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Whats your favourtie Linux desktop feature ? - Page 3

post #21 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cones View Post

Don't think it was mentioned but I can type something and hover my mouse over a different window and scroll while continuing to type, hate when I go to windows and I have to keep clicking back and forth. Also how fast it is to turn my computer off compared to windows.

I did not know that thinking.gif
post #22 of 58
I think some DEs it's a setting but all the ones I've used it's possible.
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My System
(21 items)
 
Server/HTPC
(11 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD 8320 Asus m5a99fx pro EVGA 660ti  Gskill 8GB F3-1600C9-8GXM x2 
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post #23 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by valvehead View Post

Easily fixed with Wizmouse. It's one of the first things I install in new Windows installations. You're right though, it's incredibly annoying when that feature isn't there. I didn't even realize how essential is was until I used Linux for the first time.

My favorite features of Linux? Package managers and man pages. I also like the large variety of different DEs and WMs. I haven't settled on one yet though.
Man pages aren't desktop features.

And all of the stuff talked about in this thread could be added to Windows via third party programs, but by the very fact that it requires third party support, they're not a feature of the Windows desktop.
post #24 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan9 View Post

Man pages aren't desktop features.

And all of the stuff talked about in this thread could be added to Windows via third party programs, but by the very fact that it requires third party support, they're not a feature of the Windows desktop.

There is a certain degree of wonderment at how windows misses so many essential desktop features you never knew you needed.
post #25 of 58
Quote:
Man pages aren't desktop features.
This does remind me, though - man & info kioslaves are awesome.
post #26 of 58
Is this an NSA poll so that they can decide which of our favorite utilities to backdoor next? smile.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by TFL Replica View Post

Snapping windows to edges and corners.

And the "pause when dragging your window and it rubs against another window or the edge of the screen unless you push a little harder" feature biggrin.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan9 View Post

Being able to make windows "sticky". I've lost count of the amount of times I've been in Windows and needed to keep a window in the foreground even after it's lost focus. It's invaluable on smaller screens where ever inch of real estate is expensive.

Yes, the "always on top" feature is amazingly handy. OSX doesn't even have this. It seems like it would be a relatively easy thing to implement.

Once thing, though, is that "always on top" windows are all equal. It would be interesting to be able to have different levels of "always on top."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan9 View Post

To be quite honest, using Windows feels like having a limb cut off - it's GUI shells are so under developed it's ridiculous.

Windows lacks flexibility so bad that it's like trying to use a computer in a goddamn straightjacket.

==================
One thing I wish they would adopt in a Linux DE is making windows independent of open applications. For example, I might be logged into OCN, read a few pages, then close all of the browser windows because I'm not using it anymore. But because the application closes after all of its windows are closed, I have to log in later on (yes, I *could* save cookies from one browsing session to another, but I don't want to.) If the application could remain open even after its windows were closed, I could use a session all day or until I actually wanted to quit it.
post #27 of 58
That doesn't make a whole lit of sense as you are saving cookies regardless otherwise you wouldn't be able to log in properly to begin with. It's just the cookie time out is minutes instead of days. Your solution wouldn't fix that, it would just needlessly consume RAM.

Having what you described does make sense for stateful / persistent connections like IRC and instant messaging clients though. And for programs which require notifications even though you don't always want to content visible (Eg email). But HTTP is a stateless protocol which is content driven, so there isn't any point keeping a browser in memory after the windows have closed.

As for OCN specifically, since your login is sent in clear text (ie not over TLS), you'd be more secure just ticking the always logged in option and only sending a session cookie instead of your user name and password .
post #28 of 58
I have cookies flushed only when I close the browser application, so yes, that's exactly what I'm doing - saving cookies until I manually close the browser application. I don't mind having it open all day because with 16GB of RAM, I don't really need to worry.

Email and music are another couple of good examples: In OSX, I can have my mail client in the background without any window open, and it will continuously check mail. With outlook, I have to minimize the window, otherwise mail no longer gets checked. Similarly for music: it's nice to be able to choose a song or station, then close the window since it's no longer needed. Although I think some windows programs may support running in the "task bar" when you close the window...
post #29 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Hundred Gunner View Post

I have cookies flushed only when I close the browser application, so yes, that's exactly what I'm doing - saving cookies until I manually close the browser application. I don't mind having it open all day because with 16GB of RAM, I don't really need to worry.
To be honest, it seems to me like you're trying to reinvent the wheel (and a less effective one at that). I mean, if you really want a set up akin to what you're describing then just put your browser cache on a RAM disk, that way you don't have to have the browser running the whole time, you still have persistent cookies when you close your browser down but you still wipe them clean on every reboot. Or maybe set a sysv / systemd init script that purges it rather doing so after closing the browser. Or, in my opinion the best solution yet; don't delete your cookies (I don't really see the point in purging your cookies on each reboot - it's not really any more secure, it's just damn inconvenient)
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Hundred Gunner View Post

Email and music are another couple of good examples: In OSX, I can have my mail client in the background without any window open, and it will continuously check mail. With outlook, I have to minimize the window, otherwise mail no longer gets checked. Similarly for music: it's nice to be able to choose a song or station, then close the window since it's no longer needed. Although I think some windows programs may support running in the "task bar" when you close the window...
Are we still talking about Linux here or is this a general rant about Windows? I ask because all the Linux desktop email clients I've used will check mail even after the window is closed. Same goes for quite a few Linux media players too (in fact I think this is true for Windows media players as well)
post #30 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan9 View Post

To be honest, it seems to me like you're trying to reinvent the wheel (and a less effective one at that). I mean, if you really want a set up akin to what you're describing then just put your browser cache on a RAM disk, that way you don't have to have the browser running the whole time, you still have persistent cookies when you close your browser down but you still wipe them clean on every reboot. Or maybe set a sysv / systemd init script that purges it rather doing so after closing the browser. Or, in my opinion the best solution yet; don't delete your cookies (I don't really see the point in purging your cookies on each reboot - it's not really any more secure, it's just damn inconvenient)

It's not a security thing for me; it's just a convenience thing. I have a few sites that I wihtelist to keep their cookies all the time, and the rest I like to be able to wipe sometimes just by closing the browser (not necessarily by reboot.) And aside from that, it resets my temporary outgoing firewall rules which only stick around "until quit." I'll admit that most people don't use their browser this way, though.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan9 View Post

Are we still talking about Linux here or is this a general rant about Windows? I ask because all the Linux desktop email clients I've used will check mail even after the window is closed. Same goes for quite a few Linux media players too (in fact I think this is true for Windows media players as well)

You may be right - I haven't spent much time with Linux email clients or media players.
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