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Finalmouse 2015 - Page 422

post #4211 of 4669
Where is Nilizum at? He seems to know the optimal sensor position based on the shape of the mouse. For the classic ergo, I believe he said it was 2-3mm below what it should be.
post #4212 of 4669
There is actually no benefit of having sensor positioning too far upfront.. I have tested it with modded mice and sensor position is mostly something that you get used to.. Having it too far up will make your wrist aiming less accurate and having it too far back will suppress the are of movement you can do purely with your wrist..

It has a huge impact on your recoil control because 99% of us are using wrist muscle-memory for that..
post #4213 of 4669
Quote:
Originally Posted by trism View Post

But why? It already looks to be quite high up in the Tournament Pro considering it has a wide butt.

Probably because the sensor is much smaller and there is no point of making an over-sized PCB.

Quote:
Originally Posted by reddy89 View Post

Where is Nilizum at? He seems to know the optimal sensor position based on the shape of the mouse. For the classic ergo, I believe he said it was 2-3mm below what it should be.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonagold View Post

There is actually no benefit of having sensor positioning too far upfront.. I have tested it with modded mice and sensor position is mostly something that you get used to.. Having it too far up will make your wrist aiming less accurate and having it too far back will suppress the are of movement you can do purely with your wrist..

It has a huge impact on your recoil control because 99% of us are using wrist muscle-memory for that..

Isn't his suggestion purely based off a theory he has?

I rather have the sensor as far forward as the sensor being used allows. There is less movement necessary this way, which means it's faster and reduces effort throughout your play session. You can utilize more of your wrist for more consistent tracking.

http://esreality.com/post/2410040/new-gaming-mice-vps-invention-and-more

I think it's much more beneficial, in a game like GO, to have the sensor far forward. Targets are very small and players strafe constantly. The lower your sensitivity the more effort and speed is required. You might start to move your mouse to fast to properly control it when players are strafing constantly. Flick shots are much easier when you use your wrist, the same goes for controlling the recoil. Small corrections after a flick is easier when you just have to nudge the mouse a tiny distance.
post #4214 of 4669
Quote:
Originally Posted by popups View Post

I think it's much more beneficial, in a game like GO, to have the sensor far forward. Targets are very small and players strafe constantly. The lower your sensitivity the more effort and speed is required. You might start to move your mouse to fast to properly control it when players are strafing constantly. Flick shots are much easier when you use your wrist, the same goes for controlling the recoil. Small corrections after a flick is easier when you just have to nudge the mouse a tiny distance.
I heavily disagree. The higher the sensor is, the more disconnected it feels for me in-game. FK and KPM both feel this way. I have to use a lower sensitivity with those mice to feel as precise.
post #4215 of 4669
Quote:
Originally Posted by trism View Post

I heavily disagree. The higher the sensor is, the more disconnected it feels for me in-game. FK and KPM both feel this way. I have to use a lower sensitivity with those mice to feel as precise.

That's due to your habits and physical limitations.
Edited by popups - 2/2/16 at 3:43am
post #4216 of 4669
Quote:
Originally Posted by popups View Post

That's down to your habits and physical limitations.
Just as your explanation is. I use both arm and the wrist to move my mouse and high up position messes up the ratio of the moved distance between arm/wrist movement since the arc gets longer. You cannot compensate this by changing sensitivity. Lower position allows me to have higher sensitivity to turn around fast with arm and still be precise with wrist pivoting. I use relatively high sensitivity with the mice where the sensor is located optimally (~30 cm/360).
post #4217 of 4669
Quote:
Originally Posted by trism View Post

Just as your explanation is. I use both arm and the wrist to move my mouse and high up position messes up the ratio of the moved distance between arm/wrist movement since the arc gets longer. You cannot compensate this by changing sensitivity. Lower position allows me to have higher sensitivity to turn around fast with arm and still be precise with wrist pivoting. I use relatively high sensitivity with the mice where the sensor is located optimally (~30 cm/360).

I find myself subconsciously placing the sensor forward in my hand on all the mice I use. Some shapes I am fine with doing that, for others I cannot comfortably do that. When I start to land shots like I want I turn the mouse upside down to see where the sensor is, surprisingly it's basically in the same spot in my hand regardless of the mouse. I put tape at that spot to act as a "memory area," similar to how the Rival 700 does with the orange nubs.

I currently use 4.26 @ 415 CPI with my IO and 4.16 @ 425 CPI with my WMO. I was struggling with the IO because the sensor wasn't in the same spot in my hand as the WMO. I realized this later when I was experimenting with the WMO. Once I placed the IO further away from my palm I started to land shots like I do with the WMO, but the shape of the IO doesn't allow for a comfortable grip in this position. I rather use the WMO even though I want side buttons.
Edited by popups - 2/2/16 at 3:53am
post #4218 of 4669
So do I and when I feel the most control, the sensor is at around the upper pivoting point of the thumb when my thumb is straight. This is around 9 cm from my wrist pivoting point. I guess talking about this is pointless since it seems to come down to opinions anyways. I just like that the arm movement distance versus the sensor movement caused by the wrist pivot are quite close to each other.

Holy cow lower your sensitivity or get a higher CPI and compensate via the sensitivity value. You are missing headshots at long ranges with that sensitivity value. Talking about precisely tracking tiny heads when you have over 4 sensitivity is pointless.
Edited by trism - 2/2/16 at 4:02am
post #4219 of 4669
Quote:
Originally Posted by trism View Post

So do I and when I feel the most control, the sensor is at around the upper pivoting point of the thumb when my thumb is straight. This is around 9 cm from my wrist pivoting point. I guess talking about this is pointless since it seems to come down to opinions anyways. I just like that the arm movement distance versus the sensor movement caused by the wrist pivot are quite close to each other.

Holy cow lower your sensitivity or get a higher CPI and compensate via the sensitivity value. You are missing headshots at long ranges with that sensitivity value. Talking about precisely tracking tiny heads when you have over 4 sensitivity is pointless.

Read this: http://esreality.com/post/2410040/new-gaming-mice-vps-invention-and-more

I have that high of a sensitivity because I was using a 3090 FK on the native step (which is 2600 CPI). To test the WMO and IO I adjusted my sensitivity to be comparable (I also tested them on a very low sensitivity). Most gun fights don't happen at the longest ranges of the map, therefore that sensitivity value is almost irrelevant.

If FinalMouse really wanted to be fancy, they could have made a separate 3360 PCB that can be shifted up and down the mouse.
post #4220 of 4669
Quote:
Originally Posted by popups View Post

Probably because the sensor is much smaller and there is no point of making an over-sized PCB.

Isn't his suggestion purely based off a theory he has?

I rather have the sensor as far forward as the sensor being used allows. There is less movement necessary this way, which means it's faster and reduces effort throughout your play session. You can utilize more of your wrist for more consistent tracking.

http://esreality.com/post/2410040/new-gaming-mice-vps-invention-and-more

I think it's much more beneficial, in a game like GO, to have the sensor far forward. Targets are very small and players strafe constantly. The lower your sensitivity the more effort and speed is required. You might start to move your mouse to fast to properly control it when players are strafing constantly. Flick shots are much easier when you use your wrist, the same goes for controlling the recoil. Small corrections after a flick is easier when you just have to nudge the mouse a tiny distance.

You can always change the sensitivity if it is too slow for you, no reason to compromise accurate wrist control for that.. More the cross-hair moves with same wrist movement = more inaccuracy..

I think it is more important to have better accuracy in wrist movements than in whole hand movements since wrist movement is the last adjustment you do while aiming. You can always compensate poor whole hand aim by doing accurate wrist compensation before you shoot, not other way around.. So best possible accuracy for wrist movements and if you need more speed just increase sensitivity level..
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