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Which 780 Ti should I get? Asus DirectCU II OC or EVGA SC with ACX cooler? - Page 4

post #31 of 46
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Please, confirm me one more thing. Does the Asus card have an option on the control panel to unlock voltages and go beyond the default 1.162V until 1.21V like EVGA? Can't find that info on the web...

@Two Cables

I'm not sure if I can agree with you on that faulty sensor position thing. I mean, Guru has high precision thermal imaging equipment and they take temperature readings from the VRM area which show near 100ºC temps, whereas other 780 Ti's are on the sub-90s mark. So, it's a fact that this card isn't as effective in cooling the VRM as others are.

I don't know what the temperature target is for the VRM in this card, but these high values certainly bother me.
Edited by Strider49 - 4/5/14 at 5:55pm
post #32 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Strider49 View Post

Please, confirm me one more thing. Does the Asus card have an option on the control panel to unlock voltages and go beyond the default 1.162V until 1.21V like EVGA? Can't find that info on the web...

@Two Cables

I'm not sure if I can agree with you on that faulty sensor position thing. I mean, Guru has high precision thermal imaging equipment and they take temperature readings from the VRM area which show near 100ºC temps, whereas other 780 Ti's are on the sub-90s mark. So, it's a fact that this card isn't as effective in cooling the VRM as others are.

I don't know what the temperature target is for the VRM in this card, but these high values certainly bother me.

 

Alright, I see that. They're measuring it from the back of the card using their thermal imaging equipment and this is what they said [source]:

 

Quote:
At M1 the VRM area can be spotted, it runs almost 100 Degrees C, this is a fairly high temperature. Make sure you have plenty airflow inside your chassis as that will definitely help.

 

I'm not getting the impression here that they're all that worried about it or anything like that. Yes, they did say that this is a "fairly high temperature" and that you should have plenty of airflow inside your case "because that will definitely help", but beyond that, I mean, I'm not seeing things like, "This is way too high" or whatever. Of course, that's at stock, but they did overclock it and had no problems. So, I can only imagine what this card will do with water cooling.

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post #33 of 46
Realistically speaking, when getting one of the highest end consumer grade cards on the market, the need for overclocking is, for the most part, non existent. When you use an HD 7870 like I do, an overclock can give you actual performance boosts that can be noticed. But there is no reason to overclock a 780ti. I know many people might argue with me but people who know about video cards would probably agree. At this point, however, when you are spending that kind of money, the best way to go would be to buy the card that will last the longest. I would get whatever card runs cooler. Overclocking CAN have a negative impact on hardware over time. If you spend $700 on a video card the best thing to do, for longevity, is to keep it at stock speeds with a nice cooler on it. But that's just my two cents. I am sure someone is going to give me some benchmark from some site showing me how I am wrong but if you spend your own money on this stuff, you want it to last. It is better to have the core clock stay at 875 MHz than to overclock it, mess with the voltages, and run the risk of something happening to it that the warranty won't cover because they do not cover a user overclocking the part.

And dude, it's a 780 ti. You could cut the power of the card in half and still be able to run many games at high settings.
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post #34 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thready View Post

Realistically speaking, when getting one of the highest end consumer grade cards on the market, the need for overclocking is, for the most part, non existent. When you use an HD 7870 like I do, an overclock can give you actual performance boosts that can be noticed. But there is no reason to overclock a 780ti.

Part of the reason for paying the premium for a top-of-the-line card is for the ability to play games at maximum settings without compromise. An individual who was comfortable with merely high settings might be better suited for a GTX 780 or R9 290/X rather than the 780 Ti, as those would be more cost-effective.

From firsthand experience, the GTX 780 Ti will still struggle pushing 60 FPS at 1440P with some titles (e.g. BF4 multiplayer) at stock settings. A 20%+ overclock is significant -- it is a make-or-break difference.

I'm a huge ASUS fan but it's difficult/impossible to argue with eVGA's support service. eVGA takes care of its customers with greater observed consistency than ASUS does.
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post #35 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by friend'scatdied View Post

Part of the reason for paying the premium for a top-of-the-line card is for the ability to play games at maximum settings without compromise. An individual who was comfortable with merely high settings might be better suited for a GTX 780 or R9 290/X rather than the 780 Ti, as those would be more cost-effective.

From firsthand experience, the GTX 780 Ti will still struggle pushing 60 FPS at 1440P with some titles (e.g. BF4 multiplayer) at stock settings. A 20%+ overclock is significant -- it is a make-or-break difference.

I'm a huge ASUS fan but it's difficult/impossible to argue with eVGA's support service. eVGA takes care of its customers with greater observed consistency than ASUS does.

Point taken, but it seems to me that changing the voltages on a $700 card is unwise. If you have the money then all the power to you, but it is just something that I could never feel comfortable with doing to a card that is a month's paycheck for me.
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post #36 of 46
Strider - I can help with a couple of your questions as I have the ASUS 780ti in its reference form (but not the DirectCU).

There is indeed a warranty sticker on one of the cooler screws. I tested the card in Valley on air to check I didn't have a lemon then took it off. I managed to get it off in fair shape but it is designed to flake away if tampered with.

Once I switched to the EK cooler and backplate, I flashed the BIOS with the voltage unlocked one on the nVidia 780ti thread here by skyn3t.

I am able to get a stable overclock of 1300 boost 7800 memory at 1.000 volts, 110% power target under water. The temperature hovers at 46C in Valley but less in real games.
Edited by DanielCoffey - 4/8/14 at 12:49pm
post #37 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thready View Post

Realistically speaking, when getting one of the highest end consumer grade cards on the market, the need for overclocking is, for the most part, non existent. When you use an HD 7870 like I do, an overclock can give you actual performance boosts that can be noticed. But there is no reason to overclock a 780ti. I know many people might argue with me but people who know about video cards would probably agree. At this point, however, when you are spending that kind of money, the best way to go would be to buy the card that will last the longest. I would get whatever card runs cooler. Overclocking CAN have a negative impact on hardware over time. If you spend $700 on a video card the best thing to do, for longevity, is to keep it at stock speeds with a nice cooler on it. But that's just my two cents. I am sure someone is going to give me some benchmark from some site showing me how I am wrong but if you spend your own money on this stuff, you want it to last. It is better to have the core clock stay at 875 MHz than to overclock it, mess with the voltages, and run the risk of something happening to it that the warranty won't cover because they do not cover a user overclocking the part.

And dude, it's a 780 ti. You could cut the power of the card in half and still be able to run many games at high settings.

I'm getting the 780 Ti primarily for two reasons: one is that I'll be upgrading to a 1440p @120Hz+ monitor (ASUS PG278Q) and need all that horsepower, and the other is longevity. I know I won't be needing to overclock this beast of a card for quite some time, but being able to do so safely when needed is certainly a plus in the long run. When I buy something, I don't look just at the immediate future, that's why I'm choosing between brands that offer a 3-year warranty in my country too. Also, it doesn't even imply voiding your warranty... and I'm not one of those guys trying to squeeze the maximum out of their cards just to show some numbers on the internet and be in the top places of the tables. I'm simply a gamer who wants to be able to do some nice OC when it's really needed and to tweak the voltages as much as it is permitted. wink.gif
And yes, I'm investing my hard earned money here, not my parents'.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanielCoffey View Post

Strider - I can help with a couple of your questions as I have the ASUS 780ti in its reference form (but not the DirectCU).

There is indeed a warranty sticker on one of the cooler screws. I tested the card in Valley on air to check I didn't have a lemon then took it off. I managed to get it off in fair shape but it is designed to flake away if tampered with.

Once I switched to the EK cooler and backplate, I flashed the BIOS with the voltage unlocked one on the nVidia 780ti thread here by skyn3t.

I am able to get a stable overclock of 1300 boost 7800 memory at 1.000 volts, 110% power target under water. The temperature hovers at 46C in Valley but less in real games.

Thanks for your feedback! thumb.gif Well, I really wanted to put the card under water in the future to hit those temps you are reporting and assist in the cooling of the GPU and hot VRMs, but that's not a good thing. I don't wanna mess things up and end up voiding the warranty.

On the other hand, a friend told me that I should not worry about those hot VRM temps reported by Guru (pretty much what you said in your last post, Two Cables), and that ASUS has an immaculate track record over the last few years regarding graphics cards coolers.

Btw, 1.000V?
Edited by Strider49 - 4/8/14 at 4:17pm
post #38 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Strider49 View Post

I'm getting the 780 Ti primarily for two reasons: one is that I'll be upgrading to a 1440p @120Hz+ monitor (ASUS PG278Q) and need all that horsepower, and the other is longevity. I know I won't be needing to overclock this beast of a card for quite some time, but being able to do so safely when needed is certainly a plus in the long run. When I buy something, I don't look just at the immediate future, that's why I'm choosing between brands that offer a 3-year warranty in my country too. Also, it doesn't even imply voiding your warranty... and I'm not one of those guys trying to squeeze the maximum out of their cards just to show some numbers on the internet and be in the top places of the tables. I'm simply a gamer who wants to be able to do some nice OC when it's really needed and to tweak the voltages as much as it is permitted. wink.gif
And yes, I'm investing my hard earned money here, not my parents'.
Thanks for your feedback! thumb.gif Well, I really wanted to put the card under water in the future to hit those temps you are reporting and assist in the cooling of the GPU and hot VRMs, but that's not a good thing. I don't wanna mess things up and end up voiding the warranty.

On the other hand, a friend told me that I should not worry about those hot VRM temps reported by Guru, and that ASUS has an immaculate track record over the last few years regarding graphics cards coolers.

Btw, 1.000 V?

I never accused you of ANY of this stuff. You seem rather intelligent since you know what you want with your graphics card. I assumed you were using your own money. I don't even know how old you are and I am not assuming your parents are paying for anything. But just remember that if you mess with the voltages, and it breaks, and the manufacturer sees that the voltages were changed, then you can forget about an RMA. It happened to my best friend with his motherboard. His motherboard got too hot from the overclock and they refused the RMA. Just make sure you stay within the safe operating temperature. That's all. You probably know more about overclocking than I do. However I do know about dealing with shady manufacturers because they think an expensive part they gave me was broken from "abuse." And I would think twice before doing any of this to such an expensive graphics card.
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post #39 of 46
Im a bit of an asus gpu fan for sure. I have had an asus gtx570, 670, and now 770. The 770 I did the hotwire mod. I pushed the gpu as high as 1.5v benching with the gpu core on water and the vrm on air and the card took it like a champ (only monitored vrm heatsink with IR temp sensor). I have done gaming at 1.395v with the same setup and no issues. I got the card at launch, in bf4 alone I have 63hrs logged and I know less than 5hrs was at stock voltage. Most of it was at 1.33v but Im sure at least 20hrs was 1.395v.

Now the 780ti is a VERY different animal, but it shows the kind of durability asus brings to the table.

edit:
EVGA does have amazing customer support though, but depending on your country, asus may be as good. There have been some nightmare stories regarding asus rma but a lot of manufacturers have those stories as well.
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post #40 of 46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thready View Post

I never accused you of ANY of this stuff. You seem rather intelligent since you know what you want with your graphics card. I assumed you were using your own money. I don't even know how old you are and I am not assuming your parents are paying for anything. But just remember that if you mess with the voltages, and it breaks, and the manufacturer sees that the voltages were changed, then you can forget about an RMA. It happened to my best friend with his motherboard. His motherboard got too hot from the overclock and they refused the RMA. Just make sure you stay within the safe operating temperature. That's all. You probably know more about overclocking than I do. However I do know about dealing with shady manufacturers because they think an expensive part they gave me was broken from "abuse." And I would think twice before doing any of this to such an expensive graphics card.

Yeah, I know you never accused me of anything, I was just trying to make my point. smile.gif And believe me, I understand yours too. You are totally right in what you're saying, and thank you very much for your insight. As in all things in life, good sense is needed in the first place. And from what I see in the reviews, one cannot simply tweak with the Asus card too much on air or it will begin to overheat.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 66racer View Post

Im a bit of an asus gpu fan for sure. I have had an asus gtx570, 670, and now 770. The 770 I did the hotwire mod. I pushed the gpu as high as 1.5v benching with the gpu core on water and the vrm on air and the card took it like a champ (only monitored vrm heatsink with IR temp sensor). I have done gaming at 1.395v with the same setup and no issues. I got the card at launch, in bf4 alone I have 63hrs logged and I know less than 5hrs was at stock voltage. Most of it was at 1.33v but Im sure at least 20hrs was 1.395v.

Now the 780ti is a VERY different animal, but it shows the kind of durability asus brings to the table.

edit:
EVGA does have amazing customer support though, but depending on your country, asus may be as good. There have been some nightmare stories regarding asus rma but a lot of manufacturers have those stories as well.

The 780 Ti is almost like a toaster. tongue.gif I guess it isn't easy to keep all those 2880 cores cool whilst overvolting.
I live in Portugal, don't know if there is any difference between Asus and EVGA support here.
Edited by Strider49 - 4/8/14 at 5:03pm
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