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water loop help!!!

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
the idea is to run 2x 360 radiators to cool a gtx 780 ti,3570k and the chipset eventually i will upgrade the graphics card to a dual gpu card gtx 790. the question is for the incoming flow (chilled water) I am planing to split it with a y fitting so the cpu and gpu get individual cold water lines and not in a chain cpu>>Gpu. Then use another y splitter for the warm water from the cpu and gpu. Does anyone know how effective this is?
post #2 of 8
What kind of chiller are you using?
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post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
Have not decided yet
post #4 of 8
To your original question... I don't have any experience with active cooling so I'm not sure whether the actual difference between input and output coolant temps would be large enough to make going dual loop that much better than single loop. But, there's nothing wrong with trying biggrin.gif I know in a "normal" loop, coolant temps have only a small variation, due to flow rate. I suspect the same would be true with active chilling, except your overall equilibrium temps would be appreciably lower. I'm also assuming you're planning a closed loop where the same coolant recirculates.

If you haven't searched yet, there are plenty of threads here dealing with chillers. Also check out the specialized cooling forum, although at the moment it looks like they're having some kind of website snafu in that section.
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post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by threephi View Post

To your original question... I don't have any experience with active cooling so I'm not sure whether the actual difference between input and output coolant temps would be large enough to make going dual loop that much better than single loop. But, there's nothing wrong with trying biggrin.gif I know in a "normal" loop, coolant temps have only a small variation, due to flow rate. I suspect the same would be true with active chilling, except your overall equilibrium temps would be appreciably lower. I'm also assuming you're planning a closed loop where the same coolant recirculates.

If you haven't searched yet, there are plenty of threads here dealing with chillers. Also check out the specialized cooling forum, although at the moment it looks like they're having some kind of website snafu in that section.
This was very helpful also I realized I did not mean a chiller but a radiator
post #6 of 8
Splitting the loop like that has a couple of issues:

They way you have it set up most of the flow will go through the GPU block as it has a lot lower restriction that the CPU + northbridge loop. That will lead to very little flow, and therefore poor temperatures, on your CPU. One way you can solve this is to put a control valve on the GPU line to increase the restriction and force more water through the CPU + nothbridge section.

Even if you do mange to equalize the flow through both branches you will still be seeing half the overall flow through either (although the overall flow rate will be slightly higher than the same loop in serial), meaning a high flow pump(s) will be required.


Honestly I would just simplify things run everything in serial. Water temperature does not change by much as it goes through the loop, typically less than 3°C for a CPU + GPU loop. For reference it takes ~260W to heat water moving at 1GPM by 1°C, that means that your CPU and GPU will add ~1°C when running flat out. Not really an issue even if you do put your CPU after you GPU.
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post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alasmodified View Post

This was very helpful also I realized I did not mean a chiller but a radiator
Aha! I had a suspicion that might be the case, but you never know biggrin.gif. There's really no good reason to split the loop then, just run everything in series like GingerJohn mentioned. The one rule is to put the res immediately before the pump so it is less likely to run dry, and also to aid bleeding and filling etc. Other than that, you can order your components in whichever way is the most practical or looks the best.

In my experience, the variation in water temp is usually even smaller than what GingerJohn stated--only one degree C as measured anywhere in the loop, but YMMV.

FWIW, a standard radiator/fan setup is just like standard air cooling in that you are constrained by ambient air temp--you can't go lower than that. As you've probably figured out, the term "chiller" refers to systems such as peltiers, bongs, or other refrigeration methods that actively remove heat instead of merely dispersing it.
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post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GingerJohn View Post

Splitting the loop like that has a couple of issues:

They way you have it set up most of the flow will go through the GPU block as it has a lot lower restriction that the CPU + northbridge loop. That will lead to very little flow, and therefore poor temperatures, on your CPU. One way you can solve this is to put a control valve on the GPU line to increase the restriction and force more water through the CPU + nothbridge section.

Even if you do mange to equalize the flow through both branches you will still be seeing half the overall flow through either (although the overall flow rate will be slightly higher than the same loop in serial), meaning a high flow pump(s) will be required.


Honestly I would just simplify things run everything in serial. Water temperature does not change by much as it goes through the loop, typically less than 3°C for a CPU + GPU loop. For reference it takes ~260W to heat water moving at 1GPM by 1°C, that means that your CPU and GPU will add ~1°C when running flat out. Not really an issue even if you do put your CPU after you GPU.
Quote:
Originally Posted by threephi View Post

Aha! I had a suspicion that might be the case, but you never know biggrin.gif. There's really no good reason to split the loop then, just run everything in series like GingerJohn mentioned. The one rule is to put the res immediately before the pump so it is less likely to run dry, and also to aid bleeding and filling etc. Other than that, you can order your components in whichever way is the most practical or looks the best.

In my experience, the variation in water temp is usually even smaller than what GingerJohn stated--only one degree C as measured anywhere in the loop, but YMMV.

FWIW, a standard radiator/fan setup is just like standard air cooling in that you are constrained by ambient air temp--you can't go lower than that. As you've probably figured out, the term "chiller" refers to systems such as peltiers, bongs, or other refrigeration methods that actively remove heat instead of merely dispersing it.
thank you both I guess that solves the issue. I had thought about the flow restriction of the cpu and northbridge i just needed someone to affirm the assumptions:thumb:
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