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[Wired] Google embeds Camera in Smart Contact Lense - Page 5

post #41 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mand12 View Post

As an optical engineer, I'll say that this is a lot more complicated than it sounds. Getting a camera into a contact is hard enough, but creating a programmably deformable lens to that scale is another thing entirely. There are deformable lenses that you can adjust the optical power of, but they're bulky, complicated systems. Just getting data loaded into the lenses doesn't change their prescription - you need to physically change their shape.

Doing that would be ridiculously hard.

Also, as far as recording data about your vision, contact lenses are on the outside of your eye. It can't tell what happens in your eye because the light hasn't hit your eye yet.

Thinking outside the box is fine, but you can't think outside the physics.

That's where people who know what they're talking about come in, hence your post. I wasn't talking just about deformable lenses though. With the proper sensors in place and all the metrics from in-depth optometrist visits in place, I'm sure there is something they could finagle to offer better than what we have now.
My thoughts wasn't about deforming the lens, but deforming the information as it comes through the lens to match your prescription. Think of it like adding the anti-blur/image stabilization in reverse. May not work, or may be hard to implement, but worth looking into.
If you want an example of what's guiding my thoughts that way, look up what a person who sees an effective 20/800 really sees. There are pictures out there comparing a 20/20 picture to what a visually impaired person sees. I have 20/800, so I'm very interested in this stuff. Feasible or not right now, or in 10 years even, it's a good road to pursue. My eyes will still suck in 10 years lol.
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post #42 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Valor958 View Post

My thoughts wasn't about deforming the lens, but deforming the information as it comes through the lens to match your prescription. Think of it like adding the anti-blur/image stabilization in reverse. May not work, or may be hard to implement, but worth looking into.

Not a bad concept, but the problem is simple: in order to measure the light going through the lens, you have to detect it. In order to detect it, you have to stop it. If you stop it, it can't go through the rest of your eye to the retina.

What you're describing is called adaptive optics, and is commonly used in telescopes. I've worked on some of the systems involved, and they branch off a portion of the light coming in, analyze it, and then physically manipulate a mirror in order to distort it to compensate for other distortions elsewhere, like atmospheric variations (why stars twinkle).

The idea of applying that to a human optical system is a reasonable idea, but it's not the sort of thing you can fit in a contact lens. There just isn't enough room. You can miniaturize electronics very well, but miniaturizing optics doesn't work the same way. Something that's scaled down doesn't still work the same way, like an electronic circuit could, because optical systems require certain distances in order to do their jobs.

You mention deforming the information, and there are two ways to do that. One is to to deform it when the information is still light - to do this, you need to deform an optical component, whether it is a mirror, lens, microlens array, whatever. The other is to deform it when the information is in the electronics - to do this, you'd have to detect the light, convert it to electrical signals, do your processing, and then have a display on the other side of the contact that presents the corrected information to the rest of the eye. Theoretically possible, I suppose, but damn will it be complicated.
post #43 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mand12 View Post

Not a bad concept, but the problem is simple: in order to measure the light going through the lens, you have to detect it. In order to detect it, you have to stop it. If you stop it, it can't go through the rest of your eye to the retina.

What you're describing is called adaptive optics, and is commonly used in telescopes. I've worked on some of the systems involved, and they branch off a portion of the light coming in, analyze it, and then physically manipulate a mirror in order to distort it to compensate for other distortions elsewhere, like atmospheric variations (why stars twinkle).

The idea of applying that to a human optical system is a reasonable idea, but it's not the sort of thing you can fit in a contact lens. There just isn't enough room. You can miniaturize electronics very well, but miniaturizing optics doesn't work the same way. Something that's scaled down doesn't still work the same way, like an electronic circuit could, because optical systems require certain distances in order to do their jobs.

You mention deforming the information, and there are two ways to do that. One is to to deform it when the information is still light - to do this, you need to deform an optical component, whether it is a mirror, lens, microlens array, whatever. The other is to deform it when the information is in the electronics - to do this, you'd have to detect the light, convert it to electrical signals, do your processing, and then have a display on the other side of the contact that presents the corrected information to the rest of the eye. Theoretically possible, I suppose, but damn will it be complicated.

And that, good sir, is where I specialize. I'm great at thinking in theory, with exceptionally difficult applications to follow. I'm about 50/50 for eventual practical application lol. I remember my earliest design for something overly complicated was when I first started tinkering in CAD. I was inspired by Starship Troopers to design basically a nuclear tank shell. In hindsight, what I designed was basically a tank fired dirty bomb lol. After talking to a professor in Nuclear Engineering about it when I was in college, he also said basically the same thing as you. It's theoretically possible, but would very complicated lol.
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post #44 of 47
This is precisely why, though, we have both scientists and engineers. Very different skill sets.
post #45 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mand12 View Post

This is precisely why, though, we have both scientists and engineers. Very different skill sets.

But I like thinking up 'technically possible' stuff just to complicate peoples lives biggrin.gif Don't kill ma' dreams!
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post #46 of 47
NB4 Porn Industry buys the technology ! thumb.gif
    
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post #47 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frankzro View Post

NB4 Porn Industry buys the technology ! thumb.gif


NB4 the contact lense camera inbeds itself into your brain

NB4 DeathLok Program

NB4 Soldiers use them, to receive commands via Satellite

NB4 Special cameras need to be created just to scan for said device

NB4 All Hell breaks loose.
    
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