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Using the rad from an A/C unit - Page 2

post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gothic-Yoshi View Post

The evaporators and condensers in air conditioning systems are always made of aluminium, so you shouldn't use them in a water loop with copper blocks (95% of waterblocks). You will get galvanic corrosion and that is not good. But a full copper heater core from an old car is great, used them myself thumb.gif

i'm pretty sure that the TUBES in evaps & condensers are COPPER.... teh fins are almost always ALU.. but that doesn't matter at all since they are not in contact with the liquid in the loop




For a repurposed A/C... lookie here : http://www.overclockers.com/forums/showthread.php?t=749574
post #12 of 17
Just some insight from someone who works with air conditioning on a daily basis and I have a few years behind me.

1. Make sure you clean the inside of the coil with plenty of greaser, then water, and a ton of it. The oil used in A/C becomes acidic with moisture (water).
2. The core is copper, the fins aluminium, no worries about corrosion.
3. The fins on A/C is usually split finned and interweaves, so it becomes very restrictive on fans, I doubt ANY 12v fan will actually get decent air flow across them. Look more 240v fans (or what ever your mains runs at)
4. Try it passive, the huge amount of surface area may just be enough.


P.s. I have been known to be wrong in the past, so if I am wrong please educate me as well.
post #13 of 17
I use to be a radiator engineer. Now doing something else.

You can't say definitively whether a tube or fine or tank or fitting is copper or aluminum as a generalization.

Now days we typically will make an all aluminum radiator. Meaning the core is an aluminum alloy with whatever additive metals.

Old school copper radiators usually made with copper fins, and copper tubes, and brass alloy tanks.

Very rarely will you see a radiator with aluminum fins and copper tubes. It usually comes down to the brazing and oven process.


So I second the motion to find a all copper heater core! probably the best bang for your buck and with efficiency.
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by acidlaser View Post

So I second the motion to find a all copper heater core! probably the best bang for your buck and with efficiency.
Old school watercoolers would know about heatercores. thumb.gif

There use to be lists of which ones to get....
Once again...
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 920 [4.28GHz, HT] Asus P6T + Broadcom NetXtreme II VisionTek HD5850 [900/1200] + Galaxy GT240 2x4GB G.Skill Ripjaw X [1632 MHz] 
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Intel X25-M 160GB + 3xRAID0 500GB 7200.12 Window 7 Pro 64 Acer H243H + Samsung 226BW XARMOR-U9BL  
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Once again...
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 920 [4.28GHz, HT] Asus P6T + Broadcom NetXtreme II VisionTek HD5850 [900/1200] + Galaxy GT240 2x4GB G.Skill Ripjaw X [1632 MHz] 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
Intel X25-M 160GB + 3xRAID0 500GB 7200.12 Window 7 Pro 64 Acer H243H + Samsung 226BW XARMOR-U9BL  
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Antec Truepower New 750W Li Lian PC-V2100 [10x120mm fans] Logitech G9 X-Trac Pro 
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post #15 of 17
Bonneville 77' heatercore fit 2x120mm perfectly.
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by acidlaser View Post

I use to be a radiator engineer. Now doing something else.

You can't say definitively whether a tube or fine or tank or fitting is copper or aluminum as a generalization.

Now days we typically will make an all aluminum radiator. Meaning the core is an aluminum alloy with whatever additive metals.

Old school copper radiators usually made with copper fins, and copper tubes, and brass alloy tanks.

Very rarely will you see a radiator with aluminum fins and copper tubes. It usually comes down to the brazing and oven process.


So I second the motion to find a all copper heater core! probably the best bang for your buck and with efficiency.

Are we on the same page?

All DX air conditioning coils in Australia for the past 40 years or so have been copper tube with aluminum fins. Frigpol, APAC (the same company), Lennox, Fujitsu, Daikin etc etc.

If you need proof I can provide it as well.

The only places I have seen copper tube copper finned coils is in the hospital morgue and on a jetty/pier for a refinery hut, due to the salt.
post #17 of 17
Haha, I believe you.

That's interesting and new to me.

Copper in copper more popular now and still in Heavy machinery and tractor applications...

Granted I'm in america....

If you want to talk more about it msg me.
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