Overclock.net › Forums › Software, Programming and Coding › Operating Systems › Linux, Unix › What drive do I install Linux on for dual boot?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What drive do I install Linux on for dual boot?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I'm pretty familiar with Linux to the point where I've been thinking about installing Arch on my main rig (Echo One), or Ubuntu since I'm lazy. Whatever my distro, I have these drives:
  • Crucial 64GB SSD with Windows on it and about 20GB of free space
  • WD 2TB HDD that's about half full
  • Mushkin 60GB SSD which is an older model and I don't know how much life it has left

I'm not sure if I should try and install the OS onto the Crucial and use the WD for data, put the whole thing on a partition on the WD, install it on the Mushkin and attach that to a WD partition, or what. I might know Linux, but bootloaders are foreign territory for me.

What's the easiest way to do this?
XBMC HTPC
(10 items)
 
Echo One
(17 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom II X4 925 MSI 890FXA-GD70 EVGA GT 610 2GB CORSAIR Vengeance 16GB DDR3 1600 
Hard DriveCoolingOSKeyboard
Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB WD1002FAEX  Xigmatek Gaia XBMCBuntu 11.04 Generic Dell crap 
PowerCase
Coolmax 700W Apevia X-Jupiter-Jr Midtower 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel 4670K MSI Z87 AC ITX MSI GTX 760 ITX G.SKILL Sniper Series 2x8GB 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 850 Evo Western Digital Caviar Black Stock Intel Heatsink Windows 10 Home 
MonitorMonitorMonitorKeyboard
LG 25UM57 LG IPS226V-PN LG IPS226V-PN Logitech G910 Orion Spark 
CaseMouseMouse PadAudio
EVGA Hadron Hydro Logitech G502 Proteus Core SteelSeries QCK+  Corsair SP2500 
Audio
Corsair Vengeance 2000  
  hide details  
Reply
XBMC HTPC
(10 items)
 
Echo One
(17 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom II X4 925 MSI 890FXA-GD70 EVGA GT 610 2GB CORSAIR Vengeance 16GB DDR3 1600 
Hard DriveCoolingOSKeyboard
Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB WD1002FAEX  Xigmatek Gaia XBMCBuntu 11.04 Generic Dell crap 
PowerCase
Coolmax 700W Apevia X-Jupiter-Jr Midtower 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel 4670K MSI Z87 AC ITX MSI GTX 760 ITX G.SKILL Sniper Series 2x8GB 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 850 Evo Western Digital Caviar Black Stock Intel Heatsink Windows 10 Home 
MonitorMonitorMonitorKeyboard
LG 25UM57 LG IPS226V-PN LG IPS226V-PN Logitech G910 Orion Spark 
CaseMouseMouse PadAudio
EVGA Hadron Hydro Logitech G502 Proteus Core SteelSeries QCK+  Corsair SP2500 
Audio
Corsair Vengeance 2000  
  hide details  
Reply
post #2 of 10
With such little space left on the Crucial I'd scratch that out ( remember, you don't want to fill an SSD to it's limits technically ).

The easiest (imo) would simply be making a partition or two on the WD HDD. If you want SSD speed then taking a look at the Mushkin may be a good idea, but without knowing the life span ( should be fine if you've taken care of it ) then I wouldn't keep any critical files on it. Just remember if you use the SSD and Arch to set up the fstab with trim or discard or whichever the option is. Ubuntu does that automatically I believe, so if you want easy all set up then go Ubuntu ( or mint or one of the *Ubuntu flavours ).

It really doesn't matter where you install it, outside of personal preference, the bootloader will set up the dual boot for you with little ( usually no ) trouble. Just remember if you go with Arch to install os-prober and then run "grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg" so that it will detect Windows.
Edited by Shrak - 4/17/14 at 11:37am
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
Okay, I wasn't sure if it would become unhappy if I started spreading information around too much. SpeedFan claims the Mushkin has over 300 reallocated sectors which seems rather no bueno, so looks like I'll throw a few more partitions on for swap, / and /home and be on my merry way. First step is making an Arch LiveUSB on Windows, which is apparently an interesting task. I've installed Ubuntu a dozen times and while playing around with 14.04 would be nice I figured I'd mix things up a little bit, plus Arch looks sweet running i3WM.

As a sidenote, is there a reasonable way for the Linux distro to access the entire HDD (like the pictures and videos I have saved on Windows)? Or does the NTFS stop that from happening? I think I've gotten it to work in the past but I can't remember.
XBMC HTPC
(10 items)
 
Echo One
(17 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom II X4 925 MSI 890FXA-GD70 EVGA GT 610 2GB CORSAIR Vengeance 16GB DDR3 1600 
Hard DriveCoolingOSKeyboard
Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB WD1002FAEX  Xigmatek Gaia XBMCBuntu 11.04 Generic Dell crap 
PowerCase
Coolmax 700W Apevia X-Jupiter-Jr Midtower 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel 4670K MSI Z87 AC ITX MSI GTX 760 ITX G.SKILL Sniper Series 2x8GB 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 850 Evo Western Digital Caviar Black Stock Intel Heatsink Windows 10 Home 
MonitorMonitorMonitorKeyboard
LG 25UM57 LG IPS226V-PN LG IPS226V-PN Logitech G910 Orion Spark 
CaseMouseMouse PadAudio
EVGA Hadron Hydro Logitech G502 Proteus Core SteelSeries QCK+  Corsair SP2500 
Audio
Corsair Vengeance 2000  
  hide details  
Reply
XBMC HTPC
(10 items)
 
Echo One
(17 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom II X4 925 MSI 890FXA-GD70 EVGA GT 610 2GB CORSAIR Vengeance 16GB DDR3 1600 
Hard DriveCoolingOSKeyboard
Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB WD1002FAEX  Xigmatek Gaia XBMCBuntu 11.04 Generic Dell crap 
PowerCase
Coolmax 700W Apevia X-Jupiter-Jr Midtower 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel 4670K MSI Z87 AC ITX MSI GTX 760 ITX G.SKILL Sniper Series 2x8GB 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 850 Evo Western Digital Caviar Black Stock Intel Heatsink Windows 10 Home 
MonitorMonitorMonitorKeyboard
LG 25UM57 LG IPS226V-PN LG IPS226V-PN Logitech G910 Orion Spark 
CaseMouseMouse PadAudio
EVGA Hadron Hydro Logitech G502 Proteus Core SteelSeries QCK+  Corsair SP2500 
Audio
Corsair Vengeance 2000  
  hide details  
Reply
post #4 of 10
Most distro's either come with or allow you to install the ntfs-3g driver relatively easy to access any ntfs drive with ease
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by darthjoe229 View Post

I'm pretty familiar with Linux to the point where I've been thinking about installing Arch on my main rig (Echo One), or Ubuntu since I'm lazy. Whatever my distro, I have these drives:
  • Crucial 64GB SSD with Windows on it and about 20GB of free space
  • WD 2TB HDD that's about half full
  • Mushkin 60GB SSD which is an older model and I don't know how much life it has left

I'm not sure if I should try and install the OS onto the Crucial and use the WD for data, put the whole thing on a partition on the WD, install it on the Mushkin and attach that to a WD partition, or what. I might know Linux, but bootloaders are foreign territory for me.

What's the easiest way to do this?
Easiest is to use the Mushkin for Linux and just remember to save any data to your WD 2TB drive. If you have Windows data on the 2TB or it's formatted NTFS, then create a partition formatted ext4 for copying 'Linux data' to. It's best to back up data on the big drive but imho, this is the best method regarding what hardware setup you have.
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Q6600 Asus P5Q EVGA Geforce GTX 750 Kingston HyperX 4 x 2GB DDR2 800MHz 
OSPowerMouse Pad
Windows 7/Linux Corsair HX520W Antec 300 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Q6600 Asus P5Q EVGA Geforce GTX 750 Kingston HyperX 4 x 2GB DDR2 800MHz 
OSPowerMouse Pad
Windows 7/Linux Corsair HX520W Antec 300 
  hide details  
Reply
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by darthjoe229 View Post

Okay, I wasn't sure if it would become unhappy if I started spreading information around too much. SpeedFan claims the Mushkin has over 300 reallocated sectors which seems rather no bueno, so looks like I'll throw a few more partitions on for swap, / and /home and be on my merry way. First step is making an Arch LiveUSB on Windows, which is apparently an interesting task. I've installed Ubuntu a dozen times and while playing around with 14.04 would be nice I figured I'd mix things up a little bit, plus Arch looks sweet running i3WM.

As a sidenote, is there a reasonable way for the Linux distro to access the entire HDD (like the pictures and videos I have saved on Windows)? Or does the NTFS stop that from happening? I think I've gotten it to work in the past but I can't remember.
Ntfs-3g works really well nowadays - imho. The Linux OS can read the NTFS partitions but not the other way around (without 3rd party software - and not worth the trouble unless you needed to for some rare reason).
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Q6600 Asus P5Q EVGA Geforce GTX 750 Kingston HyperX 4 x 2GB DDR2 800MHz 
OSPowerMouse Pad
Windows 7/Linux Corsair HX520W Antec 300 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Q6600 Asus P5Q EVGA Geforce GTX 750 Kingston HyperX 4 x 2GB DDR2 800MHz 
OSPowerMouse Pad
Windows 7/Linux Corsair HX520W Antec 300 
  hide details  
Reply
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by noobee View Post

The Linux OS can read the NTFS partitions but not the other way around

Sure it can. That's what the ext2fs driver is for
Quote:
Originally Posted by noobee View Post

(without 3rd party software

And the NTFS-3G driver isn't?
Quote:
Originally Posted by noobee View Post

- and not worth the trouble unless you needed to for some rare reason).

Never had an issues with ext2fsd. Basic windows installer, reboot and done. Reads ext2/3/4 just fine, writes to ext2/3 just fine but only has issues with ext4 writing ( at least last time I used it, but that was ages ago )
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrak View Post

Sure it can. That's what the ext2fs driver is for
And the NTFS-3G driver isn't?
Never had an issues with ext2fsd. Basic windows installer, reboot and done. Reads ext2/3/4 just fine, writes to ext2/3 just fine but only has issues with ext4 writing ( at least last time I used it, but that was ages ago )
NTFS-3G is included in the kernel - as part of the system. I'd use ext2fs if I needed my Windows OS to access Linux for some reason, though. I remember it from a while ago. It's good if it's working and mature. Good on the developers since it's a nice tool to have.
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Q6600 Asus P5Q EVGA Geforce GTX 750 Kingston HyperX 4 x 2GB DDR2 800MHz 
OSPowerMouse Pad
Windows 7/Linux Corsair HX520W Antec 300 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Q6600 Asus P5Q EVGA Geforce GTX 750 Kingston HyperX 4 x 2GB DDR2 800MHz 
OSPowerMouse Pad
Windows 7/Linux Corsair HX520W Antec 300 
  hide details  
Reply
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by noobee View Post

NTFS-3G is included in the kernel - as part of the system.

doh.gif I don't even...
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrak View Post

doh.gif I don't even...
It uses the kernel module "fuse." It's what I meant... it's included in virtually every Linux OS as it's been stable for a while. Never have a problem with it.
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Q6600 Asus P5Q EVGA Geforce GTX 750 Kingston HyperX 4 x 2GB DDR2 800MHz 
OSPowerMouse Pad
Windows 7/Linux Corsair HX520W Antec 300 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Q6600 Asus P5Q EVGA Geforce GTX 750 Kingston HyperX 4 x 2GB DDR2 800MHz 
OSPowerMouse Pad
Windows 7/Linux Corsair HX520W Antec 300 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Linux, Unix
Overclock.net › Forums › Software, Programming and Coding › Operating Systems › Linux, Unix › What drive do I install Linux on for dual boot?