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Wanting to create a Linux partition on external HDD but I need yall's helps!

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
I will just number my questions to make it easier.

1) I intend on running Linux from my 750 GB external HDD. I am going to nuke it and redo all of the partitions since it only has some old documents on it. I am going to make 4 partitions. I am using a FAT 32 partition of 50 GB for Playstation 3 and 4 backups. The 2nd partition will just be for random crap that I put on there. I probably would like 100 GB for that. The 3rd partition will be 300 GB and have the bootable version of Linux. And the 4th partition will be left unpartitioned actually (I know that is a logical inconsistency). It will just be blank for a future partition if I ever create one.

So do you see any problems there? I think 300 GB for Linux is perfect considering that everything I do on Linux will be from the HDD. All of my programs and files will be on it. And since the HDD is USB 3.0 and both my PCs are USB 3.0 compatible, I don't anticipate much lag or slowdown.

2) I do not know what version of Linux I will put on there and this is where your personal preference might help me. This is mainly a learning experience for me. I will run some low power gamesand maybe some other fun stuff just to mess around. So I was thinking of using Mint. But if you have a better one then please tell me.

3) It has been a while since I changed my boot order in my BIOS, and I have never gone into my laptop's BIOS because I never had to, and I am wondering if my laptop will even let me boot from removable media. Does anyone know if laptops put up a fight when it comes to doing this?

4) What else? Any red flags? What should I expect? Is this even doable? Why should I even tinker with Linux in the first place? Is it worth it?
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Zen
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post #2 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thready View Post

I will just number my questions to make it easier.

1) I intend on running Linux from my 750 GB external HDD. I am going to nuke it and redo all of the partitions since it only has some old documents on it. I am going to make 4 partitions. I am using a FAT 32 partition of 50 GB for Playstation 3 and 4 backups. The 2nd partition will just be for random crap that I put on there. I probably would like 100 GB for that. The 3rd partition will be 300 GB and have the bootable version of Linux. And the 4th partition will be left unpartitioned actually (I know that is a logical inconsistency). It will just be blank for a future partition if I ever create one.

So do you see any problems there? I think 300 GB for Linux is perfect considering that everything I do on Linux will be from the HDD. All of my programs and files will be on it. And since the HDD is USB 3.0 and both my PCs are USB 3.0 compatible, I don't anticipate much lag or slowdown.

I think this should work, but ALWAYS keep backups just in case. This should go without question.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thready View Post

2) I do not know what version of Linux I will put on there and this is where your personal preference might help me. This is mainly a learning experience for me. I will run some low power gamesand maybe some other fun stuff just to mess around. So I was thinking of using Mint. But if you have a better one then please tell me.

Mint is good. I like Fedora and OpenSUSE among many others. I've always thought that Fedora is a good balance between "easy" and "power" usage.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thready View Post

3) It has been a while since I changed my boot order in my BIOS, and I have never gone into my laptop's BIOS because I never had to, and I am wondering if my laptop will even let me boot from removable media. Does anyone know if laptops put up a fight when it comes to doing this?

No idea. Depends on your laptop. Try it or google it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thready View Post

4) What else? Any red flags? What should I expect? Is this even doable? Why should I even tinker with Linux in the first place? Is it worth it?

It's always doable. Sometimes it just takes longer to get things working. I guess for expectations... if you're coming from windows, DON'T expect it to be windows. Linux is not windows. Why should you tinker with it? I don't know; that's up to you. If you're thinking about working in the tech industry at all, then it's going to benefit you a lot to know how to use this swiss-army knife of an OS. I've seen people graduate from computer science and engineering programs, and all they know is how to click icons in windows... If you plan to work in this industry, you can imagine how people who know how to use other tools (in addition to windows) have an edge.
post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Hundred Gunner View Post

I think this should work, but ALWAYS keep backups just in case. This should go without question.
Mint is good. I like Fedora and OpenSUSE among many others. I've always thought that Fedora is a good balance between "easy" and "power" usage.
No idea. Depends on your laptop. Try it or google it.
It's always doable. Sometimes it just takes longer to get things working. I guess for expectations... if you're coming from windows, DON'T expect it to be windows. Linux is not windows. Why should you tinker with it? I don't know; that's up to you. If you're thinking about working in the tech industry at all, then it's going to benefit you a lot to know how to use this swiss-army knife of an OS. I've seen people graduate from computer science and engineering programs, and all they know is how to click icons in windows... If you plan to work in this industry, you can imagine how people who know how to use other tools (in addition to windows) have an edge.

cool cool. I am actually only doing this because I am bored. I tried getting into the computer industry but I do not have patience with computers and I can't see myself working with them.
Zen
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i5-6600k Gigabyte Z170XP-SLI RX 480 4GB 24 GB DDR4 2133MHz 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
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Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Seagate 1 TB H60 Windows 10 Asus mx27a 
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hp 2009 m Corsair MR Brown Antec Earthwatts 650 Razer Naga 
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Zen
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i5-6600k Gigabyte Z170XP-SLI RX 480 4GB 24 GB DDR4 2133MHz 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung 850 evo OCZ Vertex 4 Crucial MX 500 256GB WD Black 3 TB 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Seagate 1 TB H60 Windows 10 Asus mx27a 
MonitorKeyboardPowerMouse
hp 2009 m Corsair MR Brown Antec Earthwatts 650 Razer Naga 
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Soundblaster Omni 
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post #4 of 5
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Hundred Gunner View Post

I think this should work, but ALWAYS keep backups just in case. This should go without question.
Mint is good. I like Fedora and OpenSUSE among many others. I've always thought that Fedora is a good balance between "easy" and "power" usage.
No idea. Depends on your laptop. Try it or google it.
It's always doable. Sometimes it just takes longer to get things working. I guess for expectations... if you're coming from windows, DON'T expect it to be windows. Linux is not windows. Why should you tinker with it? I don't know; that's up to you. If you're thinking about working in the tech industry at all, then it's going to benefit you a lot to know how to use this swiss-army knife of an OS. I've seen people graduate from computer science and engineering programs, and all they know is how to click icons in windows... If you plan to work in this industry, you can imagine how people who know how to use other tools (in addition to windows) have an edge.

I wanted to add that I decided to use a small USB 3.0 drive to put it on because if I put the entire OS on an external HDD and the USB unplugs itself on accident, then I'm gonna have a bad time. And we don't like bad times. So I figured that putting it on a USB drive is safer in case I bump into the computer or something. And if the USB drive gets unplugged by accident and breaks, it is much easier to dea lwith than an external HDD breaking.
Zen
(17 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-6600k Gigabyte Z170XP-SLI RX 480 4GB 24 GB DDR4 2133MHz 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung 850 evo OCZ Vertex 4 Crucial MX 500 256GB WD Black 3 TB 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Seagate 1 TB H60 Windows 10 Asus mx27a 
MonitorKeyboardPowerMouse
hp 2009 m Corsair MR Brown Antec Earthwatts 650 Razer Naga 
Audio
Soundblaster Omni 
  hide details  
Reply
Zen
(17 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-6600k Gigabyte Z170XP-SLI RX 480 4GB 24 GB DDR4 2133MHz 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung 850 evo OCZ Vertex 4 Crucial MX 500 256GB WD Black 3 TB 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Seagate 1 TB H60 Windows 10 Asus mx27a 
MonitorKeyboardPowerMouse
hp 2009 m Corsair MR Brown Antec Earthwatts 650 Razer Naga 
Audio
Soundblaster Omni 
  hide details  
Reply
post #5 of 5
I run an ext 500gb drive on my laptop with Ubuntu installed on it, runs perfectly fine, just create a live install USB, then when installing, select that drive and do the formatting within the installer, and make sure to select that drive for the location of the boot loader install, otherwise even when it's not plugged in, you'll still be prompted with choosing what OS to boot, as opposed to just reboot, unplug, and violla! back in windoze.
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