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Classy controller: high PWM for daily gaming dangerous?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I don't know much about the PWM frequency slider in the classy controller, aside from that it might help with OC headroom. I've been told by overclockers that they just crank it to the max (571Khz) for benching. I've been cranking it to 571Khz (with 1.4 volts) for daily gaming sessions. Temps are of no concern here, watercooled and always below 50C. But I just don't feel 100% comfortable with it. Is there any risk of degradation with this super-high PWM?
post #2 of 7
    I think I know what this is for, but just in case, can you show me a screenshot, and explain to me (if possible) what that setting affects?  I'm guessing it adjusts the PWM frequency for the fan; I just want to make sure before I give an explanation. smile.gif
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post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Techie007 View Post

    I think I know what this is for, but just in case, can you show me a screenshot, and explain to me (if possible) what that setting affects?  I'm guessing it adjusts the PWM frequency for the fan; I just want to make sure before I give an explanation. smile.gif

I'm responding from my phone so I can't post a screenie right now but it's the bottom slider in the GTX Classified Controller. Ranges from 260khz to 571khz. I believe it affects the power delivery to the core an makes the power more "stable" but does increase temps a little. Fans are controlled seperately.
post #4 of 7
    Ah, with that range and description, I know exactly what it does now.  That is the switching frequency used by the bucking converter that converts the 5 or 12v from the PCI-E port to the ~1.4v that the GPU needs.  Normally, such a frequency wouldn't be adjustable, but would be hard-wired to match the resonant frequency of the inductor for maximum power conversion efficiency.

    The higher the frequency, the greater the switching losses in the switching device (Transistor, Mosfet, or IGBT), which will increase its temperature.  As long as that device isn't getting too hot as a result, the higher switching frequency won't affect the life of your video card at all.  I am a little surprised that there would be any useful difference from increasing that frequency, since 260 kHz would still provide very fast regulation times.  I would recommend running it at the default, and only increase it if doing so allows the video card to run more stable.  It will not affect the performance of the GPU in any way, it will only affect how easily the GPU crashes when overclocked and worked hard.
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post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Techie007 View Post

    Ah, with that range and description, I know exactly what it does now.  That is the switching frequency used by the bucking converter that converts the 5 or 12v from the PCI-E port to the ~1.4v that the GPU needs.  Normally, such a frequency wouldn't be adjustable, but would be hard-wired to match the resonant frequency of the inductor for maximum power conversion efficiency.

    The higher the frequency, the greater the switching losses in the switching device (Transistor, Mosfet, or IGBT), which will increase its temperature.  As long as that device isn't getting too hot as a result, the higher switching frequency won't affect the life of your video card at all.  I am a little surprised that there would be any useful difference from increasing that frequency, since 260 kHz would still provide very fast regulation times.  I would recommend running it at the default, and only increase it if doing so allows the video card to run more stable.  It will not affect the performance of the GPU in any way, it will only affect how easily the GPU crashes when overclocked and worked hard.

Thanks for the explanation! +REP thumb.gif
post #6 of 7
I would not run @ 1.4v + that high PWM, if you go through the Classy thread you'll see the guys with DMM show that to be ~1.5v Me personally, I use the stock volts for gaming but do raise the PWM, it does help getting more out of the clocks.
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post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by error-id10t View Post

I would not run @ 1.4v + that high PWM, if you go through the Classy thread you'll see the guys with DMM show that to be ~1.5v Me personally, I use the stock volts for gaming but do raise the PWM, it does help getting more out of the clocks.

I've heard that, but is 1.5 volts by itself a problem if temps are good (under 50C)? Or does high voltage present its own problems?

Either way, I've dropped it to 1.375v and 400khz PWM which is enough 1306Mhz (could maybe get by with even less). Fast enough for me right now. Saves me 3-4C.
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