Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel CPUs › Circumvent the silicon lottery?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Circumvent the silicon lottery? - Page 2

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by ladcrooks View Post

when the i7920 came out i asked specifically for a do and not a co! Novatech sent me a co and didn't notice till later on having built the syetm and was testing using cpuz that i noticed. When i rang them they said it was a mistake and he tried to tell me that the co and do hardly worth worring about. It was his conning voice that i picked upon and made him rectify the solution - hence got my do chip in the end and they got a very bad review.

the point is i can bet that they didn't have a do in stock and tried to palm me off with a co and once in my system i would not be bothered to change it mad.gif

So yeah imagine what they would do if they could cherry pick - mates, themselves and others would buy up the best biggrin.gif

Would like to add - The silicon lotterey

To a serious OC i can understand but would i worry about a 4.7 over a 4.5 ? Nope biggrin.gif

Would i worry about a 4.9 over a 5.0 ? yep! biggrin.gif

That's a rather different situation - Intel sold C0 and D0 920's as separate products with different SKUs (and charged slightly more for the D0), so there's no way it could've been a mistake - what they did was the equivalent of selling a 4770K and then shipping out a regular 4770 without the K.
Quote:
Originally Posted by drufause View Post

Technically speaking, having a K rated chip means that it is allowed to be over-clocked at your own risk. Most stores are not going to be checking a sealed retail processor just to test it for over-clocking unless you want to pay a huge mark up when the find one that hits a sweet spot. Extrapolating what you are asking for is so far outside what a normal store would do for a customer, and that is coming from someone who used to run a customer computer shop. In theory a large custom shop could go though some oem chips that come on trays but to run the clocks and multipliers up on them and potentially wipe a part that costs a few hundred dollars is bad for business. A store doing this for a customer would potentially cost double retail. If I had tried this for a customer I would charge triple MSRP for the part just due to the risk of damage to parts the store is testing. It is one thing for a reviewer to get an ES chip from Intel or AMD and run the clocks and multipliers up as if they break it they are just sending it back to its Source in the first place. I am sorry you have had bad luck and you’re not getting the kind of frequency your expecting from your K chip. If you check EBAY you will find chips people have over-clocked already also here on the trade boards you will find chips that have already been over-clocked. But asking most computer shops to do this especially when a lot of them only have boxed retail proc would be beyond what a normal store would be willing to do without a multiplied markup in price.

And on top of that there's also the cost of labor - after all, an employee has to spend time testing the overclocking potential of each chip in order to bin them accordingly.

Ultimately, for this to work, the store would have to charge insane prices on the golden chips - and anybody with that kind of budget would probably get a 4930K or 4960X anyway.
Edited by Peon - 4/7/14 at 2:26pm
The Ancient
(14 items)
 
  
Reply
The Ancient
(14 items)
 
  
Reply
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by FtW 420 View Post

Pretty much down to buying a used chip that has been tested for low voltage/high clocks.
Or an 8 pack system, he does bin the chips, although he doesn't sell the cpus by themselves, I've tried talking him into selling golden chips but he saves those to sell in the prebuilt 8 pack rigs http://www.overclockers.co.uk/LP/8-pack-systems.php

Good Lord those rigs are expensive! But then again I guess 4770k clocked to at leats 4.9ghz is pretty rare, ive not seen any go that high. And it looks like a lot of time and effort has gone into those custom WC setups.

To roelst, like everyone says just buy used binned chips. There are generally two types of second hand chips you can buy, first is say a 5ghz cpu that has been prime tested, second is your 63x multiplier chips that have been used under LN2. Generally id prefer to buy the chip that has been prime tested, since benchers generally dont like to run prime95 for hours prior to advertising them, plus benching chips are usually more expensive.
post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the advise. I think I'll just wait for Devils Canyon to come out. I have an i3 laying around so I can use that one for the comming two months.
Black 'n White
(7 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 4670k MSI z87 mpower Inno3D GTX 780 Kingston HyperX Beast @1866MHz 
CoolingPowerCase
custom loop Cooler Master V1000 NZXT Switch 810 
  hide details  
Reply
Black 'n White
(7 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 4670k MSI z87 mpower Inno3D GTX 780 Kingston HyperX Beast @1866MHz 
CoolingPowerCase
custom loop Cooler Master V1000 NZXT Switch 810 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Intel CPUs
Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel CPUs › Circumvent the silicon lottery?