 1TB (Storage) 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Seagate 160gb (Music) Asus DVD-RW Corsair H80i Windows 10 Pro (Microsoft Insider Program) 
OSMonitorMonitorMonitor
Windows 7 Ultimate 27" Yamakasi Catleap 2703 (1440p IPS - Main Dis... 24" Asus VS248H-P (1080p LCD - Secondary Display) 23.6" Asus VS247H-P (1080p LCD - Secondary Disp... 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
22" Vizio M220VA TV (1080p LED TV / Secondary D... G.Skill RIPJAWS KM780 (Cherry MX Browns) Corsair RM850 Corsair Vengeance C70 Military Green 
MouseMouse PadAudioAudio
Logitech G502 Proteus Core Rocketfish Dual-sided Anodized Aluminum Mouse Mat Creative Sound Blaster X-Fi Titanium AKG K553 Pro Reference Class Headphones 
AudioAudioAudioAudio
Harman/Kardon HK395 2.1 Speakers (For TV) Marantz Pro MPM-1000 Cardoid Condensor Mic Logitech G35 7.1 Surround Headset (Backup) Innogear IG101 Phantom Power Supply 
OtherOther
VIVO Vertical Dual Monitor Mount Tonor Scissor Arm Microphone Boom 
  hide details  
Reply
Scrapwork Rig 3.0
(30 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7-6800k (6-Core) @ 4ghz EVGA X99A FTW K ASUS ROG Strix GTX 1070 G.Skill Ripjaws V Series DDR4 3200 (32gb Total,... 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
250gb Samsung 960 Evo NVMe SSD (Boot Drive) 256gb Samsung 830 Series SSD (Games) Hitachi Ultrastar 7K3000 2TB (Games) Western Digital Blue 1TB (Storage) 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Seagate 160gb (Music) Asus DVD-RW Corsair H80i Windows 10 Pro (Microsoft Insider Program) 
OSMonitorMonitorMonitor
Windows 7 Ultimate 27" Yamakasi Catleap 2703 (1440p IPS - Main Dis... 24" Asus VS248H-P (1080p LCD - Secondary Display) 23.6" Asus VS247H-P (1080p LCD - Secondary Disp... 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
22" Vizio M220VA TV (1080p LED TV / Secondary D... G.Skill RIPJAWS KM780 (Cherry MX Browns) Corsair RM850 Corsair Vengeance C70 Military Green 
MouseMouse PadAudioAudio
Logitech G502 Proteus Core Rocketfish Dual-sided Anodized Aluminum Mouse Mat Creative Sound Blaster X-Fi Titanium AKG K553 Pro Reference Class Headphones 
AudioAudioAudioAudio
Harman/Kardon HK395 2.1 Speakers (For TV) Marantz Pro MPM-1000 Cardoid Condensor Mic Logitech G35 7.1 Surround Headset (Backup) Innogear IG101 Phantom Power Supply 
OtherOther
VIVO Vertical Dual Monitor Mount Tonor Scissor Arm Microphone Boom 
  hide details  
Reply
post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks, glad someone responded. I'm just trying to better understand this. The way products are being advertised for what they're compatible with is confusing. Very few docking station specs mention "PATA", the rest all just mention or are labeled as "IDE".
post #4 of 19
In the olden days, most PC hard drives handled the bits recorded on the disks the way non-USB floppy drives do, meaning the drive electronics did little but pass the raw bits through, after amplifying and cleaning up what's picked up by the heads. Those drives didn't know or care what those pulses represented because that was the job of a separate controller card. But the timing of the bits was distorted as they traveled through the cable, and as data rates increase, this made it harder to accurately decode the bits,. So a group of computer and drive companies came up with a cheap solution to this problem, by putting the controller on the drive; in other words, the drive would have Integrated Device Electronics, or IDE. That also allowed faster data transmission because now the raw bits only had to travel 1" - 2", rather than up to 10 feet, as the old standard required. Another name for IDE is Advanced Technology Attachment, or ATA, and at the time it was invented, the cheapest and fastest interface was parallel TTL, so it was Parallel-ATA. A rudimentary I/O port could now be used in place of an elaborate analog/digital controller card, and the port could be made from just 4-5 generic chips that had been in production since the 1970s. But eventually data rates became too fast for PATA, so Serial-ATA was introduced because by then serial transmission could be done faster than parallel.
post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by larymoencurly View Post

In the olden days, most PC hard drives handled the bits recorded on the disks the way non-USB floppy drives do, meaning the drive electronics did little but pass the raw bits through, after amplifying and cleaning up what's picked up by the heads. Those drives didn't know or care what those pulses represented because that was the job of a separate controller card. But the timing of the bits was distorted as they traveled through the cable, and as data rates increase, this made it harder to accurately decode the bits,. So a group of computer and drive companies came up with a cheap solution to this problem, by putting the controller on the drive; in other words, the drive would have Integrated Device Electronics, or IDE. That also allowed faster data transmission because now the raw bits only had to travel 1" - 2", rather than up to 10 feet, as the old standard required. Another name for IDE is Advanced Technology Attachment, or ATA, and at the time it was invented, the cheapest and fastest interface was parallel TTL, so it was Parallel-ATA. A rudimentary I/O port could now be used in place of an elaborate analog/digital controller card, and the port could be made from just 4-5 generic chips that had been in production since the 1970s. But eventually data rates became too fast for PATA, so Serial-ATA was introduced because by then serial transmission could be done faster than parallel.

Good stuff, but does that mean PATA is usually compatible with most sockets labeled as "IDE"? That's the answer I'm really after. Do you know? This is in the context of HDD docking stations, not motherboards.
Edited by Drahadis - 3/20/14 at 9:21pm
post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by larymoencurly View Post

Another name for IDE is Advanced Technology Attachment, or ATA, and at the time it was invented, the cheapest and fastest interface was parallel TTL, so it was Parallel-ATA.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drahadis View Post

does that mean PATA is usually compatible with most sockets labeled as "IDE"? That's the answer I'm really after. Do you know?
Another name for IDE is Advanced Technology Attachment, or ATA., and at the time it was invented, the cheapest and fastest interface was parallel TTL, so it was Parallel-ATA, or PATA.

You may have a problem with PATA drives that aren't CAM (Common Access Method) compatible, in case you collect antique hard drives from the early-mid 1990s. biggrin.gif
post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 
I just want to know if IDE docking stations normally support PATA.

I don't have a problem with any hardware. I just need to transfer data from an old storage PATA HDD, but my current mobo doesn't have an IDE socket on it. I'm looking at HDD docking stations and its confusing because the Startech UNIDOCK2U is one of the few docking stations I can find that says PATA in the stats. The only other ones don't seem to be very good at all (from all the customer complaints).
Edited by Drahadis - 3/21/14 at 8:43pm
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drahadis View Post

I just want to know if IDE docking stations normally support PATA.

I don't have a problem with any hardware. I just need to transfer data from an old storage PATA HDD, but my current mobo doesn't have an IDE socket on it. I'm looking at HDD docking stations and its confusing because the Startech UNIDOCK2U is one of the few docking stations I can find that says PATA in the stats. The only other ones don't seem to be very good at all (from all the customer complaints).
Any time a drive docking station is advertised as IDE, that means it supports PATA because everybody uses the term "IDE" wrong that way.

I don't know how good that Startech docking station is, but it seems to have almost the same AC power adapter as my older Bytecc USB 3.0 enclosure, which was a piece of junk that was not UL safety approved and failed in less than 2 years. When I pried it open, I found it contained a lot fewer parts than the AC adapter used by Western Digital, and it had no protection against sending excessive voltage to the disk drive. I would have expected something better from that $45 Startech.

For less than half the price you could get a USB-PATA drive enclosure:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817182153

I believe all Rosewill enclosures include UL approved AC adapters.

The cheapest way I know of to use a PATA drive with a SATA-only motherboard is with one of these $5 adapters:

http://www.meritline.com/ide-to-sata-or-sata-to-ide-adapter---p-36542.aspx

That one works with every kind of disk drive -- SATA, PATA, hard, optical -- but you have to be careful and use the correct SATA connector (one is for drives, the other for the controller, and they're not marked clearly) and not plug the PATA socket in the wrong way (plastic body is undersized).

Next cheapest is a PCI-E card that adds a PATA port:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/2-Port-SATA-II-2-0-RAID-1-IDE-3-5-to-PCI-E-PCI-Express-Adapter-Converter-Card-/171195322255?pt=US_Drive_Cables_dapters&hash=item27dc094f8f
post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 
You seem to be guiding me away from docking stations completely. Is there a reason for that? Are all of them cheap dangerous products? I have a pile of old hard drives I'd like to go through. They could be corrupt or have bad sectors, or be bad in any way that would screw up window's ability to connect with them inside the system. That's why I wanted to use a USB docking station. Not to mention I won't have to take apart a external enclosure every time I try a different drive. Are you sure there aren't any good HDD docking stations? I'm just trying to be practical. I'm not trying to shoot down your ideas because I'm hard to please... I'm just looking for a way to backup the storage drive from my old system, and go through a pile of old hard drives from a few other older systems without it turning into a hassle. Of course I do definitely want to use a safe product, so if there are no HDD docking stations that are safe, then I guess an external drive enclosure is probably the best option. frown.gif
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drahadis View Post

You seem to be guiding me away from docking stations completely. Is there a reason for that? Are all of them cheap dangerous products? I have a pile of old hard drives I'd like to go through. They could be corrupt or have bad sectors, or be bad in any way that would screw up window's ability to connect with them inside the system. That's why I wanted to use a USB docking station. Not to mention I won't have to take apart a external enclosure every time I try a different drive. Are you sure there aren't any good HDD docking stations? I'm just trying to be practical. I'm not trying to shoot down your ideas because I'm hard to please... I'm just looking for a way to backup the storage drive from my old system, and go through a pile of old hard drives from a few other older systems without it turning into a hassle. Of course I do definitely want to use a safe product, so if there are no HDD docking stations that are safe, then I guess an external drive enclosure is probably the best option. frown.gif
Docking stations are no more dangerous than external drive enclosures, but both often include cheapo AC power adapters. Actually the uncertified AC adapters aren't that dangerous, but notice that every AC adapter included with a Seagate and WD external drive is UL approved. And because so many docking stations and drive enclosures use an adapter that puts out just 12VDC, you can probably use a UL approved AC adapter from something else, provided the polarity of the plug is correct.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Hard Drives & Storage
Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Hard Drives & Storage › What is PATA?