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[ET] IBM unveils Power8 and OpenPower pincer attack on Intel’s x86 server monopoly - Page 12

post #111 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABD EL HAMEED View Post


Ahh that explains a lot,Thanks.

Does anyone use assembly?if so why not just use C since it'd be much easier?

I'm taking x86 assembly right now and it's a pretty useless class. We use MASM and develop for the i386.

It's useful for understanding how a program actually works in memory and on the CPU but it's not very practical as far as writing programs. It does have its benefits for doing bit pushing (like when you want to create your own audio synthesizer that generates .wav files) that would otherwise be difficult in Java or C++.
post #112 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABD EL HAMEED View Post


Ahh that explains a lot,Thanks.

Does anyone use assembly?if so why not just use C since it'd be much easier?
C gets compiled in assembly (usually). The compiler generally does a better job at writing assembly than most humans.

There are some cases where a master level programmer might hand tweak assembly.

That being said... it is always good to know at least one level down of abstraction. A good C programmer should understand assembly.
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post #113 of 166
Quote:
The very first thing that the foundation had to do was create a reference server board that OpenPower Foundation members could use to build and test software. MacKean admitted that it looked a bit like “something you would get at Fry’s,” referring to the famous electronics chain headquartered in San Jose. MacKean said the reference board would have a lower cost than developers and system builders were used to seeing for something with as much performance as this board packs.



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post #114 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by IvantheDugtrio View Post

I'm taking x86 assembly right now and it's a pretty useless class. We use MASM and develop for the i386.

It's useful for understanding how a program actually works in memory and on the CPU but it's not very practical as far as writing programs. It does have its benefits for doing bit pushing (like when you want to create your own audio synthesizer that generates .wav files) that would otherwise be difficult in Java or C++.

Are you seriously calling assembly useless? Guess you don't do any kind of reverse engineering work or driver development... When I was messing with recreating LoadLibrary, I had to use ASM and hex arrays to build 32bit code in a x64 program. If I had wrote it in C the compiler would have messed up the cross compatibility that I was looking for. Yeah, ASM is so useless....
post #115 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by IvantheDugtrio View Post

I'm taking x86 assembly right now and it's a pretty useless class. We use MASM and develop for the i386.

It's useful for understanding how a program actually works in memory and on the CPU but it's not very practical as far as writing programs. It does have its benefits for doing bit pushing (like when you want to create your own audio synthesizer that generates .wav files) that would otherwise be difficult in Java or C++.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post

C gets compiled in assembly (usually). The compiler generally does a better job at writing assembly than most humans.

There are some cases where a master level programmer might hand tweak assembly.

That being said... it is always good to know at least one level down of abstraction. A good C programmer should understand assembly.

Ahh..so it's more about understanding how the hardware works rather than actually writing programs with it,thanks a lot for helping!

On topic now:how will they cool that chip?I mean these will be used for high end servers and supercomputers so watercooling isn't really an option,or is it?
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post #116 of 166
I believe Cool it have made an 1U liquid cooling solution for servers.

Besides, and decently designed heat sink tower should cool 250W no problem. All you need is a NHD15 with a much bigger base.
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post #117 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABD EL HAMEED View Post


Ahh..so it's more about understanding how the hardware works rather than actually writing programs with it,thanks a lot for helping!

On topic now:how will they cool that chip?I mean these will be used for high end servers and supercomputers so watercooling isn't really an option,or is it?

Most modern super computers have full water cooling systems. They were doing the whole full chopper pipe setup before the high performance PC people were.
post #118 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Madog View Post

Most modern super computers have full water cooling systems. They were doing the whole full chopper pipe setup before the high performance PC people were.

I've seen some pics of how supercomputer are cooled (using rooms that have pipes with water running through them in the walls to cool the air in the room and then that air is pushed via fans to the racks in which the boards and CPUs are with special types of heat sinks on them) but is it enough for this CPU?
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post #119 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLAWNOOB View Post

I believe Cool it have made an 1U liquid cooling solution for servers.

Besides, and decently designed heat sink tower should cool 250W no problem. All you need is a NHD15 with a much bigger base.

Yea, a NHD15 with like 15 heatpipes. tongue.gif
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post #120 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Pistol View Post

Yea, a NHD15 with like 15 heatpipes. tongue.gif

Current high end heatsink are pretty much rated for 300W max TDP (theoretical) which should be enough for this as long it isn't overclocked tongue.gif, a few samples being the Phanteks C14, HE01, and Noctua's high end models. Though likely see a beefy passive sink used on this thing since they're likely used in rack mounted chassis.
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