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Difference between Xeon E3-1200 v3 and 4th Gen Core-i3

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I'm looking to build a home NAS and currently leaning toward a Supermicro X10SLL-F board. I'll be using 4, 4TB drives at first and will likely add 2 more in the near future. The server will only be used by 4 people.

I'm assuming the i3 will be plenty of processor for a setup like this (please correct me if I'm wrong) and given that the 4th Gen i3 fully supports ECC, is there a reason to go with the Xeon I'm not aware of?

I don't have a problem spending the extra money on the Xeon but want to make sure it isn't a waste.

Any other suggestions would be great as well.


Thanks


Edit: Sorry, forgot to mention I'll be using FreeNAS.
Edited by ShoehornHands - 5/11/14 at 12:55pm
post #2 of 14
For a basis NAS the i3 will work fine.

An E3-1220v3 will have about 40% better performance then most of the i3's, so it'll be able to handle a heavier work load but with a standard NAS you should see much of a daily performance difference. The Xeon will also have a virtiualization options that the i3 doesn't support. So if you are just using the NAS as a Media or FTP server the i3 will work.
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Otitis View Post

For a basis NAS the i3 will work fine.

An E3-1220v3 will have about 40% better performance then most of the i3's, so it'll be able to handle a heavier work load but with a standard NAS you should see much of a daily performance difference. The Xeon will also have a virtiualization options that the i3 doesn't support. So if you are just using the NAS as a Media or FTP server the i3 will work.


Thanks for the info Otitis.

I figured the Xeon would be quite a bit faster. Data integrity is my main priority so I wanted to make sure the Xeon didn't have some additional features that improved reliability over the i3.

For example, I think some earlier versions of the i3 lack support for ECC memory. This would be a significant reason to go with the Xeon over the i3 but I'm pretty sure the Haswell i3 fully supports ECC.

As far as I know, ECC memory is really the only feature that enhances reliability but as I said, I wanted to make sure I wasn't missing something.

Anyway, thanks again for clearing that up for me.
post #4 of 14
The Haswell-based Pentium CPUs also support ECC. I just put a system together with the SuperMicro X10-SL7-F-O + Pentium G3220 running FreeNAS (6x 2TB drives atm, upgrading to 12 at some point) and it works really well.

Was originally considering the same mobo/CPU combo as you, but the G3220 is $65, which allowed me to spend more on the motherboard and get the X10-SL7 which has a built-in LSi SAS controller, giving you 15 SATA ports. Might be something to look into if you think you'll be adding more hard drives in the future.
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkcloud89 View Post

The Haswell-based Pentium CPUs also support ECC. I just put a system together with the SuperMicro X10-SL7-F-O + Pentium G3220 running FreeNAS (6x 2TB drives atm, upgrading to 12 at some point) and it works really well.

Was originally considering the same mobo/CPU combo as you, but the G3220 is $65, which allowed me to spend more on the motherboard and get the X10-SL7 which has a built-in LSi SAS controller, giving you 15 SATA ports. Might be something to look into if you think you'll be adding more hard drives in the future.

Thanks darkcloud89, I actually wasn't aware the Pentiums supported ECC so that might be an even better option than the i3.

If you don't mind me asking, are you using ZFS or UFS? I know ZFS is quite a bit more demanding in terms of memory but I'd be curious to know if that G3220 would provide sufficient CPU power.

I actually did see that motherboard but figured it would be overkill for my needs as I don't see myself using more than 6 drives.

Anyway, thanks again for the heads up regarding the CPU and your system info. I'm pretty new to freeNAS so it's nice to get confirmation that a similar system is up and running great.
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShoehornHands View Post

If you don't mind me asking, are you using ZFS or UFS? I know ZFS is quite a bit more demanding in terms of memory but I'd be curious to know if that G3220 would provide sufficient CPU power.

I am using ZFS in my system. The G3220 doesn't have any problems keeping up with everything, even while serving multiple clients over SMB/CIFS. The transfers are capped by the network well before the CPU starts to make a difference.
post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkcloud89 View Post

I am using ZFS in my system. The G3220 doesn't have any problems keeping up with everything, even while serving multiple clients over SMB/CIFS. The transfers are capped by the network well before the CPU starts to make a difference.

Awesome, that's great to know. I'm thinking I'll just go with the Pentium then and save a few bucks.
post #8 of 14
If you have any virtualization ambitions might as well go xeon and passthrough then can run a full esxi setup with freenas virtual. But if running on bare metal then i3 is fine

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post #9 of 14
Not to hijack but I am looking into virtualization right now a bit. Considering building myself a machine strictly for lab purposes. I don't know what to look for really, what makes a Xeon / Opteron better than a regular consumer part?

Will likely use Xen if that matters. Prefer to keep it open sourced.
Edited by Tadaen Sylvermane - 5/14/14 at 11:33pm
 
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post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tadaen Sylvermane View Post

Not to hijack but I am looking into virtualization right now a bit. Considering building myself a machine strictly for lab purposes. I don't know what to look for really, what makes a Xeon / Opteron better than a regular consumer part?

The biggest difference is that the Opteron/Xeon processors allow you to use ECC RAM, and the platforms that they are on typically allow you to install more RAM than the consumer-focused parts (most of which are limited to 32GB). If it's just being used for home/testing/fun, you can definitely get away with going for the regular desktop parts. I have an FX-6300 w/ 32GB RAM as my lab machine and it works pretty nicely.
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