Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Memory › The answer on Google and OCN!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The answer on Google and OCN!

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
DRAM Reference Voltage, or I have been seeing it called Termination Voltage as well for the X58 chipset

My board is the Asus P6t Deluxe V2 and I am trying to get the most out of the memory that I can, now the auto setting for these voltz are what everyone says to leave at and that is a multi of 50% or 0.500 voltz UNLESS you are having stability issues.

OK now here in lies the prob I am running into, which way is what lol, is more better to gain stability (say 60% or 0.600?) or is less (40% or 0.400?) these numbers are just numbers I used for topic sake.

I have read everything I could get my hands on about these settings, and I have read the Understanding Voltage Article, which while informative explains nothing about what these voltage settings do!

I have also read just about everyone's question about these settings as well, and from the best respected forums out there including OCN not one person gets a straight forward answer, only leave at 50% UNLESS you are having stability issues, then nothing!

Can someone smarter than me (shouldn't be hard to find lol) PLEASE explain what these setting really do, and how you can tell which Channel or Lane (I.E.= Channel A, B, C, ) is the one you would need to adjust and how can you tell if Data Voltage is needed or less is needed vs Control Voltage is needed or less is needed.

Please read my questions fully before you answer as I stink at spelling and grammar, and have a google just as you do, so trust me unless I have not thought of the right thing to search I have read it. As far as I can tell not one person has ever received the answer to this other than leave it on auto lol, come on um OCN we mess with stuff lol, someone has to know this Chinese secret, pass it on master grasshopper is ready lol, ok I am a bit slap happy tired lol, but please help

Thank You OCN Members
post #2 of 7
A little background:
The main component (the part that does the actual remembering) of memory sticks are called ICs. They're the small, black squares under the heat sinks (see pic). They are made up of thousands of capacitors. Capacitors can be charged with electricity and discharged. Bits and bytes are stored in memory as charged / uncharged capacitors. In computer speak, a charged capacitor is a 1 and a discharged capacitor is a 0.

Unfortunately, a charged capacitor will not hold its charge indefinitely. They "leak" and eventually loose their charge. In computer memory this "leak" happens in nano-seconds. (a nano-second is 1/1,000,000,000 of a second). When one or more memory capacitors loose their charge the bits and bytes get corrupted and "bad data" ensues resulting in all kinds of "bad stuff" - corrupted data, BSODs, etc..

One way to make a capacitor hold its charge longer is to put more charge into it. That's what increasing memory voltage does. Another way is to recharge the capacitors with the data again. All computers do this automatically. Fortunately we can control how often this recharging is done. If it's not soon enough data gets corrupted. If it's to often the computer wastes time recharging capacitors that don't yet need recharging and performance suffers. This memory timing is called tREF and can be adjusted for optimum stability/performance.

I hope this helps.........

My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
  hide details  
Reply
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
Well it did not answer my question but was very interesting, I really never looked at memory like the way you explained it , and it makes more sense now why we add volts or tighten or loosen timings, I now understand why when I have tested my RAM via memtest86 and get no errors but still BSOD later on in windows due to RAM issues. While it might be stable dose not mean it can't kick out a corrupt bit of data from being too stable so to speak (looser Timings) so Thank you for teaching me that part!

I still would love to understand my original questions, but I have to say if every response is as informative as yours I will be the better for it!
post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradford1040 View Post

DRAM Reference Voltage,

From reading the owner's manual it appears to be the ability to set the voltage for each memory stick independently, by using a multiple ( Multi?) of the main memory voltage set in the bios.

Have you tried asking your question on the Asus Forum for your motherboard?
My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
  hide details  
Reply
post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by billbartuska View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradford1040 View Post

DRAM Reference Voltage,

From reading the owner's manual it appears to be the ability to set the voltage for each memory stick independently, by using a multiple ( Multi?) of the main memory voltage set in the bios.

Have you tried asking your question on the Asus Forum for your motherboard?

NO as it is not only a Asus setting, seen these same settings on Gigabyte boards and MSI boards, but main reason is I have never had any luck finding anyone on there forum that was even half as knowledgeable as even the dumbest person here on OCN lol, hope that sounds right!

I don't understand why no one knows anything about these settings or am I not explaining myself on which ones they are, well here is a TurboV screen shot of the ones I mean
post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 
I am still having a issue finding the right info, I know that somethings are just not answerable but doubt that a voltage setting on so many boards has ever gone unused and just would maybe like to get responses about how you used this to help or make things worst stories instead of a definitive answer on what it dose!
post #7 of 7
A simplistic answer:
CPUs are basically transistors chained together.
A transistor is basically an "electric gate".
Current applied / not applied opens / closes the gate.
It takes a finite amount of "power" to open/close the gate.
Power is voltage over time
If there's less time to apply this power (ie faster clock ticks) then it takes more voltage to open / close the gate.

Which then takes us to the "horror stories":




When "wires" get extremely small a phenomenon called "electron migration" starts to occur.
The "wires" in a CPU are only a few molecules of material wide.
Current flowing through such small wires actually causes molecules to be blown off the wire.
When this happens, the site with the missing molecule(s) becomes more resistive.
When it becomes more resistive, more heat is generated.
Eventually, if too many molecules are removed, so much heat is generated that the CPU will overheat and shut down.
If the CPU is run at it's "specified" voltage, electron migration will be so slow that a lifetime of 30-50 years is a reasonable expectation.
On the other hand, extreme voltages can render a CPU useless in minutes.

...this thread should be stickied!
Edited by billbartuska - 5/25/14 at 3:20am
My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Memory
Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Memory › The answer on Google and OCN!