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How much does room temp matter. - Page 2

Poll Results: Run it to the basement

 
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    Yes
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post #11 of 21
TL;DR (make some nice paragraphs if you want people to read your post), post based on thread title:

Only delta T matters in heat transfer so room temp matters a lot. Without throttling or FAN speed increase, the temperature of all your components will increase by the same amount when you increase your room temp. (+10° room temp -> +10° CPU temp)
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post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sisaroth View Post

TL;DR (make some nice paragraphs if you want people to read your post), post based on thread title:

Only delta T matters in heat transfer so room temp matters a lot. Without throttling or FAN speed increase, the temperature of all your components will increase by the same amount when you increase your room temp. (+10° room temp -> +10° CPU temp)[

That' not even close to true, technogiant built a vapor chamber cooling with -40 temps, the highest overclock he got was somewhere in the realm of 40c core temps. You have to factor in heat density of the device being cooled, efficiency of the device cooling the component in that how fast does it remove the heat, relative delta temps, and the rate at which the median (air or water) is moving away from the device.

10c higher ambient might give you around 10c higher COOLANT temps, but it won't be exact, things just aren't linear. The higher coolant temp will make the CPU hotter, hotter silicon is less efficient at moving electricity which means more energy is lost as heat. That's just one factor, there are TONS in calculating heat transfer in the various parts of a liquid cooling loop.

The OPs purposed idea has been done, you could at least bother to read the last 3 posts.
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post #13 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prophet4NO1 View Post

I've seen water freeze in 4 inch pipe that was moving at 100,000 gallons per hour. Granted it was -30F in North Dakota. Fracking for oil in the winter sucks. lol
LOL. yeah it sounds it. Thankfully it never gets that cold here in NY, well not in my lifetime anyways.
post #14 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZytheEKS View Post

That' not even close to true, technogiant built a vapor chamber cooling with -40 temps, the highest overclock he got was somewhere in the realm of 40c core temps. You have to factor in heat density of the device being cooled, efficiency of the device cooling the component in that how fast does it remove the heat, relative delta temps, and the rate at which the median (air or water) is moving away from the device.

10c higher ambient might give you around 10c higher COOLANT temps, but it won't be exact, things just aren't linear. The higher coolant temp will make the CPU hotter, hotter silicon is less efficient at moving electricity which means more energy is lost as heat. That's just one factor, there are TONS in calculating heat transfer in the various parts of a liquid cooling loop.

The OPs purposed idea has been done, you could at least bother to read the last 3 posts.

=)..

Thanks for the information on the electricity , I didnt know that was the reason. It must be true though. When I just had a normal loop on top of my computer, running around 30c idle, and 60-80c 100 percent. I could never seem to get over 4.5ghz, I just got 4.7 with out trying to hard.
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by makasouleater69 View Post

=)..

Thanks for the information on the electricity , I didnt know that was the reason. It must be true though. When I just had a normal loop on top of my computer, running around 30c idle, and 60-80c 100 percent. I could never seem to get over 4.5ghz, I just got 4.7 with out trying to hard.

The silicon in the CPU cores is the culprit. As it heats up it's housing becomes more conductive, and looses more electricity to heat. The cooler it stays the less electricity it takes to complete the logic circuit, the less electricity it takes to complete the circuit the more cycles can be run on a set voltage. This is why you see subzero benchers pushing 8+GHz, you'd never be able to get anywhere near that without D-Ice, liquid nitrogen, or some really absurdly powerful phase change build,. The issue when trying to push those really high clocks is heat density. The die of your CPU is only about 2/5 of your CPU space, and the cores of your CPU which is the part the vast majority of the heat is generated in is only about a third of your die, so most of the heat from you CPU is generated in an immensely compact space.

By 2017 Intel plans on having 5nm transistors, and after that they supposedly plan on changing transistor material all together which makes sense, 5nm lines is about as small as I can see them realistically making it.
Edited by ZytheEKS - 4/25/14 at 10:41am
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The Laboratory
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post #16 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZytheEKS View Post

The silicon in the CPU cores is the culprit. As it heats up it's housing becomes more conductive, and looses more electricity to heat. The cooler it stays the less electricity it takes to complete the logic circuit, the less electricity it takes to complete the circuit the more cycles can be run on a set voltage. This is why you see subzero benchers pushing 8+GHz, you'd never be able to get anywhere near that without D-Ice, liquid nitrogen, or some really absurdly powerful phase change build,. The issue when trying to push those really high clocks is heat density. The die of your CPU is only about 2/5 of your CPU space, and the cores of your CPU which is the part the vast majority of the heat is generated in is only about a third of your die, so most of the heat from you CPU is generated in an immensely compact space.

By 2017 Intel plans on having 5nm transistors, and after that they supposedly plan on changing transistor material all together which makes sense, 5nm lines is about as small as I can see them realistically making it.
Thanks muchly. I am off then to see if i can get 5ghz lol.
post #17 of 21
Any pictures of the new setup? I'd love to see it.
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by makasouleater69 View Post

Thanks muchly. I am off then to see if i can get 5ghz lol.

5GHz isn't unrealistic for a good liquid loop, just hope you got a some good silicon on that chip. It really is a "Luck of the draw" type scenario. Some chips will have higher quality silicon than others.
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The Laboratory
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post #19 of 21
Thread Starter 
i could get pictures i suppose lol, its nothing special other than 2 40 foot red hoses going to my computer, and into my 1800s nasty basement lol. I have to check on it tomorrow, I will take some.
post #20 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nickcnse View Post

Any pictures of the new setup? I'd love to see it.




The hoses are air compressor hoses, I didnt want to pay 30 dollars per 50 foot of water hose, when they were 9.99. That other green hose, is hooked to my 290x water block, since I havent got it yet.

Also sadly I was only able to get to 4.7ghz. But that is 200 more than i had.
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