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Dagamus NM Build log and product reviews

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 
Hi everybody, I have been collecting parts, taking pictures, and tinkering for quite some time in preparation of writing something up while side lined post foot surgery. I also got new cameras and lenses so I am learning what I can do with them, hence lots of pictures.

We are basing the build around an asus rampage iv extreme motherboard, Intel 4930k, and four Asus GTX 780TI's.

In the time it took to collect parts for this build it seems that there has been a lot of new hardware released making this obsolete but there are a few things I am waiting for before moving to new hardware. Yes the 980's are out for NVidia, but I won't move away from the 780ti until the 980ti comes out. 5960x processor is super sweet but will hold out until the second release of these processors. DDR4 is still stupidly expensive. Really high CAS latency for speeds not all that much higher than DDR3. I thought I paid a lot for my G.Skill 64Gb 2133 set, but 64Gb of DDR4 2133 costs way more and has CL 15 instead of CL11 in what I have.

So without further ado, lets see where we are. We are working in a Haf Stacker. More info about this case can be found at the Official HAF Stacker Owners Club






I was toying with how the 915 section looks with 200mm and 140mm case fans

This case might not be the height of aesthetics, but it is a pretty neat platform. Here are some more pics I took with my old camera and junk lens. After my disappointment in the images produced by the old kit lens I decided to get a canon 100mm USM IS f/2.8L Macro lens. After using that lens and enjoying the results with my Canon 1100D I got a 6D for work and picked up a used 50D from ebay and installed magic lantern on both of them (super sweet if you have a canon camera, magic lantern unlocks features only found on much more expensive cameras than what you have). I also got a new zoom 24-105mm USM IS f/4L.

Canon 100mm Macro $949 @Amazon

Canon 24-105mm zoom $1149 @Amazon

Canon 6D $1799 @Amazon

So here we go with some shots from the new lens:

My Steinel HG2510 ESD Heatgun. $241.60. @Amazon

This thing is awesome, You have push button programming for both temperature and fan speed. Temperature is in 10° F increments all the way up to 1200° F and the fan speed in pie wedges in a chart. Being ESD safe you can work around your electronics without spraying them with electrons smile.gif It must have a collection electrode in the nozzle.

It is very solid weighing in at 2.3 pounds, receives easy extensions for tube bending and shrinking around sleeving. The heft comes from the ceramic encapsulated heating element, but the rest isn't cheap plastic. the body has durable tactile plastic around metal construction, it disassembles easily and requires little maintenance other than periodically cleaning the intake filter if it gets full of lint. This heatgun has a cool down program for things that need to cool slowly and four programmable memory settings so you can have soldering, sleeving, tube bending, another size of tubing etc.



Ok, back to the project, let's look at what else is powering this build:

I bought a second Asus Rampage IV Extreme (RIVE) off of eBay for $103 in a for parts condition. It had a few bent pins from some genius trying to put their CPU in incorrectly. I straightened the pins and tested that it worked and all flying colors. This put me into the position of figuring out what to do with it and I decided I would like to run a 4930k in addition to my 3930k (5960x still quite a ways out).



I decided on a pair of Intel 730 series 480GB SSD's. (This is one area that the 5960x and RVE has advantage, can run OS on 4 drive raid) I like the technology behind these, not the cheapest, not the fastest, not the biggest, but they are the most reliable. Enterprise data-center technology released by Intel in an enthusiast package. While the skull is not my cup of tea, I recognize that the purpose of it is to keep enthusiast products in the enthusiast market. These are far cheaper than what would be found in data centers so the skull is most likely a deterrent to these being used in the business setting. These vary in price between $240 and $400 @Newegg






As mentioned earlier, the RAM is G.Skill 64GB 2133MHz 1.5V CL 11 with two dual fan coolers $669 @Newegg

This is my second set of this RAM, I thought about going to 2400MHz but that would require going to 1.65V. I know that the Ivy bridge memory controller is supposed to be a bit more robust than the IMC of the sandy bridge 3930K CPU. I found that the 3930K could handle the 64GB's of 2133MHz set to profile #2 and I could get the CPU up to 4.9GHz stable but any changes at all to any memory setting would cause crashing. As this works very well I decided to stay in familiar territory instead of risking instability by overvolting the IMC at 1.65V

I would have gone with the Asus ROG 780ti matrix x4 but they went on backorder at newegg and never came back so I went with the next best ASUS DirectCUII OC 780 TI. These are built for overvolting and while I will not be going sub-ambient any time soon, there should still be plenty of potential to unlock while under water.

I will go through the process of hotwiring them to the RIVE Mobo in some detail later in this build. I piced these up for $499 each @Newegg.

The last major remaining (non-cooling) components are the PSU and UPS. The PSU is the Enermax Platimax EPM1350EWT 1350W platinum plus rated beast for $309.99 @Newegg. The number of eggs rating at Newegg is surprising, but I guess there was a bad batch of these released. The complaints were all DOA and Enermax and Newegg replaced them all right away and without question. The one less than stellar review that resonated with me was the one about the cables being too short. For my purposes this will not be an issue, but this is something to consider. I will most likely be shortening many of these cables and I will re-sleeve it. The sleeving that comes with it is pretty ugly and very very stiff.

Other than that I absolutely love this PSU. I have a rosewill 1300W (god it is ugly, but it works well) and an EVGA 1000W Supernova P2 80 plus platinum and I must say that the Enermax produces the cleanest power resulting in far less crashes when pulling over the max rating or near it for a long time. For future builds I will only use Enermax unless I am building for somebody else or the project has a sponsored PSU to use.

The UPS might not be considered a component, but for this build it is absolutely critical. When video is encoding, rendering, or performing any other time intensive tasks it is not acceptable to have power become unstable or go out completely. As I will have the four GPU's crunching away at video renders, the power consumption stays high. As such a high powered UPS is needed, enter the Cyberpower OR2200LCDRTXL2U 1650W UPS. After my computer I still have 300W headroom. That covers all of the peripherals and monitors. Sound will have to be on a separate circuit (LOL). This thing does everything it is supposed to and has no fluff. The price fluctuates up and down by about 15% from where it is now at $506.99 @Newegg.

Currently there is a EK Supremacy block on the CPU but that is just for testing purposes. This build has a Supremacy Evo Elite in Nickel which means that we will give the Indigo Xtreme a shot. This block is currently $128.99. @FCPU

There is not much more to say about this as I will not be able to run the heating procedure on the indigo xtreme until this computer is up and running and there is a long way to go.

The pump for one of the loops is a black swiftech MCP35X2 with heatsink and an EK 200mL tube res.I haven't figured out yet what I want to do for the second loop.I am running a second loop as I want the fluid velocity lower in my chipset and RAM blocks lower than in my CPU/GPU loop. I have an aquacomputer setup that would be good for a second, I just need to figure out how to get it into the case.

The big piece is the Aquacomputer Airplex Modularity System 420 Radiator / Pump / Reservoir Combo with Copper Fins and an Eheim Compact 600/12V Pump Which can be had for $359.99.

I have heard of people complaining about packaging so So let's unbox this stuff:
This cardboard box was placed inside the main FrozenCPU box and had plenty of insulating paper.

Out of the box and on the table everything looked nice and straight. The plastic used as end tanks is interesting, it is very high quality and I hope it holds up well to the dry desert Southwest.






Here we see the electrical connections (more about these later) and the water pump (again, for the chipset, mosfets, and ram so not mission critical like the rest otherwise I would have gone D5)





The dimensions are given in the product listing page linked above, what they don't show is how deep does each side sit and what fan thickness will be needed for it to sit flush.

On the non pump side, the depth is found to be 25mm confirmed with a tire tred depth gauge.



The pump is just a bit thicker than 25mm so the total thickness is right at about 30mm. I will but fans of whichever thickness when I figure out how this part goes in my chassis.



In addition to the ACQ 2nd loop, we added an aquero 6 XT with the little remote control for it. $224.99



The box is generic and marked the same as the aquaero 5, but the little label on the side shows that the box does contain the 6 XT.



In the box we find the User's guide, the actual computer, 4x 28" temp probes, 1x 40" 5 pin USB cable, an aquabus speed signal cable, miscellaneous mounting material and the remote keyboard.




Here is a closeup of the temp probe. I was messing with the autofocus on my camera and got this shot.


To complement the aquero I picked up three high flow USB sensors. These have a plastic wheel sensor inside of them with long free moving vanes.


Again the box is generic but the label confirms the product

Everything is packaged well, the unit itself is tightly wrapped in pink bubble foam stuff. Included is a 20" sleeved aquabus cable and a 38" sleeved USB header cable

The front of the unit has four connections, A two pin temp sensor (the same type that is on the aquaero itself. Might get used, might not; it just depends on the length of the temp sensor) A three pin alarm header for hooking up to a speaker, mobo, or several other configs. A four pin aquabus header for connecting to the system as well as a five pin USB header.

A shot straight trough the sensor so that you can see the vane for the wheel. The openings are G1/4"


In the 915 section we have 1 400mm and 2 200mm phobya radiators. I wanted more 400s but it seems they were nowhere to be found at the time of purchase so I had to settle for two 200mm's. With the three rads I can fit 9 200mm bitfenix fans into the box and still have space for rigid tubing. If I would have had two 400mm rads I would have the same amount of fans, one less piece of tubing, and a slightly more convenient return for cool fluid.

The Bitfenix fans are great, very quiet and produce a decent amount of static pressure at the radiator. $15.99 @FCPU




While I wish that there had been a 400mm version 2 when I bought this stuff, there was not. I had a 400mm not needed anymore from a different project.

In this box there is one 400mm version 1 and two 200mm version 2's.

You can see that there is a difference in thickness between the v.1 and v.2, there is an 85mm thick version but I did not go with it. The 200mm can be had for $79.99 @FCPU

Edited by Dagamus NM - 12/22/14 at 3:33pm
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post #2 of 3
Thread Starter 
Let us use the heatgun to prep the ram for waterblocks. I know people say that waterblocks are pointless on RAM, but as I use my computer for video editing and rendering the ram gets hot enough to artifact and also too hot to touch. I don't like dealing with this in the middle of long projects so I will just add blocks into the loop. This kit is the 64GB 2133MHz kit that comes with two blue LED case fans. At $699 it isn't cheap, but far cheaper than the 64GB kit of 2133MHz DDR4 @$1099.99 and CL 15.
Lets prep the ram for EK blocks:







Setting the heat at 400°F should make you not need to worry about popping chips off, just get it nice and warm and use the circlip pliers to get the heat spreader apart. Take time here and do it right. Popping off a memory chip would really suck and the g.skill adhesive for the heat spreader is plenty strong enough to do it.Lift, separate, move down, repeat. It gets tedious going through 8 sticks, but I had my two year old son climbing my leg and my wife asking questions about dinner to spice things up.
Edited by Dagamus NM - 12/24/14 at 7:56pm
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post #3 of 3
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Well this is starting to go all over the place. So much to do with so little time.

I may poach parts of this build for some of my others as well as add some. I have had so much come in since the last update.

What is better than a 5960X?

This





Edited by Dagamus NM - 4/7/15 at 1:27pm
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