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Hacking Power Supply

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
Hello, I got my friends seasonic platinum 400w fanless PSU to power my led controller from the 12v and ground line. When I use the paper clip trick on the end of the motherboard cable, the voltages are 12.2v from the cpu/PCIE (im cutting the end connector and sticking the + and - into the led controller), which is perfect. However, since the psu is modular and I dont want a big motherboard cable sticking out, I shorted the appropriate pins on the pin in with a piece of wire, the PSU turns on, but the voltages drop really low and keep changing (or is that my multimeter? when i put it on DC v , even when the nodes arnt touching any thing, the voltage goes crazy and keeps changing, but when i put it to say a battery, it reads fine at 1.37 etc)

Edit: so the "keep changing" means that the PSU is still off which may be the piece im using to short the pins is not doing it's job.

im using this with the pin grabbing ends yanked out from defunct cables
photo_zpsb83e202c.jpg


what I guess Im asking is if i need to have the motherboard cable sticking in the PSU to short out the pins, or if i can short out the pins directly from the pin in. I appreciate any comments or concerns smile.gif
Edited by Always Up - 3/25/14 at 6:20pm
post #2 of 5
You need to connect pin-outs 3 & 5 (Ground & PS ON) together on the 10 pin socket and pin-outs 6 & 4 (both Ground) together on the 18 pin socket.
Black Noise
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Black Noise
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i7 990X Asus Rampage III Extreme EVGA 980Ti EVGA 980Ti 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
24GB Corsair Dominator GT PC3-16000 Samsung 850 EVO Crucial CT750MX300 Seagate Momentus 2TB 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingCooling
Seagate Momentus 2TB Sony Optiarc AD-7690H Slimline DVD-RW Blocks - EK Supremacy, 2 x EK FC-Titan X, EK FC... Radiators - 2 x Black Ice SR1 480, 2 x Black Ic... 
CoolingCoolingCoolingOS
Pumps - Swiftech 35X2 x 2 & Heatsinks Reservoir - EK Multioption X2 400 Advanced Fans - 20 x Noiseblocker PL2 Windows 7 Pro 64-bit 
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post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 
Thanks! however it didnt exactly work (maybe i have the pin orderings messed up)

post #4 of 5
That's a bit puzzling, those are all ground pin-outs.
Black Noise
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Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingCooling
Seagate Momentus 2TB Sony Optiarc AD-7690H Slimline DVD-RW Blocks - EK Supremacy, 2 x EK FC-Titan X, EK FC... Radiators - 2 x Black Ice SR1 480, 2 x Black Ic... 
CoolingCoolingCoolingOS
Pumps - Swiftech 35X2 x 2 & Heatsinks Reservoir - EK Multioption X2 400 Advanced Fans - 20 x Noiseblocker PL2 Windows 7 Pro 64-bit 
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Black Noise
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RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
24GB Corsair Dominator GT PC3-16000 Samsung 850 EVO Crucial CT750MX300 Seagate Momentus 2TB 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingCooling
Seagate Momentus 2TB Sony Optiarc AD-7690H Slimline DVD-RW Blocks - EK Supremacy, 2 x EK FC-Titan X, EK FC... Radiators - 2 x Black Ice SR1 480, 2 x Black Ic... 
CoolingCoolingCoolingOS
Pumps - Swiftech 35X2 x 2 & Heatsinks Reservoir - EK Multioption X2 400 Advanced Fans - 20 x Noiseblocker PL2 Windows 7 Pro 64-bit 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
NEC MultiSync LCD2690WUXi Enermax Aurora Seasonic Platinum 1000 Case Labs TH10 & Pedestal 
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post #5 of 5
If you want to play it safe, don't make a direct short with those two leads but instead use a resistor rated for approximately 200-300 ohms. 500 ohms may also work. That way if you connect the wrong pins together, you're much, much less likely to do any damage.

Exactly how are you measuring the voltage with your meter? Where are the meter leads plugged into the meter? Because big voltage variations like that indicate you're creating a short, which can't happen unless you have the meter set to measure resistance (you do not) or have a lead plugged into the milliamp (mA) or amp (A) socket instead of the DC volts/ohms socket (V Ω or DCV).
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