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Recurring Algae

post #1 of 43
Thread Starter 
Hello Community,
I've had some terrible experiences with algae in my cooling loop. I used this starter kit: Raystorm Cooling Kit when I first assembled my computer. After a few months, the tubes were green, and I was pissed. SO.... I looked up how to cure an algae infection, and found the tutorial where you use bleach on the plastic parts and boil the radiator, CPU block, fittings, etc. I did all that, carefully assembled the loop with brand new tubing (cleaned with distilled water/bleach), filled the reservoir with pure distilled water, and put a few drops of Copper Sulfate "Dead Water" biocide. I continued to put a drop or two in every two months or so, and yet it still looks like this now:

What am I doing wrong, and what can I do to fix this??

Thanks,
Joe
post #2 of 43
i use a silver kill coil and haven't had any problems but in all likelihood the first time you had the issue when you cleaned everything you probably did not get all of it and it grew back in.
post #3 of 43
Thread Starter 
I heard that the kill coil can have adverse reactions with the metal in the CPU block, is that true?
post #4 of 43
There is a chance it can speed up galvanic corrosion since they are somewhat dissimilar, but they are still close enough that they can be used together without a huge risk. Nothing like that of Aluminum and copper. The further apart they are on the chart, the higher the risk of galvanic corrosion. I used to use a silver coil with my copper blocks and never had a problem. I recently switch to PTNuke during the latest rebuild though
post #5 of 43
It's not algae, and it never was. It's plasticizer. You did a such a good job nuking anything that could possibly live in your loop that I don't see any other logical explanation.

What kind of tubing are you using?
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post #6 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by jike27 View Post

I heard that the kill coil can have adverse reactions with the metal in the CPU block, is that true?

Quote:
Originally Posted by morencyam View Post

There is a chance it can speed up galvanic corrosion since they are somewhat dissimilar, but they are still close enough that they can be used together without a huge risk. Nothing like that of Aluminum and copper. The further apart they are on the chart, the higher the risk of galvanic corrosion. I used to use a silver coil with my copper blocks and never had a problem. I recently switch to PTNuke during the latest rebuild though
That's not quite why. Galvanic corrosion requires that the two metals be in electrical contact in the presence of an electrolyte. No electrical contact and there's no galvanic corrosion, at least as it pertains to that particular piece of metal. In most cases people put the kill coil inside their acrylic/delrin reservoir, resting against plastic, which insulates it from electrical contact with anything else.

The reason it's thought that kill coils contribute to corrosion is that the free silver ions can combine with other impurities in the coolant to make it electrolytic, and accelerate corrosion between two other metals somewhere else in the loop. And there will always be some kind of electrical interface somewhere, especially at a screw hole, where you might have nickel plating scratched or worn away exposing copper beneath it, as well as possible contact with the brass of the fitting at the same location. Weld points inside radiators are another example, or where the brass screw threads or brass chambers are welded to the copper body of the rad, etc.

So the concerns about kill coils have nothing to do with silver's anodic potential as it relates to other metals since at least as far as kill coils go, they are usually not themselves in electrical contact with the other metal.

BTW it's also probably not strictly correct to say that the risk of corrosion is related to the anodic potential as shown on that chart. Increased potential increases of the rate of corrosion and the strength of the reaction.
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post #7 of 43
Wait a minute.
Firstly, they are all in electrical contact.
They are submerged in water, remember?
That is a conductor right there.

Secondly, even if you could keep your water non-conductive all the time, the metals will release ions into the water.
Those ions will travel around to make contact with the other metals.
So all wetted metals end up in direct contact with each other.

We have a cottage and one time, we spent 3 years without going there.
When we went back for the first time again, the water smelled and tasted of a metal. We had to run the taps for a whole day to clear it out of the taps.
That was copper from the plumbing dissolving itself into the water.

And tho, I would try it myself. I'm pretty sure if you taste the coolant after a year, there will be a metallic taste to it.

That's all it takes really for the metals to be in direct contact.
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post #8 of 43
If it were algae it would have clogged your waterblock up by now. Have you tried taking it apart to look at the channels?
post #9 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by PepeLapiu View Post

Wait a minute.
Firstly, they are all in electrical contact.
They are submerged in water, remember?
That is a conductor right there.

Secondly, even if you could keep your water non-conductive all the time, the metals will release ions into the water.
Those ions will travel around to make contact with the other metals.
So all wetted metals end up in direct contact with each other.

We have a cottage and one time, we spent 3 years without going there.
When we went back for the first time again, the water smelled and tasted of a metal. We had to run the taps for a whole day to clear it out of the taps.
That was copper from the plumbing dissolving itself into the water.

And tho, I would try it myself. I'm pretty sure if you taste the coolant after a year, there will be a metallic taste to it.

That's all it takes really for the metals to be in direct contact.
That's not what is meant by electrical contact in the context of galvanic corrosion. The electrolyte is the liquid that washes them both and completes the circuit in a way, but it can't also be the electrical connector, or either the anode or the cathode at the same time. For galvanic corrosion, the two metals have to be solids with a physical electrical conducting path between them. And then you also need the electrolyte on top of that.

Also, ions in solution behave differently than solids butting up against each other. Other kinds of reactions can occur, but they're not galvanic corrosion.
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post #10 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by threephi View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by PepeLapiu View Post

Wait a minute.
Firstly, they are all in electrical contact.
They are submerged in water, remember?
That is a conductor right there.

Secondly, even if you could keep your water non-conductive all the time, the metals will release ions into the water.
Those ions will travel around to make contact with the other metals.
So all wetted metals end up in direct contact with each other.

We have a cottage and one time, we spent 3 years without going there.
When we went back for the first time again, the water smelled and tasted of a metal. We had to run the taps for a whole day to clear it out of the taps.
That was copper from the plumbing dissolving itself into the water.

And tho, I would try it myself. I'm pretty sure if you taste the coolant after a year, there will be a metallic taste to it.

That's all it takes really for the metals to be in direct contact.
That's not what is meant by electrical contact in the context of galvanic corrosion. The electrolyte is the liquid that washes them both and completes the circuit in a way, but it can't also be the electrical connector, or either the anode or the cathode at the same time. For galvanic corrosion, the two metals have to be solids with a physical electrical conducting path between them. And then you also need the electrolyte on top of that.

Also, ions in solution behave differently than solids butting up against each other. Other kinds of reactions can occur, but they're not galvanic corrosion.

This.
Galavnic corrosion requires direct contact in presence of an electrolyte.
OP,tubing goes like that after while,the fogging is water permeation coupled with plasticizer leech,replace the tube after a strip down,do not reuse it.
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