Overclock.net › Forums › Cooling › Water Cooling › Submit your ideas for a custom reservoir!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Submit your ideas for a custom reservoir!

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
Making a custom reservoir for my Ultimate Desk Build: http://www.overclock.net/t/1518955/build-log-socks-ultimate-water-desk-a-fully-custom-built-desk-with-built-in-pc-case-and-radiator-box

Here is what I'm thinking


Or doing the entire desktop itself as the reservoir.

however, It's completely open so if anyone has a cool idea for a reservoir I'd love to hear it. Will be doing it this weekend.

Obviously it will be an external reservoir, and it will basically act as the centerpiece for the build, so the limitations are, there are no limitations...

Help me out making a kick-ass build.

*note, the weekend is the limit because my brother-in-law who is extremely crafty (makes crap like custom dining room tables out of tree stumps, and welding old junk into cool looking lawn art as a second form of income) is gonna be helping me out this weekend. So while I got the skilled help, gonna put it to good use.
Edited by DNMock - 10/20/14 at 12:25pm
post #2 of 24
Things to think about and decide:

Material(s) of construction.
Basically, brass or plastic (acrylic?, Lexan? etc.)

How to attach then together
If brass, brazing? "O" rings and bolts?.
If plastic, solvent weld?

Mounting/attaching?

Fittings? Barbs? Compression fittings?
And threading the holes?

Something like this?


Here's a cutaway of a "simple" one I made from 3" Acrylic tube.






I wouldn't count on your first build to be successful. It will likely take some experimentation.
Edited by billbartuska - 10/20/14 at 6:28pm
My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
  hide details  
Reply
post #3 of 24
Thread Starter 
Since you have done this before, any tips or pointers would be greatly appreciated!

Should have included a bit more info in my post:

Using .22 inch thick Acrylic (solvent welding)

Tapping in the g 1/4" thread for the compression fitting.

For a base, a 1" x 4" board notched to length and bolted down to the desk itself with an epoxy waterproofed glue connecting the base and tank.

I already have two sheets of .22" thick 30 x 36 inch sheets, the solvent weld, silicone, glue, 1/4th inch tap out set, compression fittings, tubing etc. etc.

However, I'm actively searching for good ideas. Aside from intricate etchings into the side, or smelting copper and pouring it into a form or anything way over the top like that, everything is on the table so to speak.

As far as planning to fail, this is my first time doing a project like this, but it's not my first large scale project. Half the fun of a new project like this is failing, finding the error and correcting it.

edit: Yes, that top image is almost exactly what my original idea is, except having dual inlet and outlet slots.
Edited by DNMock - 10/20/14 at 10:01pm
post #4 of 24
You could make steps inside the res, then have the inlet at the top, and have the outlet at the bottom. It would make a waterfall effect, assuming you don't fill it all the way up.
SUPERPWN
(12 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i5 4670K Asus z87-Pro MSI GTX 1080 Aero 32GB DDR3 Gskill Ripjaws 
Hard DriveOSMonitorMonitor
4TB Seagate Windows 8 x64 Overlord x270 OC HP ZR27 
MonitorKeyboardPowerAudio
Asus PG279Q G-Tune Topre Realforce 800w Yulong D100 DAC with Denon D7000 headphones 
  hide details  
Reply
SUPERPWN
(12 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i5 4670K Asus z87-Pro MSI GTX 1080 Aero 32GB DDR3 Gskill Ripjaws 
Hard DriveOSMonitorMonitor
4TB Seagate Windows 8 x64 Overlord x270 OC HP ZR27 
MonitorKeyboardPowerAudio
Asus PG279Q G-Tune Topre Realforce 800w Yulong D100 DAC with Denon D7000 headphones 
  hide details  
Reply
post #5 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by DNMock View Post

Since you have done this before, any tips or pointers would be greatly appreciated!

Should have included a bit more info in my post:

Using .22 inch thick Acrylic (solvent welding)
Getting true, square cuts is difficult. A table saw with a 60 tooth carbide blade works, but you have to polish out all the cut marks and then there's the possibility of making the cut wavy. A draw file works, then a buffing wheel with plastic polishing compound.

Tapping in the g 1/4" thread for the compression fitting.
Acrylic tends to stress crack over time. Thread to tight - cracking, to loose - leaks.
I've used "O" ringed, bulk head fittings with success, but had to machine in the "O" ring grooves on a lathe. You could get away with neoprene gaskets though.



For a base, a 1" x 4" board notched to length and bolted down to the desk itself with an epoxy waterproofed glue connecting the base and tank.
Epoxies, even JBWeld, doesn't stick well to plastic. Surface is to smooth and the plasticizers in the plastic leach out and the bond weakens. I've found Silicone calk more effective than epoxies. J Not as strong, but if you don't need the strength they're fine.

I already have two sheets of .22" thick 30 x 36 inch sheets, the solvent weld, silicone, glue, 1/4th inch tap out set, compression fittings, tubing etc. etc.
1/4" tap? What's the ID of the fittings? 1/8"? If so, 1/8" ID will absolutely kill flow rates. I use a 3/4" tap with 1/2" ID fittings (and tubing).

However, I'm actively searching for good ideas. Aside from intricate etchings into the side, or smelting copper and pouring it into a form or anything way over the top like that, everything is on the table so to speak.

As far as planning to fail, this is my first time doing a project like this, but it's not my first large scale project. Half the fun of a new project like this is failing, finding the error and correcting it.
Oh yeah! Plenty of "fun" on the way.

edit: Yes, that top image is almost exactly what my original idea is, except having dual inlet and outlet slots.

The drawing was just to see if we were on the same page.
My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
  hide details  
Reply
post #6 of 24
Oh, you might want to consider glass. They do some nice fish tanks with ti.
Perhaps some of the aquarium forums have info on construction methods.
My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
  hide details  
Reply
post #7 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Getting true, square cuts is difficult. A table saw with a 60 tooth carbide blade works, but you have to polish out all the cut marks and then there's the possibility of making the cut wavy. A draw file works, then a buffing wheel with plastic polishing compound.

The table saw I've been using has a large metal T-square on it, so the cuts will hopefully be fairly straight, on a side note though, the cuts are almost perfect on a full sheet right? Since size isn't an issue I could just pick up a couple smaller sheets and use that as the main two sides. Then it's just the base, top and bottom thinner pieces and I can even have over hang on those sides.
Quote:
Acrylic tends to stress crack over time. Thread to tight - cracking, to loose - leaks.
I've used "O" ringed, bulk head fittings with success, but had to machine in the "O" ring grooves on a lathe. You could get away with neoprene gaskets though.

That's a great idea, thanks. I think I'll do that.
Quote:
1/4" tap? What's the ID of the fittings? 1/8"? If so, 1/8" ID will absolutely kill flow rates. I use a 3/4" tap with 1/2" ID fittings (and tubing).

Planned on using the same fittings that go on the radiators, blocks, and pumps, which is the 1/4" threaded fittings. my tubing is 1/2 ID 3/4 OD. These are what I was going to use http://www.frozencpu.com/products/21756/ex-tub-2194/Bitspower_G14_Thread_12_ID_x_34_OD_Compression_Fitting_-_Carbon_Black_BP-CBCPF-CC5.html?tl=g30c409s1609

Is that not a good idea?
Quote:
Oh, you might want to consider glass. They do some nice fish tanks with ti.
Perhaps some of the aquarium forums have info on construction methods.

Good call, looking into that now.
Quote:
You could make steps inside the res, then have the inlet at the top, and have the outlet at the bottom. It would make a waterfall effect, assuming you don't fill it all the way up.

like this?

post #8 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by DNMock View Post

Planned on using the same fittings that go on the radiators, blocks, and pumps, which is the 1/4" threaded fittings. my tubing is 1/2 ID 3/4 OD. These are what I was going to use http://www.frozencpu.com/products/21756/ex-tub-2194/Bitspower_G14_Thread_12_ID_x_34_OD_Compression_Fitting_-_Carbon_Black_BP-CBCPF-CC5.html?tl=g30c409s1609

Is that not a good idea?
Not really. Why would you reduce down from tubing with a 1/2" ID to run through a hole with an ID smaller than 1/4"? I know people do it, but it just doesn't make any sense to me.

My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
  hide details  
Reply
post #9 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by billbartuska View Post

Not really. Why would you reduce down from tubing with a 1/2" ID to run through a hole with an ID smaller than 1/4"? I know people do it, but it just doesn't make any sense to me.


The fitting is G1/4, not 1/4".

Side note: the '1/4' in a G1/4 fitting was originally based on the inner diameter (measured in fractional inches) of a steel tube for which the thread was intended, but contemporary pipes tend to use thinner walls to save material, and thus have an inner diameter larger than this nominal size. (H/T to WiSK for that tidbit)

The fitting's ID is 0.38 to 0.39" (the IDs on Bitspower fittings vary a little), roughly equal to 3/8" (0.375"). Other brands and types of G1/4 fitting IDs range from 0.34" to 0.39".
Edited by Unicr0nhunter - 10/21/14 at 11:53am
post #10 of 24
Here is a different idea, not sure how practical it would be, or how easy it would be to make, but ...

Since you are using to 1080 radiators, why not make the reservoir SURROUND the radiators and take up the the majority of the front of your desks legs? You could then back light the whole thing and have water "glow" and see light come through a little on the radiator and fans.




You could do this on just one "leg" (either the front and back, or front and side, or side and side) or do the fronts on both "legs" (ie the cubes you already have) and just have mesh on the back side to allow for air to escape from the back from the fans on the 1080 radiator.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Water Cooling
Overclock.net › Forums › Cooling › Water Cooling › Submit your ideas for a custom reservoir!